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According to a 2014 Pew survey, 56% of adults ages 65 and older now say they use a computer, compared with 89% of 18-29 year olds, 86% of 30-49 year olds and 84% of those aged 50-64.

According to a 2014 Pew survey, 56% of adults ages 65 and older now say they use a computer, compared with 89% of 18-29 year olds, 86% of 30-49 year olds and 84% of those aged 50-64.

Fox, S., & Rainee, L. (2014). The web at 25 in the U.S. part 1: How the internet has woven itself into American life. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/27/part-1-how-the-internet-has-woven-itself-into-american-life/

This survey is based on telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,006 adults living in the continental United States. Telephone interviews were conducted by landline (502) and cell phone (504, including 288 without a landline phone). The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International (PSRAI). Interviews were done in English and Spanish by Princeton Data Source from January 9 to 12, 2014.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "to better understand the extent to which Baby Boomers are proactively preparing themselves to help ensure continued employment, an analysis of the survey responses found that 92 percent of Baby Boomers have taken at least one of the six...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "to better understand the extent to which Baby Boomers are proactively preparing themselves to help ensure continued employment, an analysis of the survey responses found that 92 percent of Baby Boomers have taken at least one of the six steps identified [trying to stay healthy, performing well in their current job, keeping job skills up-to-date, networking, scoping out the employment market, going back to school]. Slightly more than half (52 percent) had taken two steps, 32 percent had taken three steps, 12 percent four steps, and five percent five steps. Only one percent of Baby Boomers have taken all six steps." (p. 36)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 - March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, when asked to rank the changes they most wanted in the next 5-10 years, 82% want to "give back more," while 80% would like to pursue one or more of their "passions," and 75% would like to "make life more meaningful;" 46% would like to make a change in...

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, when asked to rank the changes they most wanted in the next 5-10 years, 82% want to "give back more," while 80% would like to pursue one or more of their "passions," and 75% would like to "make life more meaningful;" 46% would like to make a change in their "professional life". (p. 10)

Thayer, C. (2014). Reflections on life & career. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2014/Reflections-on-Life-and-Career-AARP-res-gen.pdf

The survey was fielded by Woelfel Research, Inc. from May 15-May 29, 2014. A total of 1006 telephone interviews were completed with adults ages 40-59 in the United States. The results were weighted to be nationally representative.

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, 37% of respondants indicated that their co-workers or a boss are resources that they use to help achieve a good life. (p. 14)

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, 37% of respondants indicated that their co-workers or a boss are resources that they use to help achieve a good life. (p. 14)

Thayer, C. (2014). Reflections on life & career. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2014/Reflections-on-Life-and-Career-AARP-res-gen.pdf

The survey was fielded by Woelfel Research, Inc. from May 15-May 29, 2014. A total of 1006 telephone interviews were completed with adults ages 40-59 in the United States. The results were weighted to be nationally representative.

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, among respondants who are currently employed, three-quarters indicate that they love or like their current job (34% love, 43% like), while approximately one-quarter tolerate (19%), dislike (1%), or hate (2%) their jobs. (p. 18)

According to a 2014 survey of adults aged 40-59, among respondants who are currently employed, three-quarters indicate that they love or like their current job (34% love, 43% like), while approximately one-quarter tolerate (19%), dislike (1%), or hate (2%) their jobs. (p. 18)

Thayer, C. (2014). Reflections on life & career. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2014/Reflections-on-Life-and-Career-AARP-res-gen.pdf

The survey was fielded by Woelfel Research, Inc. from May 15-May 29, 2014. A total of 1006 telephone interviews were completed with adults ages 40-59 in the United States. The results were weighted to be nationally representative.

According to a 2014 Gallup survey, 58% of respondants age 45+ indicate that work gives them a sense of identity, compared to 52% of those aged 18-44. In contrast, 39% of workers aged 45+ say that their job is "just what you do", compared to 45% of those aged 18-44.

According to a 2014 Gallup survey, 58% of respondants age 45+ indicate that work gives them a sense of identity, compared to 52% of those aged 18-44. In contrast, 39% of workers aged 45+ say that their job is "just what you do", compared to 45% of those aged 18-44.

