Demographics: Age Distribution, Life Expectancy

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According to a 2014 analysis by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2007 and 2013 there was a "20 percent increase in the population aged 55 and older. In contrast, the segment between the ages of 25 and 54 saw a slight decline in numbers over those years." (p. 3)

According to a 2014 analysis by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2007 and 2013 there was a "20 percent increase in the population aged 55 and older. In contrast, the segment between the ages of 25 and 54 saw a slight decline in numbers over those years." (p. 3)

Rix, S. E. (2014). The employment situation, January 2014, and a look back at 2013: Fewer older workers unemployed, more out of the labor force. (Fact Sheet No. 302). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2014/the-employment-situation-january-2014-AARP-ppi-econ-sec.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--January 2014, USDL-14-0168 (Washington, DC: BLS, February 7, 2014);

According to a 2014 analysis of Health and Retirement Study data, "workers in the sample [ages 50-61], on average, estimated that they had a 68-percent chance of living to age 75 and a 47-percent chance of living to age 85." (p. 2)

According to a 2014 analysis of Health and Retirement Study data, "workers in the sample [ages 50-61], on average, estimated that they had a 68-percent chance of living to age 75 and a 47-percent chance of living to age 85." (p. 2)

Khan, M. R., Rutledge, M. S., & Wu, A. Y. (2014). Do longevity expectations influence retirement plans? (Issue in Brief No. 14-6). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/IB_14-6-508.pdf

The data source for the analysis is the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a survey administered to a panel of older workers and retirees every two years.

According to a 2012 AARP analysis of BLS and CPS data, "since December 2007, the aged 55-plus population has increased by almost 17 percent, nearly five times as much as the youngest segment (ages 16-24), while the middle segment (ages 25-54) has actually experienced a slight decline." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 AARP analysis of BLS and CPS data, "since December 2007, the aged 55-plus population has increased by almost 17 percent, nearly five times as much as the youngest segment (ages 16-24), while the middle segment (ages 25-54) has actually experienced a slight decline." (p. 2)

Rix, S. (2013). The employment situation, September 2012: Five years after the start of the great recession. (Fact Sheet No. 276). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2013/the-employment-situation-december-2012-AARP-ppi-econ-sec.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and from the Current Population Survey.

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, the median age of employed persons was 42.3 years, up from 39.4 years in 2000." (p. 1)

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, the median age of employed persons was 42.3 years, up from 39.4 years in 2000." (p. 1)

Hipple, S., & Sok, E. (2013). Tenure of American workers: Spotlight on statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2013/tenure/home.htm

Information on employee tenure has been obtained from supplemental questions to the Current Population Survey (CPS) every 2 years since 1996. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that provides data on employment and unemployment for the nation's civilian noninstitutional population ages 16 and older. The most recent supplement on job tenure was conducted in January 2012.

According to a 2013 AARP analysis, in 2010, the caregiver support ratio* was more than 7 potential caregivers for every person in the high-risk years of 80-plus. By 2030, the ratio is projected to decline sharply to 4 to 1; and it is expected to further fall to less than 3 to 1 in 2050, when all boomers...

According to a 2013 AARP analysis, in 2010, the caregiver support ratio* was more than 7 potential caregivers for every person in the high-risk years of 80-plus. By 2030, the ratio is projected to decline sharply to 4 to 1; and it is expected to further fall to less than 3 to 1 in 2050, when all boomers will be in the high-risk years of late life." *The "caregiver support ratio" is defined as the number of potential caregivers aged 45-64 for each person aged 80 and older. (p. 1)

Redfoot, R., Feinberg, L., & Houser, A. (2013). The aging of the baby boom and the growing care gap: A look at future declines in the availability of family caregivers. Washington, DC: AARP Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/ltc/2013/baby-boom-and-the-growing-care-gap-insight-AARP-ppi-ltc.pdf

This report uses data from Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) to calculate a national caregiver support ratio as well as caregiver support ratios for each state by dividing the population aged 45-64 by the population aged 80 and older.

According to a 2013 analysis of Census Bureau data, "over 2012-2022, the 55-years-and-older age group of the civilian noninstitutional population is projected to grow at 2.3 percent, much faster than the growth rate of 16-to-24-year-olds (a contraction of 0.4 percent) and that of 25-to-54-year-olds...

According to a 2013 analysis of Census Bureau data, "over 2012-2022, the 55-years-and-older age group of the civilian noninstitutional population is projected to grow at 2.3 percent, much faster than the growth rate of 16-to-24-year-olds (a contraction of 0.4 percent) and that of 25-to-54-year-olds (0.3 percent). Still, during the same timeframe, the 65-to-74-year-old age group is expected to grow by an even greater 3.8 percent. "

Toossi, M. (2013). Labor force projections to 2022: The labor force participation rate continues to fall. Monthly Labor Review. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/article/labor-force-projections-to-2022-the-labor-force-participation-rate-continues-to-fall.htm

The labor force projections are estimated by combining population projections calculated by the U.S. Census Bureau with the labor force participation rate projections developed by BLS. Data is from the BLS Current Population Survey (CPS) program and the Census Bureau.

According to a 2013 analysis of Census Bureau data, "the 55-years-and-older age group increased its relative share of the civilian noninstitutional population from 26.3 percent in 1992, to 27.6 percent in 2002, to 33.0 percent in 2012 and is projected to be nearly 38.0 percent of that population in...

According to a 2013 analysis of Census Bureau data, "the 55-years-and-older age group increased its relative share of the civilian noninstitutional population from 26.3 percent in 1992, to 27.6 percent in 2002, to 33.0 percent in 2012 and is projected to be nearly 38.0 percent of that population in 2022."

Toossi, M. (2013). Labor force projections to 2022: The labor force participation rate continues to fall. Monthly Labor Review. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/article/labor-force-projections-to-2022-the-labor-force-participation-rate-continues-to-fall.htm

The labor force projections are estimated by combining population projections calculated by the U.S. Census Bureau with the labor force participation rate projections developed by BLS. Data is from the BLS Current Population Survey (CPS) program and the Census Bureau.

According to a 2012 report based on analysis of census data, "in 2020, the 55-years-and-older age group will total 97.8 million, composing 28.7 percent of the 2020 resident population, compared with 24.7 percent in 2010. " (p. 45)

According to a 2012 report based on analysis of census data, "in 2020, the 55-years-and-older age group will total 97.8 million, composing 28.7 percent of the 2020 resident population, compared with 24.7 percent in 2010. " (p. 45)

Toossi, M. (2012). Labor force projections to 2020: A more slowly growing workforce. Monthly Labor Review, 135(1), 43-49. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2012/01/art3full.pdf

This article presents analysis of demographic data from the census and other BLS sources.

According to a 2012 analysis of BLS statistics, "since December 2007, the employed population aged 55 and over has increased by about 3.9 million, or by nearly 15 percent....Much of the increase in the labor force participation and employment of older people in recent years is a result of the increase...

According to a 2012 analysis of BLS statistics, "since December 2007, the employed population aged 55 and over has increased by about 3.9 million, or by nearly 15 percent....Much of the increase in the labor force participation and employment of older people in recent years is a result of the increase in the population aged 55 and over [from 69.6 million in December 2007 to 79.5 million in March 2012, an increase of more than 14 percent]. "Even if the labor force participation rate for this age group had remained at its December 2007 level (38.9 percent), the aged 55-plus labor force would have risen from 27.1 million to 30.9 million." (p. 4-5)

Rix, S. E. (2012). The employment situation, March 2012: Unemployment rises for older workers. (Fact Sheet No. 255). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2012/The-Employment-Situation-March-2012-AARP-ppi-econ-sec.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--March 2012, USDL-12-0614 (Washington, DC: BLS, April 6, 2012);

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, the proportion of one-person households grew slightly from 26 percent in 2000 to 27 percent in 2010. About one-third of one-person households had householders who were 65 years and over, compared with 22 percent of all householders." (p. 11)

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, the proportion of one-person households grew slightly from 26 percent in 2000 to 27 percent in 2010. About one-third of one-person households had householders who were 65 years and over, compared with 22 percent of all householders." (p. 11)

Lofquist, D., Lugaila, T., O'Connell, M., & Feliz, S. (2012). Households and families: 2010. (2010 Census Briefs No. C2010BR-14). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

This report uses decennial census data primarily for the years 2000 and 2010.

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2000, 25 million households had individuals aged 65 years and over, which amounted to 23 percent of all households. In 2010, the number of households with people aged 65 and over increased to 29 million, which accounted for 25 percent of households....

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2000, 25 million households had individuals aged 65 years and over, which amounted to 23 percent of all households. In 2010, the number of households with people aged 65 and over increased to 29 million, which accounted for 25 percent of households. (p. 17)

Lofquist, D., Lugaila, T., O'Connell, M., & Feliz, S. (2012). Households and families: 2010. (2010 Census Briefs No. C2010BR-14). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

This report uses decennial census data primarily for the years 2000 and 2010.

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2000, there were 3.9 million multigenerational households; that number increased to 5.1 million in 2010. In 2000, multigenerational households made up 3.7 percent of all households, while in 2010 they made up 4.4 percent of all households."...

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2000, there were 3.9 million multigenerational households; that number increased to 5.1 million in 2010. In 2000, multigenerational households made up 3.7 percent of all households, while in 2010 they made up 4.4 percent of all households." (p. 15)

Lofquist, D., Lugaila, T., O'Connell, M., & Feliz, S. (2012). Households and families: 2010. (2010 Census Briefs No. C2010BR-14). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

This report uses decennial census data primarily for the years 2000 and 2010.

According to a 2012 analysis of census data by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the 25-to-54-year-old age group's share of the total civilian noninstitutional population was 56.8 percent in 2000, dropped to 52.7 percent in 2010, and is projected to drop further, to 48.9 percent in 2020. The 35-to-44-year-olds'...

According to a 2012 analysis of census data by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the 25-to-54-year-old age group's share of the total civilian noninstitutional population was 56.8 percent in 2000, dropped to 52.7 percent in 2010, and is projected to drop further, to 48.9 percent in 2020. The 35-to-44-year-olds' share of the population is expected to decrease from 20.8 percent in 2000 to 16.2 percent in 2020. The 45-to-54-year-olds' share is projected to decrease from 18.6 percent in 2010 to 15.6 percent in 2020. By contrast, the 55-years-and-older age group increased its relative share, from 26.4 percent in 1990 to 27.1 percent in 2000. A decade later, in 2010, this group's share of the total civilian noninstitutional population increased to 31.4 percent. It is expected that the share will grow to 36.6 percent in 2020." (p. 46)

Toossi, M. (2012). Labor force projections to 2020: A more slowly growing workforce. Monthly Labor Review, 135(1), 43-49. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2012/01/art3full.pdf

This article presents analysis of demographic data from the census and other BLS sources.

According to a 2012 report based on analysis of census data, "in 2020, the 55-years-and-older age group will total 97.8 million, composing 28.7 percent of the 2020 resident population, compared with 24.7 percent in 2010. " (p. 45)

According to a 2012 report based on analysis of census data, "in 2020, the 55-years-and-older age group will total 97.8 million, composing 28.7 percent of the 2020 resident population, compared with 24.7 percent in 2010. " (p. 45)

Toossi, M. (2012). Labor force projections to 2020: A more slowly growing workforce. Monthly Labor Review, 135(1), 43-49. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2012/01/art3full.pdf

This article presents analysis of demographic data from the census and other BLS sources.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the Current Population Survey, "during the 2010-2020 period, the number of individuals aged 45 to 54 identifying as Hispanic or Latino is projected to increase by 1.9 million, the largest growth in terms of number of people of any age group."

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the Current Population Survey, "during the 2010-2020 period, the number of individuals aged 45 to 54 identifying as Hispanic or Latino is projected to increase by 1.9 million, the largest growth in terms of number of people of any age group."

Bureau of Labor Statiscis. (2012). National Hispanic heritage month: BLS spotlight on statistics. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/spotlight/2012/hispanic_heritage/

This report is based on analysis of labor force participation data collected in the Current Population Survey.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census Bureau data, "the share of the older population that is divorced has increased every decade since 1960 for every age group and for both men and women. In 2010, 11 percent of women and 9 percent of men ages 65 and older were divorced. In 2010, the proportion of...

According to a 2011 analysis of Census Bureau data, "the share of the older population that is divorced has increased every decade since 1960 for every age group and for both men and women. In 2010, 11 percent of women and 9 percent of men ages 65 and older were divorced. In 2010, the proportion of women ages 65 and older who were widowed (40 percent) was almost equal to the proportion who were married. However, the increase in male life expectancy has substantially reduced the share of women ages 65 to 74 who are widowed -- from 44 percent in 1960 to 24 percent in 2010." (p. 4)

Jacobsen, L. A., Kent, M., Lee, M., & Mather, M. (2011). America's aging population. (Population Bulletin, Vol. 66 No. 1). Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.prb.org/pdf11/aging-in-america.pdf

Data analyzed for this report comes from the U.S. Census Bureau, 1960 Census, 1980 Census, 2000 Census, PRB analysis of data from the 2010 Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

According to a 2011 analysis of CPS data, "there were 23.2 million people of color age 50 or older in the United States in 2010, including 9.6 million African Americans, 8.5 million Hispanics, 3.8 million Asian Americans, and 1.3 million other nonwhites." The number of Hispanics and Asian Americans...

According to a 2011 analysis of CPS data, "there were 23.2 million people of color age 50 or older in the United States in 2010, including 9.6 million African Americans, 8.5 million Hispanics, 3.8 million Asian Americans, and 1.3 million other nonwhites." The number of Hispanics and Asian Americans age 50 and older is projected to more than double between 2010 and 2030. By contrast, the non-Hispanic white population will increase only 16 percent. Hispanics will account for 15.3 percent of the 50+ U.S. population in 2030, up from 8.6 percent in 2010. The share of Asian Americans will increase from 3.9 to 6.3 percent." (p. 4)

Johnson, R. W., & Park, J. (2011). Employment and earnings among 50+ people of color. (Working Paper No. 4). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/uploadedpdf/412376-employment-and-earnings.pdf

This analysis is based on data from the 1980, 1995, and 2010 Current Population survey.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, "median U.S. age is 37.2, up from 32.6 in 1990. Now nearly four in ten Americans (39 percent) are over age 45, up from 34 percent in 2000 and 31 percent in 1990. ...this is the first census when persons age 45 and over represent a majority (53 percent) of...