Riffkin, R. (2014). In U.S., 55% of workers get sense of identity from their job. U. S.: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/175400/workers-sense-identity-job.aspx

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted Aug. 7-14, 2014, with a random sample of 1,032 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

According to a 2012 AARP analysis of BLS and CPS data, "most older people who are out of the labor force say that they do not want a job (97 percent in December, 2012, a figure that has shown little fluctuation since the recession began)." (p. 6)

According to a 2012 AARP analysis of BLS and CPS data, "most older people who are out of the labor force say that they do not want a job (97 percent in December, 2012, a figure that has shown little fluctuation since the recession began)." (p. 6)

Rix, S. (2013). The employment situation, December 2012: Five years after the start of the great recession. (Fact Sheet No. 276). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2013/the-employment-situation-december-2012-AARP-ppi-econ-sec.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and from the Current Population Survey.

According to a 2013 AARP report, among mid-life and older adults, the proporation who report that they engage in charitable giving is similar across generations. 72% of Boomers (age 48-66) report such giving, compared to 75% of Gen X (age 31-47), and 77% of "Silent" (age 76-83). p. 39

According to a 2013 AARP report, among mid-life and older adults, the proporation who report that they engage in charitable giving is similar across generations. 72% of Boomers (age 48-66) report such giving, compared to 75% of Gen X (age 31-47), and 77% of "Silent" (age 76-83). p. 39

AARP. (2013). Civic engagement among mid-life and older adults: Findings from the 2012 survey on civic engagement. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2012/Civic-Engagement-Among-Mid-Life-and-Older-Adults-Findings-from-the-2012-Survey-on-Civic-Engagement-AARP.pdf

This report is based on a telephone survey conducted by AARP in June 2012, using a random sample of 1,500 adults 45+(including1,000 AARP members).

According to a 2013 AARP survey report, compared to other workers, "a full three-fourths (75%) of non-self-employed older workers report that they are treated no differently based on their age. Another 16 percent feel they are treated worse, and 7 percent say they are treated better."

According to a 2013 AARP survey report, compared to other workers, "a full three-fourths (75%) of non-self-employed older workers report that they are treated no differently based on their age. Another 16 percent feel they are treated worse, and 7 percent say they are treated better."

AARP. (2013). Staying ahead of the curve 2013: AARP multicultural work and career study. perceptions of age discrimination in the workplace -- ages 45-74. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2013/Staying-Ahead-of-the-Curve-2013-AARP-Multicultural-Work-and-Career-Study-Perceptions-of-Age-Discrimination-in-the-Workplace-Ages-45-74-AARP-res-gen.pdf

This telephone survey was fielded in November 2012 and December 2012 with a national sample of 1,502 adults ages 45-74 who were working full-time or part-time, self-employed, or looking for work.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "the percentage of Americans who say the average person becomes old at age 70 or younger is 37% for those currently age 50-54, 32% for those age 55-59, 24% for those age 60-64, and only 15% for those age 65 and...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "the percentage of Americans who say the average person becomes old at age 70 or younger is 37% for those currently age 50-54, 32% for those age 55-59, 24% for those age 60-64, and only 15% for those age 65 and older. Men are more likely to give estimates of 70 or younger for when the average person becomes old than women (34% vs. 17%)." (p.12)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities also cite their health (65%), the need for benefits through an employer such as health insurance (61%), ability to do the job (58%), and job satisfaction (54%) as extremely or very important factors in their decision. Wanting more free time and the retirement plans of spouses and partners are viewed as less important factors (with 38 and 37% respectively designated as very or extremely important)." (p.7)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "62% of adults age 50 and older say their age is not or was not an issue in their work life and career, 17% say their age is or was an asset to their career, and 18% say their age is or was a liability." (p.4)

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "62% of adults age 50 and older say their age is not or was not an issue in their work life and career, 17% say their age is or was an asset to their career, and 18% say their age is or was a liability." (p.4)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, among Americans aged 50 and over who are working, 9 out of 10 who are working and not yet retired report that they are somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs". (p.3)

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, among Americans aged 50 and over who are working, 9 out of 10 who are working and not yet retired report that they are somewhat or very satisfied with their jobs". (p.3)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 AARP survey of older workers, 91% of those who are employed agree with the statement 'I am proud to work for the company that employs me'. Other statements about work-life reported by older workers include: 'I am continuing to grow in my work' (87%), 'my job is an important part...