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, "median U.S. age is 37.2, up from 32.6 in 1990. Now nearly four in ten Americans (39 percent) are over age 45, up from 34 percent in 2000 and 31 percent in 1990. ...this is the first census when persons age 45 and over represent a majority (53 percent) of the voting-age (18 and over) population." (p. 4)

Frey, W. H. (2011). The uneven aging and ‘younging’ of America: State and metropolitan trends in the 2010 census. Washington, DC: Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0628_census_frey/0628_census_aging_frey.pdf

Data for this study draw from U.S. decennial censuses of 1990, 2000, and 2010.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data,"the population age 45 and over grew 18 times as fast as the population under age 45 between 2000 and 2010...All states and metropolitan areas are showing noticeable growth in their older and 'advanced middle age' populations." (p. 1)

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data,"the population age 45 and over grew 18 times as fast as the population under age 45 between 2000 and 2010...All states and metropolitan areas are showing noticeable growth in their older and 'advanced middle age' populations." (p. 1)

Frey, W. H. (2011). The uneven aging and ‘younging’ of America: State and metropolitan trends in the 2010 census. Washington, DC: Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0628_census_frey/0628_census_aging_frey.pdf

Data for this study draw from U.S. decennial censuses of 1990, 2000, and 2010.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, in the United States as a whole, "the age-45-and-above population increased by more than one-quarter while the under-45 population increased by a mere 1.4 percent. Most notable is the 50 percent growth of those aged 55-64, heralding the ascension of the early...

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, in the United States as a whole, "the age-45-and-above population increased by more than one-quarter while the under-45 population increased by a mere 1.4 percent. Most notable is the 50 percent growth of those aged 55-64, heralding the ascension of the early baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1955) into older life stages." (p. 3)

Frey, W. H. (2011). The uneven aging and ‘younging’ of america: State and metropolitan trends in the 2010 census. Washington, DC: Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0628_census_frey/0628_census_aging_frey.pdf

Data for this study draw from U.S. decennial censuses of 1990, 2000, and 2010.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, "suburbs are aging more rapidly than cities with higher growth rates for their age-45-and-above populations and larger shares of seniors. People age 45 and older represent 40 percent of suburban residents, compared to 35 percent of city residents." (p. 1)

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, "suburbs are aging more rapidly than cities with higher growth rates for their age-45-and-above populations and larger shares of seniors. People age 45 and older represent 40 percent of suburban residents, compared to 35 percent of city residents." (p. 1)

Frey, W. H. (2011). The uneven aging and ‘younging’ of america: State and metropolitan trends in the 2010 census. Washington, DC: Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0628_census_frey/0628_census_aging_frey.pdf

Data for this study draw from U.S. decennial censuses of 1990, 2000, and 2010.

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS and ACS data, "despite the overall aging of the population, one notable change is that a younger age group will surpass one of the baby boom age groups: by 2018, young adults ages 25-29 will number 23.3 million, compared to 22.1 million for the 55-59-year olds (the...

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS and ACS data, "despite the overall aging of the population, one notable change is that a younger age group will surpass one of the baby boom age groups: by 2018, young adults ages 25-29 will number 23.3 million, compared to 22.1 million for the 55-59-year olds (the largest 5 year age group for the baby boomers)." (p. 20)

Public Policy Institute of California. (2011). An assessment of labor force projections through 2018: Will workers have the education needed for the available jobs? Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/labor-force-projections-workers-education--gates-foundation.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the 2008 American Community Survey.

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS and American Community Survey data, "younger boomers are much more numerous than older boomers. In 2008, the oldest boomers were aged 62 and numbered 2.7 million. By 2018 most of those boomer will have retired. However, the youngest boomers (those aged 44 in 2008)...

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS and American Community Survey data, "younger boomers are much more numerous than older boomers. In 2008, the oldest boomers were aged 62 and numbered 2.7 million. By 2018 most of those boomer will have retired. However, the youngest boomers (those aged 44 in 2008) numbered 4.6 million and will not have reached retirement age by 2018." By 2030, all of the boomers will be over the age of 65."

Public Policy Institute of California. (2011). An assessment of labor force projections through 2018: Will workers have the education needed for the available jobs? Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/labor-force-projections-workers-education--gates-foundation.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the 2008 American Community Survey.

According to a 2011 report on population aging, "U.S. life expectancy has increased from 68.9 years in 1950 to 79.2 years in 2009, in large part due to the reduction in mortality at older ages."

According to a 2011 report on population aging, "U.S. life expectancy has increased from 68.9 years in 1950 to 79.2 years in 2009, in large part due to the reduction in mortality at older ages."

Jacobsen, L. A., Kent, M., Lee, M., & Mather, M. (2011). America's aging population. (Population Bulletin, Vol. 66 No. 1). Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.prb.org/pdf11/aging-in-america.pdf

Data analyzed for this report comes from the U.S. Census Bureau, 1960 Census, 1980 Census, 2000 Census, PRB analysis of data from the 2010 Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

According to the 2011 Profile of Older Americans, "there were 64,024 persons aged 100 or more in 2009 (0.2% of the total 65+ population). This is a 72% increase from the 1990 figure of 37,306."

According to the 2011 Profile of Older Americans, "there were 64,024 persons aged 100 or more in 2009 (0.2% of the total 65+ population). This is a 72% increase from the 1990 figure of 37,306."

Administration on Aging. (2011). A profile of older Americans- 2010. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/index.aspx

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis.

According to the 2011 Profile of Older Americans, "over half (54.8%) the older noninstitutionalized persons lived with their spouse in 2009. Approximately 11.4 million or 72.0% of older men, and 8.7 million or 40.7% of older women, lived with their spouse. About 30.1% (11.4 million) of all noninstitutionalized...

According to the 2011 Profile of Older Americans, "over half (54.8%) the older noninstitutionalized persons lived with their spouse in 2009. Approximately 11.4 million or 72.0% of older men, and 8.7 million or 40.7% of older women, lived with their spouse. About 30.1% (11.4 million) of all noninstitutionalized older persons in 2009 lived alone (8.3 million women, 3.0 million men). They represented 38.8% of older women and 18.7% of older men."

Administration on Aging. (2011). A profile of older Americans- 2010. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/index.aspx

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis.

According to a 2010 analysis of Census Bureau data, "there were roughly 80.0 million baby boomers in the U.S. in 2000; 8.0 million (10.0%) of these were Latinos. Of the 80 million boomers, 15.0% (12.0 million) were born outside of the United States; Latinos accounted for over 5 million (43%) of these...

According to a 2010 analysis of Census Bureau data, "there were roughly 80.0 million baby boomers in the U.S. in 2000; 8.0 million (10.0%) of these were Latinos. Of the 80 million boomers, 15.0% (12.0 million) were born outside of the United States; Latinos accounted for over 5 million (43%) of these foreign-born boomers." (p. 59)

Gassoumis, Z. D., Wilber, K. H., Baker, L. A., & Torres-Gil, F. M. (2010). Who are the Latino baby boomers? Demographic and economic characteristics of a hidden population. Journal of Aging & Social Policy, 22(1), 53-68.

This analysis is based on data from the 2000 U.S. Census.

According to a 2010 anlysis of CPS data by the Sloan Center on Aging and Work, 30 years ago, the percentage of people aged 55+ in the population was 27.3%, but as of February 2010 it is 31.2%.

According to a 2010 anlysis of CPS data by the Sloan Center on Aging and Work, 30 years ago, the percentage of people aged 55+ in the population was 27.3%, but as of February 2010 it is 31.2%.

McNamara, T. K. (2010). [Unpublished data analysis from the Current Population Survey, 1980 and 2010.] Available at http://data.bls.gov:8080/PDQ/outside.jsp?survey=ln

Note

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "the population 65 and over will increase from 35 million in 2000 to 40 million in 2010 (a 15% increase) and then to 55 million in 2020 (a 36% increase for that decade). By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, almost twice their number...

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "the population 65 and over will increase from 35 million in 2000 to 40 million in 2010 (a 15% increase) and then to 55 million in 2020 (a 36% increase for that decade). By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, almost twice their number in 2008. People 65+ represented 12.8% of the population in the year 2008 but are expected to grow to be 19.3% of the population by 2030." (p. 5)

Administration on Aging. (2010). A profile of older Americans- 2009. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/2009/docs/2009profile_508.pdf

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "since 1900, the percentage of Americans 65+ has tripled (from 4.1% in 1900 to 12.8% in 2008), and the number has increased more than twelve times (from 3.1 million to 38.9 million). The older population itself is increasingly older. In 2008, the 65-74...

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "since 1900, the percentage of Americans 65+ has tripled (from 4.1% in 1900 to 12.8% in 2008), and the number has increased more than twelve times (from 3.1 million to 38.9 million). The older population itself is increasingly older. In 2008, the 65-74 age group (20.1 million) was over 9 times larger than in 1900. In contrast, the 75-84 group (13.0 million) was 17 times larger and the 85+ group (5.7 million) was 47 times larger. (p. 4)

Administration on Aging. (2010). A profile of older Americans- 2009. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/2009/docs/2009profile_508.pdf

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "in 2008, there were 22.4 million older women and 16.5 million older men, or a sex ratio of 136 women for every 100 men. The female to male sex ratio increases with age, ranging from 114 for the 65-69 age group to a high of 207 for persons 85 and over."...

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "in 2008, there were 22.4 million older women and 16.5 million older men, or a sex ratio of 136 women for every 100 men. The female to male sex ratio increases with age, ranging from 114 for the 65-69 age group to a high of 207 for persons 85 and over." (p. 4)

Administration on Aging. (2010). A profile of older Americans- 2009. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/2009/docs/2009profile_508.pdf

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "the older population--persons 65 years or older--numbered 38.9 million in 2008... They represented 12.8% of the U.S. population, over one in every eight Americans. The number of older Americans increased by 4.5 million or 13.0% since 1998, compared...

According to a 2010 Administration on Aging report, "the older population--persons 65 years or older--numbered 38.9 million in 2008... They represented 12.8% of the U.S. population, over one in every eight Americans. The number of older Americans increased by 4.5 million or 13.0% since 1998, compared to an increase of 12.4% for the under-65 population. However, the number of Americans aged 45-64 who will reach 65 over the next two decades increased by 31% during this period. " (p. 4)

Administration on Aging. (2010). A profile of older Americans- 2009. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/Profile/2009/docs/2009profile_508.pdf

Principal sources of data for the Profile are the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the National Center on Health Statistics, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Profile incorporates the latest data available but not all items are updated on an annual basis

According to a 2010 report from Rand Europe, "the total fertility rate is now less than two children per woman in every EU member state, all below replacement level. Yet, by 2050 almost one-third of Europeans will be over 65 years old."

According to a 2010 report from Rand Europe, "the total fertility rate is now less than two children per woman in every EU member state, all below replacement level. Yet, by 2050 almost one-third of Europeans will be over 65 years old."

Rand Corporation. (2010). Does Europe have enough babies? Retrieved April 16, 2010, from http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/2010/RAND_CP602.1.pdf

RAND Europe's initial study in 2004 of the population ageing issue analysed European demographic trends and behaviour, and assessed which policies could prevent or mitigate adverse consequences. See the full report at http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2004/RAND_MG206.pdf

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "in 2008, an estimated 49 million Americans, or 16% of the total U.S. population, lived in a family household that contained at least two adult generations or a grandparent and at least one other generation. In 1980, this figure was just 28 million, or 12% of the population....

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "in 2008, an estimated 49 million Americans, or 16% of the total U.S. population, lived in a family household that contained at least two adult generations or a grandparent and at least one other generation. In 1980, this figure was just 28 million, or 12% of the population. About one in five adults ages 25 to 34 now live in a multi-generational household. So do one-in-five adults ages 65 and older." (p. 1)

Pew Research Center. (2010). The return of the multi-generational family household. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/752-multi-generational-families.pdf

Survey results for this report are from a telephone survey conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. Interviews were conducted Feb. 23-March 23, 2009.

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "the older population is projected to be 42 percent minority in 2050, up from 20 percent in 2010. Among those aged 65 and over in 2050, 77 percent are projected to be White alone, down from 87 percent in 2010. Within the same age group, 12 percent...

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "the older population is projected to be 42 percent minority in 2050, up from 20 percent in 2010. Among those aged 65 and over in 2050, 77 percent are projected to be White alone, down from 87 percent in 2010. Within the same age group, 12 percent are projected to be Black alone and 9 percent are projected to be Asian alone in 2050, up from 9 percent and 3 percent, respectively, in 2010." (p. 4-5)

Vincent, G. K., & Velkoff, V. (2010). The next four decades: The older population in the United States: 2010 to 2050 (Current Population Reports No. P25-1138). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf

Released in August of 2008, the national population projections are of the resident population, as well as demographic components of change (births, deaths, and net international migration), by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. The projections are based on Census 2000 and were produced using a cohort-component method. The components of change were projected into the future based on past trends. The projections cover the period 2000–2050

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "in 2010, 60 percent of the U.S. population will be aged 20-64. By 2030, as the baby boomers age, the proportion in these working ages will drop to 55 percent." (p. 2)

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "in 2010, 60 percent of the U.S. population will be aged 20-64. By 2030, as the baby boomers age, the proportion in these working ages will drop to 55 percent." (p. 2)

Vincent, G. K., & Velkoff, V. (2010). The next four decades: The older population in the United States: 2010 to 2050 (Current Population Reports No. P25-1138). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf

Released in August of 2008, the national population projections are of the resident population, as well as demographic components of change (births, deaths, and net international migration), by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. The projections are based on Census 2000 and were produced using a cohort-component method. The components of change were projected into the future based on past trends. The projections cover the period 2000-2050

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "in 2050, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to be 88.5 million, more than double its projected population of 40.2 million in 2010." (p. 1)

According to 2010 Census Bureau population projections, "in 2050, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is projected to be 88.5 million, more than double its projected population of 40.2 million in 2010." (p. 1)

Vincent, G. K., & Velkoff, V. (2010). The next four decades: The older population in the United States: 2010 to 2050 (Current Population Reports No. P25-1138). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf

Released in August of 2008, the national population projections are of the resident population, as well as demographic components of change (births, deaths, and net international migration), by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. The projections are based on Census 2000 and were produced using a cohort-component method. The components of change were projected into the future based on past trends. The projections cover the period 2000-2050

According to the Older Americans 2010 report,  "in 2008, there were an estimated 39 million people age 65 and over in the United States, accounting for just over 13 percent of the total population. The older population in 2030 is expected to be twice as large as in 2000, growing from 35 million...