According to a 2013 AARP survey of older workers, 91% of those who are employed agree with the statement 'I am proud to work for the company that employs me'. Other statements about work-life reported by older workers include: 'I am continuing to grow in my work' (87%), 'my job is an important part of who I am' (83%), 'I plan to stay at my current job until I am ready to fully retire from working' (82%), and 'there is a lot I still plan to accomplish in my work' (79%)". (p2)

AARP. (2013). Staying ahead of the curve 2013: AARP multicultural work and career study. Snapshot of the wants and needs of older workers -- ages 45-74 (revised). Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/econ/2013/Staying-Ahead-of-the-Curve-2013-Snapshot-of-the-Wants-and-Needs-of-Older-Workers-AARP-rsa-econ.pdf

The facts provided in this publication by the AARP were acquired through a telephone survey fielded in November 2012 and December 2012 with a national sample of 1,502 adults ages 45-74 who were working full-time or part-time, self-employed, or looking for work.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, people with bosses who are older than they are are less likely to report that they have cut back on their hours than are people who have younger bosses (9% vs. 23%). People who have an older boss are more likely...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, people with bosses who are older than they are are less likely to report that they have cut back on their hours than are people who have younger bosses (9% vs. 23%). People who have an older boss are more likely than those with a younger boss to consider their age to be an asset to their career (39% vs. 20%). (p.4)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "the view that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today's economy is held by 41% of respondents... A smaller share--29%--say middle-aged adults are having the toughest time, while just 24% say older adults are having the worst of it." (p. 4)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "the view that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today's economy is held by 41% of respondents... A smaller share--29%--say middle-aged adults are having the toughest time, while just 24% say older adults are having the worst of it." (p. 4)

PewResearch Center. (2012). Young, underemployed and optimistic coming of age, slowly, in a tough economy social & demographic trends. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/02/SDT-Youth-and-Economy.pdf

This report is based on findings from a Pew Research Center survey conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, among 2,048 adults nationwide, including 808 young adults (ages 18 to 34). The report also draws on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "more than eight-in-ten (82%) say finding a job is harder for young adults today than it was for their parents' generation. And at least seven-in-ten say it's harder now to save for the future (75%), pay for college (71%) or buy a home (69%)." (p. 1)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "more than eight-in-ten (82%) say finding a job is harder for young adults today than it was for their parents' generation. And at least seven-in-ten say it's harder now to save for the future (75%), pay for college (71%) or buy a home (69%)." (p. 1)

PewResearch Center. (2012). Young, underemployed and optimistic coming of age, slowly, in a tough economy social & demographic trends. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/02/SDT-Youth-and-Economy.pdf

This report is based on findings from a Pew Research Center survey conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, among 2,048 adults nationwide, including 808 young adults (ages 18 to 34). The report also draws on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, the proportion of one-person households grew slightly from 26 percent in 2000 to 27 percent in 2010. About one-third of one-person households had householders who were 65 years and over, compared with 22 percent of all householders." (p. 11)

According to a 2012 report from the US Census Bureau, the proportion of one-person households grew slightly from 26 percent in 2000 to 27 percent in 2010. About one-third of one-person households had householders who were 65 years and over, compared with 22 percent of all householders." (p. 11)

Lofquist, D., Lugaila, T., O'Connell, M., & Feliz, S. (2012). Households and families: 2010. (2010 Census Briefs No. C2010BR-14). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf

This report uses decennial census data primarily for the years 2000 and 2010.

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "as of April 2012, 53% of American adults age 65 and older use the internet or email. Though these adults are still less likely than all other age groups to use the internet, the latest data represent the first time that half of seniors are going online....86% of internet...

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "as of April 2012, 53% of American adults age 65 and older use the internet or email. Though these adults are still less likely than all other age groups to use the internet, the latest data represent the first time that half of seniors are going online....86% of internet users age 65 and older use email, with 48% doing so on a typical day," and "one third (34%) of internet users age 65 and older use social networking sites such as Facebook, and 18% do so on a typical day."

Zickuhr, K., & Madden, M. (2012). Older adults and internet use. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2012/PIP_Older_adults_and_internet_use.pdf

This report is based on the findings of a survey on Americans' use of the internet. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from March 15 to April 3, 2012, among a sample of 2,254 adults, age 18 and older.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "91% of hiring managers say mature workers are reliable." Hiring managers also report that they regard older workers as professional (85%), good listeners (77%), and organized (77%), and that they have a positive work ethic (75%)...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "91% of hiring managers say mature workers are reliable." Hiring managers also report that they regard older workers as professional (85%), good listeners (77%), and organized (77%), and that they have a positive work ethic (75%) and strong leadership/magagerial skills (75%).