According to the Older Americans 2010 report,  "in 2008, there were an estimated 39 million people age 65 and over in the United States, accounting for just over 13 percent of the total population. The older population in 2030 is expected to be twice as large as in 2000, growing from 35 million to 72 million and representing nearly 20 percent of the total U.S. population." (p. xiv)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to a 2010 analysis of national vital statistics data, "during 1970--2007, life expectancy at birth in the United States demonstrated a long-term increasing trend for the total population, for both males and females, and for the black and white populations. In 2007, the disparities in life...

According to a 2010 analysis of national vital statistics data, "during 1970--2007, life expectancy at birth in the United States demonstrated a long-term increasing trend for the total population, for both males and females, and for the black and white populations. In 2007, the disparities in life expectancy for males compared with females and for blacks compared with whites were the smallest ever recorded. Life expectancy at birth was highest for white females (80.8 years), followed by black females (76.8), white males (75.9), and black males (70.0)."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). QuickStats: Life expectancy at birth, by race and sex --- United States, 1970--2007. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 59(36), 1185. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5936a9.htm?s_cid=mm5936a9_e

The analysis presented in the report comes from the following source: Xu J, Kochanek KD, Murphy SL, Tejada-Vera B. Deaths: final data for 2007. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2010;58(19). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr58/nvsr58_19.pdf

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the International Social Security Project, the percentage increase in life expectancy at age 65 between the 1960s and the early 2000s was, on average, almost 30% in the 12 countries studied. "The increase, however, differed substantially across the countries,...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the International Social Security Project, the percentage increase in life expectancy at age 65 between the 1960s and the early 2000s was, on average, almost 30% in the 12 countries studied. "The increase, however, differed substantially across the countries, from a low of about 12% in the Netherlands and Denmark to about 55% in Japan."

Wise, D. A. (2010). Facilitating longer working lives: International evidence on why and how. Demography, 47, S131-S149. doi:DOI: 10.1353/dem.2010.0000

This analysis is based on data from the the International Social Security Project.

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "the baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) will start turning 65 in 2011, and the number of older people will increase dramatically during the 2010-2030 period. The older population in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as their counterparts...

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "the baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) will start turning 65 in 2011, and the number of older people will increase dramatically during the 2010-2030 period. The older population in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as their counterparts in 2000, growing from 35 million to 72 million and representing nearly 20 percent of the total U.S. population." (p. 2)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "in 2008, 39 million people age 65 and over lived in the United States, accounting for 13 percent of the total population. The older population grew from 3 million in 1900 to 39 million in 2008. The oldest-old population (those age 85 and over) grew from...

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "in 2008, 39 million people age 65 and over lived in the United States, accounting for 13 percent of the total population. The older population grew from 3 million in 1900 to 39 million in 2008. The oldest-old population (those age 85 and over) grew from just over 100,000 in 1900 to 5.7 million in 2008." (p. 2)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "life expectancy varies by race, but the difference decreases with age. In 2006, life expectancy at birth was 5 years higher for white people than for black people. At age 65, white people can expect to live an average of 1.5 years longer than black people....

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "life expectancy varies by race, but the difference decreases with age. In 2006, life expectancy at birth was 5 years higher for white people than for black people. At age 65, white people can expect to live an average of 1.5 years longer than black people. Among those who survive to age 85, however, the life expectancy among black people is slightly higher (6.7 years) than white people (6.3 years)." (p. 24)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "under current mortality conditions, people who survive to age 65 can expect to live an average of 18.5 more years, about 4 years longer than people age 65 in 1960. The life expectancy of people who survive to age 85 today is 6.8 years for women and 5.7...

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "under current mortality conditions, people who survive to age 65 can expect to live an average of 18.5 more years, about 4 years longer than people age 65 in 1960. The life expectancy of people who survive to age 85 today is 6.8 years for women and 5.7 years for men." (p. 24)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to a 2012 analysis of census data, "the average age at which men and women first marry is now the highest ever recorded, having risen by roughly five years in the past half century....In 2010 the estimated median age at first marriage for men was 28, for women it was 26...The survey also finds...

According to a 2012 analysis of census data, "the average age at which men and women first marry is now the highest ever recorded, having risen by roughly five years in the past half century....In 2010 the estimated median age at first marriage for men was 28, for women it was 26...The survey also finds striking differences by generation. In 1960, two-thirds (68%) of all twenty-somethings were married. In 2008, just 26% were."

Pew Research Center. (2010). The decline of marriage and rise of new families. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/2010/11/18/the-decline-of-marriage-and-rise-of-new-families/2/#ii-overview

This report includes analysis of data from the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey.

According to a 2010 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2010, 60 percent of the U.S. population will be aged 20-64. By 2030, as the baby boomers age, the proportion in these working ages will drop to 55 percent." (p. 3)

According to a 2010 report from the US Census Bureau, "in 2010, 60 percent of the U.S. population will be aged 20-64. By 2030, as the baby boomers age, the proportion in these working ages will drop to 55 percent." (p. 3)

Vincent, G. K., & Velkoff, V. (2010). The next four decades -the older population in the united states: 2010 to 2050. (Current Population Reports No. P25-1138). Washington, DC: US Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf

This report uses projections of the total U.S. population as of July 1 for the years 2000-2050. The universe is the resident population of the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The projections are based on Census data.

According to a 2010 report from the US Census Bureau, "by 2030, all of the baby boomers will have moved into the ranks of the older population. This will result in a shift in the age structure, from 13 percent of the population aged 65 and older in 2010 to 19 percent in 2030." (p. 3)

According to a 2010 report from the US Census Bureau, "by 2030, all of the baby boomers will have moved into the ranks of the older population. This will result in a shift in the age structure, from 13 percent of the population aged 65 and older in 2010 to 19 percent in 2030." (p. 3)

Vincent, G. K., & Velkoff, V. (2010). The next four decades -the older population in the United States: 2010 to 2050. (Current Population Reports No. P25-1138). Washington, DC: US Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/p25-1138.pdf

This report uses projections of the total U.S. population as of July 1 for the years 2000-2050. The universe is the resident population of the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The projections are based on Census data.

According to a 2008 analysis of Census Bureau projections for the years 2005 to 2025, "the number of people 25 to 54 years old--the ages when labor force participation rates are highest--will increase by only 3.8%.  At the same time, the number of people between the ages of 55 and 64 is projected...

According to a 2008 analysis of Census Bureau projections for the years 2005 to 2025, "the number of people 25 to 54 years old--the ages when labor force participation rates are highest--will increase by only 3.8%.  At the same time, the number of people between the ages of 55 and 64 is projected to increase by 11 million, or more than 36%.  While the number of people between the ages of 25 and 64 is projected to increase by about 16 million between 2005 and 2025, more than two-thirds of the increase is projected to occur among people between the ages of 55 and 64." (p. 86)

Purcell, P. J. (2009). Older workers: Employment and retirement trends. Journal of Deferred Compensation, 14(2), 85-102

In this report, data from the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and Social Security Administration are analyzed.

According to 2008 Census Bureau demographic indicators, life expectancy at birth in the United States in the year 2005 was 78 years. Projected life expectancy for 2025 is 79 years, and for 2025, 80 years.

According to 2008 Census Bureau demographic indicators, life expectancy at birth in the United States in the year 2005 was 78 years. Projected life expectancy for 2025 is 79 years, and for 2025, 80 years.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2009). United States IDB country summary. Retrieved March 26, 2009, from http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/country/usportal.html

U.S. data are based on official Cesus Bureau estimates and projections

According to 2008 Census Bureau populations projections for the year 2050, persons aged 80 and older will be the largest population segment in the United States, with 7.4% of the total population, more than doubling compared to projections for 2025 of 4.2%. In the year 2000, persons aged 80 and over...

According to 2008 Census Bureau populations projections for the year 2050, persons aged 80 and older will be the largest population segment in the United States, with 7.4% of the total population, more than doubling compared to projections for 2025 of 4.2%. In the year 2000, persons aged 80 and over were 3.3% of the population.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2009). International data base (IDB) - pyramids. Retrieved March 9, 2009, from http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/pyramids.html

U.S. data are based on official Census Bureau estimates and projections

According to a 2009 analysis of US population projections, by 2010 the United States overall is projected to experience significant decreases in its population under age 45 and increases in its population aged 55 and older. (fig. 1, p. 3)

According to a 2009 analysis of US population projections, by 2010 the United States overall is projected to experience significant decreases in its population under age 45 and increases in its population aged 55 and older. (fig. 1, p. 3)

McNamara, T. K., Wong, M., Brown, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2009). States as employers-of-choice (State Research Highlight No. 01). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SRH01_EmployersofChoice.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

According to a 2009 analysis of US Current Population Survey data, "between 2010 and 2030, while the number of people between the ages of 25 and 64 is projected to increase by about 15.5 million, or 9.4%, the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to grow by 31.7 million, or 79.2%." (p. 2)

According to a 2009 analysis of US Current Population Survey data, "between 2010 and 2030, while the number of people between the ages of 25 and 64 is projected to increase by about 15.5 million, or 9.4%, the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to grow by 31.7 million, or 79.2%." (p. 2)

Purcell, P. (2009). Older workers: Employment and retirement trends. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/files/crs-rl30629.pdf

This reports presents an analysis of data from various years of the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey and the Annual Statistical Supplement to the Social Security Bulletin.

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Census data, "Between 2007 and 2050, the number of Latinos ages 50 to 69 is projected to nearly quadruple, growing from 5.6 million to 22.2 million. In 2020, Latinos will account for about 13 percent of the U.S. population ages 50-69, up from 9 percent in 2007....

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Census data, "Between 2007 and 2050, the number of Latinos ages 50 to 69 is projected to nearly quadruple, growing from 5.6 million to 22.2 million. In 2020, Latinos will account for about 13 percent of the U.S. population ages 50-69, up from 9 percent in 2007. By 2050, they will account for about 24 percent of the ages-50-to-60 population." (p. 6)

Johnson, R. W., & Soto, M. (2009). 50+ Hispanic workers: A growing segment of the U.S. workforce. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/hispanic_workers_09.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, as well as from the U.S. Department of Labor, University of Michigan and the Urban Institute.

According to a 2009 report from the U.S. Census Bureau, "the 65-and-older population is projected to increase by 79 percent from 2010 to 2030, representing 19 percent of the total population by 2030." (p. 1)

According to a 2009 report from the U.S. Census Bureau, "the 65-and-older population is projected to increase by 79 percent from 2010 to 2030, representing 19 percent of the total population by 2030." (p. 1)

Woodring, B. K., & Howard, D. J. (2009). Work status of people 65 years and older: 2008 American Community Survey. Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2009pubs/acsbr08-10.pdf

This report presents data on the work status of people aged 65 and older at the national and state levels based on the 2008 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau.

A 2009 analysis of U. S. census and vital statistics data forecasts that the population in the retirement ages of sixty-five and older will rise from 38.7 million observed in 2008 to between 99 million and 108 million by 2050, and that the population aged eighty-five and older will rise from 5.4 million...

A 2009 analysis of U. S. census and vital statistics data forecasts that the population in the retirement ages of sixty-five and older will rise from 38.7 million observed in 2008 to between 99 million and 108 million by 2050, and that the population aged eighty-five and older will rise from 5.4 million in 2008 to between 27 million and 35 million by 2050. (p. 853)

Olshansky, S. J., Goldman, D. P., Zheng, Y., & Rowe, J. W. (2009). Aging in America in the twenty-first century: Demographic forecasts from the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on an Aging Society. The Milbank Quarterly, 87(4), 842-862.

This forecast is based on census data for the resident population of the United States (U.S. Census Bureau 2008) and from Vital Statistics of the United States (National Bureau of Economic Research 2008).

According to a 2009 table from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, 17.4% of the U.S. population is 60 years of age and over, while 15.3% are 62 years and over, and 12.6% are 65 and over. (Table S0101)

According to a 2009 table from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, 17.4% of the U.S. population is 60 years of age and over, while 15.3% are 62 years and over, and 12.6% are 65 and over. (Table S0101)

U.S. Census Bureau. (2009). United States - age and sex. Table S0101. Retrieved January 7, 2010, from http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/STTable?_bm=y&-geo_id=01000US&-qr_name=ACS_2008_3YR_G00_S0101&-ds_name=ACS_2008_3YR_G00_

This data comes from the 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table S0101.

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics analysis, the median age of the labor force in 2008 was 41.2. In 2018 is expected to be 42.3." (p. 49)

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics analysis, the median age of the labor force in 2008 was 41.2. In 2018 is expected to be 42.3." (p. 49)

Toossi, M. (2009). Labor force projections to 2018: Older workers staying more active. Monthly Labor Review, 132(11), 30-51.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics carries out labor force projections every 2 years based on the most recent demographic data. The civilian noninstitutional labor force consists of all employed and unemployed persons actively looking for a job

In 2008, baby boomers (people born between 1946-64) made up 26.6% of the United States population and 39.3% of the United States labor force, according to analysis of 2008 Current Population Survey data.

In 2008, baby boomers (people born between 1946-64) made up 26.6% of the United States population and 39.3% of the United States labor force, according to analysis of 2008 Current Population Survey data.