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "mature workers' biggest interview mistake is having high salary/ compensation demands (51 percent), followed by overconfidence in their abilities and experience (48 percent)."

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "mature workers' biggest interview mistake is having high salary/ compensation demands (51 percent), followed by overconfidence in their abilities and experience (48 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial is their resistance to taking direction from older management."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other hand, need to improve their writing skills (46 percent), while far fewer mature workers need to do so (9 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while they say Millennial workers are creative (74 percent) and strong networkers (73 percent)."

Adecco Staffing Mature Worker Survey – Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "eighty-five per cent say that workers 65 years and older are just as productive as younger workers and 79 per cent concur that senior workers have the required level of energy and ambition for their jobs."

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "eighty-five per cent say that workers 65 years and older are just as productive as younger workers and 79 per cent concur that senior workers have the required level of energy and ambition for their jobs."

Investors Group. (2012). A little bit older, A little bit wiser: Canada's small business owners admire older workers. Winnepeg, Canada: Investors Group. Retrieved from http://www.investorsgroup.com/en/client-resources/investors-group-news/a-little-bit-older-a-little-bit-wiser

This survey was conducted by Harris/Decima online from September 21-October 14, 2012, with 743 owners or senior financial decision makers of businesses of less than 500 employees. The data was weighted by business size within region to match the profile of businesses of this size in Canada.

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "only 24 per cent of business owners suggest that seniors looking for employment should focus on casual employment opportunities in the retail or service industries. Instead, a majority (56 per cent) recommend they apply for whatever opportunities...

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "only 24 per cent of business owners suggest that seniors looking for employment should focus on casual employment opportunities in the retail or service industries. Instead, a majority (56 per cent) recommend they apply for whatever opportunities interest them...Half (51 per cent) recommend that older workers try to make an arrangement with their current employer before looking elsewhere or suggested reaching out to other employers in their current area of expertise (51 per cent)."

Investors Group. (2012). A little bit older, A little bit wiser: Canada's small business owners admire older workers. Winnepeg, Canada: Investors Group. Retrieved from http://www.investorsgroup.com/en/client-resources/investors-group-news/a-little-bit-older-a-little-bit-wiser

This survey was conducted by Harris/Decima online from September 21-October 14, 2012, with 743 owners or senior financial decision makers of businesses of less than 500 employees. The data was weighted by business size within region to match the profile of businesses of this size in Canada.

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "while 31 per cent of small business owners currently have employment opportunities within their organizations, most (79 per cent) believe it's not likely that the position will be filled by someone older than 65 now, or in the future (64...

According to a 2012 survey of small business owners in Canada, "while 31 per cent of small business owners currently have employment opportunities within their organizations, most (79 per cent) believe it's not likely that the position will be filled by someone older than 65 now, or in the future (64 per cent)...Half (51 per cent) the survey respondents also concede health issues are more likely to affect the attendance or job performance of workers who are seniors. Fifty-five per cent believe they are not as technologically adept as younger workers."

Investors Group. (2012). A little bit older, A little bit wiser: Canada's small business owners admire older workers. Winnepeg, Canada: Investors Group. Retrieved from http://www.investorsgroup.com/en/client-resources/investors-group-news/a-little-bit-older-a-little-bit-wiser

This survey was conducted by Harris/Decima online from September 21-October 14, 2012, with 743 owners or senior financial decision makers of businesses of less than 500 employees. The data was weighted by business size within region to match the profile of businesses of this size in Canada.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study,"long-distance relocations were uncommon following full-time career employment, as less than one in twenty career workers moved to a new Census Division. Moves that involved a change in area or change in residence, however, were...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study,"long-distance relocations were uncommon following full-time career employment, as less than one in twenty career workers moved to a new Census Division. Moves that involved a change in area or change in residence, however, were much more common, with a frequency at the time of transition from career employment of about 9 percent and 15 percent, respectively. The frequency of moves was similar for those who took bridge jobs and those who exited directly." (p. 19)

Cahill, K. E., Giandrea, M. D., & Quinn, J. F. (2012). The relationship between work decisions and location later in life. (BLS Working Paper No. 458). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec120070.pdf

This report uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), an ongoing nationally-representative longitudinal survey of older Americans that began in 1992. The HRS core consists of 5,869 men and 6,783 women

According to a 2011 survey from AARP, among the top dreams for adults age 50+, 38% want to spend time travelling and 15% want to pursue their hobbies and interests, while 13% want to spend time with children, grandchildren family and friends. Around 5% of respondents mention career, job and work among...