Besen, E. (2008) [Analysis of Current Population Survey]. Unpublished raw data.

This analysis was conducted at the Sloan Center for Aging and Work at Boston College, and was based on the 2008 Current Population Survey of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to a 2008 BLS report, "between 1977 and 2007, the age 65 and older civilian noninstitutional population increased by about 60 percent, somewhat faster than the civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over (46 percent). Yet employment of people 65 and over doubled while employment for...

According to a 2008 BLS report, "between 1977 and 2007, the age 65 and older civilian noninstitutional population increased by about 60 percent, somewhat faster than the civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over (46 percent). Yet employment of people 65 and over doubled while employment for everyone 16 and over increased by less than 60 percent."


Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). Spotlight on statistics: Older workers. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://stats.bls.gov/spotlight/2008/older_workers/pdf/older_workers_bls_spotlight.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and BLS Employment Projections.

According to a 2008 report from the Sloan Center for Aging and Work, "the life expectancy at birth for the United States population was 78.0 years in 2007, 75.1 years for men and 80.97 years for women." (fig. 11, p. 7)

According to a 2008 report from the Sloan Center for Aging and Work, "the life expectancy at birth for the United States population was 78.0 years in 2007, 75.1 years for men and 80.97 years for women." (fig. 11, p. 7)



Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. (2008). Statistical profile of the United States (Country Statistical Profile No. 2). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/CP02_Workforce_USA.pdf

The Country Profile Series focuses on statistics that can guide decisionmaking at the workplace: workforce highlights, economic highlights, and population highlights. Data sources include United States Bureau of Labor Statistics , U.S. Census Bureau, International Labor Organization, and OECD.

As shown in a 2008 report from the Sloan Center for Aging and Work, "in the United States, 10.7 percent of the male population and 14.3 percent of the female population is 65 or older." (fig. 11a, p. 7)

As shown in a 2008 report from the Sloan Center for Aging and Work, "in the United States, 10.7 percent of the male population and 14.3 percent of the female population is 65 or older." (fig. 11a, p. 7)

Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. (2008). Statistical profile of the United States (Country Statistical Profile No. 2). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/CP02_Workforce_USA.pdf

The Country Profile Series focuses on statistics that can guide decisionmaking at the workplace: workforce highlights, economic highlights, and population highlights. Data sources include United States Bureau of Labor Statistics , U.S. Census Bureau, International Labor Organization, and OECD.

According to a 2007 analysis of CPS data, "in 2005, Hispanics represented 14.9 percent of the U.S. population, making them the largest minority group. Hispanics age 65 and older represented 6.6 percent of the total 65 and older population. This portion is projected to increase to 17 percent in 2050."...

According to a 2007 analysis of CPS data, "in 2005, Hispanics represented 14.9 percent of the U.S. population, making them the largest minority group. Hispanics age 65 and older represented 6.6 percent of the total 65 and older population. This portion is projected to increase to 17 percent in 2050." (p. 1)

Wu, K. B. (2007). Hispanics age 65 and older: Sources of retirement income in 2005. Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/fs135_hisp_retire.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the U. S. Bureau of the Census, March 2006 Current Population Survey.

According to a 2006 survey of older workers, "Overall, respondents expect to live to a median age of '81-85.' This estimate is in keeping with today's average life expectancy, which for 55-70 year olds ranges from 79-83 years for men and from 83-86 years for women." (p.18)

According to a 2006 survey of older workers, "Overall, respondents expect to live to a median age of '81-85.' This estimate is in keeping with today's average life expectancy, which for 55-70 year olds ranges from 79-83 years for men and from 83-86 years for women." (p.18)

MetLife Mature Market Institute. (2006, April). Living longer, working longer: The changing landscape of the aging workforce- a MetLife Study.  New York, NY: MetLife Mature Market Institute, DeLong, D., & Zogby International.  Retrieved August 10, 2006, from http://www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/93703586101144176243V1FLivingLonger.pdf

"This study describes the decisions that older workers are actually making about work and retirement. It reports on their experiences more than their expectations of the journey into retirement, assuming that life stage is not defined by some date, but is rather an ongoing process… It consisted of an interactive online survey conducted by Zogby with a panel of 2,719 respondents. To qualify for the study, participants had to be between the ages of 55-70. Slight weights were added to region, race and gender to more accurately reflect the population of U.S. adults. A primary focus of the 50-question survey was to better understand the experiences and behaviors of the aging workforce, so the survey included many questions asked only of people who were still working or seeking work, either full- or part-time.”

In 2005, individuals aged 45-54 represented 14.4% of the population. In 2005, individuals aged 55-64 represented 10.1% of the population.  In 2005, individuals aged 65-74 represented 6.3% of the population.  In 2005, individuals aged 75-84 represented 4.5% of the population.  In 2005,...

In 2005, individuals aged 45-54 represented 14.4% of the population. In 2005, individuals aged 55-64 represented 10.1% of the population.  In 2005, individuals aged 65-74 represented 6.3% of the population.  In 2005, individuals aged 75-84 represented 4.5% of the population.  In 2005, individuals aged 85-94 represented 1.3% of the population.

Havens, J. (2006). [Analysis of the U.S. Census Current Population Survey for March 2005]. Unpublished raw data. Center on Wealth and Philanthropy for the Center on Aging & Work / Workplace Flexibility. Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA

"The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey has been conducted for more than 50 years. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. Respondents are interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household 15 years of age and older. However, published data focus on those ages 16 and over. The sample provides estimates for the nation as a whole and serves as part of model-based estimates for individual states and other geographic areas. Estimates obtained from the CPS include employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators...They are available by a variety of demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, marital status, and educational attainment...occupation, industry, and class of worker."

In 2005, 49.0% of the population was male and 51.0% of the population was female. In 2005, 49.0% of individuals aged 45-54 were male and 51.0% were female. In 2005, 47.6% of individuals aged 55-64 were male and 52.4% were female. In 2005, 46.0% of individuals aged 65-74 were male and 54.0% were female....

In 2005, 49.0% of the population was male and 51.0% of the population was female. In 2005, 49.0% of individuals aged 45-54 were male and 51.0% were female. In 2005, 47.6% of individuals aged 55-64 were male and 52.4% were female. In 2005, 46.0% of individuals aged 65-74 were male and 54.0% were female. In 2005, 41.7% of individuals aged 75-84 were male and 58.3% were female. In 2005, 33.2% of individuals aged 85-94 were male and 66.8% were female.

Havens, J. (2006). [Analysis of the U.S. Census Current Population Survey for March 2005]. Unpublished raw data. Center on Wealth and Philanthropy for the Center on Aging & Work / Workplace Flexibility. Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA

"The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey has been conducted for more than 50 years. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. Respondents are interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household 15 years of age and older. However, published data focus on those ages 16 and over. The sample provides estimates for the nation as a whole and serves as part of model-based estimates for individual states and other geographic areas. Estimates obtained from the CPS include employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators...They are available by a variety of demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, marital status, and educational attainment...occupation, industry, and class of worker."

In 2005, 92.1% of workers were under the age of 55, 12.6% were aged 55-64, 2.8% were aged 65-74, and 0.8% were aged 75 and older.

In 2005, 92.1% of workers were under the age of 55, 12.6% were aged 55-64, 2.8% were aged 65-74, and 0.8% were aged 75 and older.

Havens, J. (2006). [Analysis of the U.S. Census Current Population Survey for March 2005]. Unpublished raw data. Center on Wealth and Philanthropy for the Center on Aging & Work / Workplace Flexibility. Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA

"The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey has been conducted for more than 50 years. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. Respondents are interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household 15 years of age and older. However, published data focus on those ages 16 and over. The sample provides estimates for the nation as a whole and serves as part of model-based estimates for individual states and other geographic areas. Estimates obtained from the CPS include employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators...They are available by a variety of demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, marital status, and educational attainment...occupation, industry, and class of worker."

A 2006 analysis based on the U.S. Census projects that an average of 4.6 adults will turn 65 each minute in 2007. In 2025, an average of 8.0 adults will turn 65 each minute. (McNamara, 2006).

A 2006 analysis based on the U.S. Census projects that an average of 4.6 adults will turn 65 each minute in 2007. In 2025, an average of 8.0 adults will turn 65 each minute. (McNamara, 2006).


McNamara, T. K. (2006). [Analysis of U.S. Census Projections]. Unpublished raw data.

This analysis was based on the 2006 U.S. Census projections.

According to a 2006 analysis of the Benchmark Study, approximately 9 of every 10 of the respondent organizations have analyzed the demographic make-up of their workforces, to a "moderate" (47%) or "great" (41%) extent (p.4, fig. 2).

According to a 2006 analysis of the Benchmark Study, approximately 9 of every 10 of the respondent organizations have analyzed the demographic make-up of their workforces, to a "moderate" (47%) or "great" (41%) extent (p.4, fig. 2).


Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Kane, K., Smyer, M. A., & Shen, C. (2006). The benchmark study: Summary report (Research Highlight No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 25, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH03_BenchmarkStudy_12-06_002.pdf

"The Benchmark Study" is the first phase in "The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development (NSBSWD)" conducted by the Boston College Center on Aging and Work/Workplace Flexibility. "The Benchmark Study" invited two groups of employers to participate in the study: those who had been recognized as "early adaptors" to the changing age demographics of the workforce, and those who had identified the aging of the workforce as a priority issue for their organizations. Phase II of the NSBSWD then invited approximately 500 U.S. businesses with 50 or more employees to participate in "The National Study." (See research highlights #4 for results from phase II).

According to 2005 projections from the Census Bureau, in 1980, individuals age 50 and above represented 26% of the population; in 2003, they represented 28% of the population; and in 2050, they are projected to represent 37% of the population.

According to 2005 projections from the Census Bureau, in 1980, individuals age 50 and above represented 26% of the population; in 2003, they represented 28% of the population; and in 2050, they are projected to represent 37% of the population.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2005). U.S. Census Bureau, statistical abstract of the United States: 2004-2005. Population. (Section 1, Tables 11-16, pp. 12-19). Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 15, 2005, from http://www.census.gov/prod/www/statistical-abstract-2001_2005.html

"This section presents statistics on the growth, distribution, and characteristics of the U.S. population. The principal source of these data is the U.S. Census Bureau, which conducts a decennial census of population, a monthly population survey, a program of population estimates and projections, and a number of other periodic surveys relating to population characteristics."

A 2006 Congressional Research Service report indicates that in 2000, older persons ages 55-69 "comprised 12% of the total population. Predictions for 2030 increase its proportion to 18%. This 6 percentage point increase is equivalent to just under a 50% growth in the demographics group's share of...

A 2006 Congressional Research Service report indicates that in 2000, older persons ages 55-69 "comprised 12% of the total population. Predictions for 2030 increase its proportion to 18%. This 6 percentage point increase is equivalent to just under a 50% growth in the demographics group's share of the population. In 2050 the proportion of the 55-69 year olds relative to the total population is expected to fall to 15.8%; however, this is still over a 30 % increase from 2000."(p.2)

U.S. Congressional Research Service. The Library of Congress: Issues in Aging: Unemployment and Older Workers (2005, RL32757), by Julie Whittaker. Text in CRS Web. Retrieved September 10, 2006, from http://www.opencrs.com/rpts/RL32757_20050131.pdf

"This report examines how unemployment has a different impact on the older worker. As workers age, negative--but previously temporary--events such as unemployment may push otherwise firmly entrenched workers out of the labor force. While older workers are less likely than others to experience a spell of unemployment, those older workers who do experience unemployment have a higher of withdrawing from the labor market."

According to a 2005 Census Bureau report, in 2003, 24%, 63% and 13% of white persons age 55 and above lived alone, with a spouse and with other persons, respectively.

According to a 2005 Census Bureau report, in 2003, 24%, 63% and 13% of white persons age 55 and above lived alone, with a spouse and with other persons, respectively.

U.S. Census Bureau. (2005). U.S. Census Bureau, statistical abstract of the United States: 2004-2005. Population. (Section 1, Table 54, p. 49). Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 15, 2005, from http://www.census.gov/prod/www/statistical-abstract-2001_2005.html

"This section presents statistics on the growth, distribution, and characteristics of the U.S. population. The principal source of these data is the U.S. Census Bureau, which conducts a decennial census of population, a monthly population survey, a program of population estimates and projections, and a number of other periodic surveys relating to population characteristics."

According to a 2002 report from AARP, between 1900-02, the life expectancy at age 50 was 21.26. In 1997, the life expectancy at age 50 was 29.7.  Between 1900-02, the life expectancy at birth was 49.24. In 1997, the life expectancy at birth was 76.5.

According to a 2002 report from AARP, between 1900-02, the life expectancy at age 50 was 21.26. In 1997, the life expectancy at age 50 was 29.7.  Between 1900-02, the life expectancy at birth was 49.24. In 1997, the life expectancy at birth was 76.5.

AARP. (2002, May). Beyond 50: summary tables and charts. Research report. (Table: Life expectancy). Washington, DC: Gist, J., Figueiredo, C., & Ng-Baumhackl, M. Retrieved July 15, 2005, from http://www.aarp.org/research/reference/statistics/aresearch-import-298.html

"Through its analysis of both the status quo and developing trends, Beyond 50: A Report to the Nation on Economic Security provides readers with an in-depth look at the well-being of more than one-quarter of Americans - the 76 million people age 50 and older in 2000."

According to data from the 2009 National Vital Statistics Report, "in 2007, the average life expectancy at birth for persons born in the United States was 77.9 years, an increase of 1.1 years from 2000 and an increase of 0.2 years from 2006."

According to data from the 2009 National Vital Statistics Report, "in 2007, the average life expectancy at birth for persons born in the United States was 77.9 years, an increase of 1.1 years from 2000 and an increase of 0.2 years from 2006."

QuickStats: Average life expectancy at birth, by race and sex --- United States, 2000, 2006, and 2007. (2009). MMWR Weekly, 58(42), 1185. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5842a7.htm?s_cid=mm5842a7_e   

This analysis is based on data from the 2009 National Vital Statistics Report.

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