According to a 2011 survey from AARP, among the top dreams for adults age 50+, 38% want to spend time travelling and 15% want to pursue their hobbies and interests, while 13% want to spend time with children, grandchildren family and friends. Around 5% of respondents mention career, job and work among their top dreams.

AARP. (2011). Voices of 50+ America: Dreams & challenges. Washington, DC: AARP Research and Strategic Analysis. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/voices-america-dreams-challenges-national.pdf

The data comes from a random digit dial telephone survey conducted by AARP to over 29,000 adults age 50+ across the 50 states between Jan 2-31, 2011. Data presented in the report is based on a national sample of 1000 50+ adults.

According to a 2011 survey of over 2000 workers in the United Kingdom, "fewer than half of workers (46%) aged 65 and above report they have a formal performance appraisal either once a year or more frequently, compared with 65% of all employees. In all, 44% of employees aged 65 and above have not had...

According to a 2011 survey of over 2000 workers in the United Kingdom, "fewer than half of workers (46%) aged 65 and above report they have a formal performance appraisal either once a year or more frequently, compared with 65% of all employees. In all, 44% of employees aged 65 and above have not had a formal performance appraisal in the last two years or never, compared with a survey average of 27%." (p. 4)

CIPD. (2011). Employee outlook: Focus on managing an ageing workforce. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Retrieved from http://www.cipd.co.uk/binaries/Employee%20Outlook%20Focus%20on%20age.pdf

This latest quarterly online survey was conducted by YouGov for the CIPD of 2,004 UK employees from 25 March–6 April 2011. This survey was administered to a panel of more than 285,000 individuals who have agreed to take part in surveys. The sample was selected and weighted to be representative of the UK workforce in relation to sector and size (private, public, voluntary), industry type and full-time/part-time working by gender.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten respondents cited work ethic as one of the big sources of differences between young and old. Asked who has the better work ethic, about three-fourths of respondents said that older people do." (p. 6)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten respondents cited work ethic as one of the big sources of differences between young and old. Asked who has the better work ethic, about three-fourths of respondents said that older people do." (p. 6)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over,"43 percent of workers ages 35 and older said they currently work for someone younger than them. Breaking down age groups, more than half (53 percent) of workers ages 45 and up said they have a boss younger than them, followed by 69...

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over,"43 percent of workers ages 35 and older said they currently work for someone younger than them. Breaking down age groups, more than half (53 percent) of workers ages 45 and up said they have a boss younger than them, followed by 69 percent of workers ages 55 and up."

Careerbuilder. (2010). More than four-in-ten workers over the age of 35 currently work for a younger boss, finds new CareerBuilder survey. Retrieved February 18, 2010, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr554&sd=2/17/2010&ed=12/31/2010&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr554_

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder.com among 5,231 employees (employed full-time; not self-employed; non-government) ages 18 and over between November 5 and November 23, 2009

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older has nearly doubled  -- from 22% to 42% over the past year [2009-2010]. Half (47%) of internet users ages 50-64 and one in four (26%) users age 65 and older now use social networking sites." (p. 2)

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older has nearly doubled  -- from 22% to 42% over the past year [2009-2010]. Half (47%) of internet users ages 50-64 and one in four (26%) users age 65 and older now use social networking sites." (p. 2)

Madden, M. (2010). Older adults and social media. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Older-Adults-and-Social-Media.aspx

This report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans' use of the internet. The results in this report are primarily based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older.

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "one in five (20%) adults ages 50-64 say they use social networking sites on a typical day, up from 10% one year ago. Likewise, 13% of online adults ages 65 and older log on to social networking sites, compared with just 4% who did so in 2009." (p. 3)

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "one in five (20%) adults ages 50-64 say they use social networking sites on a typical day, up from 10% one year ago. Likewise, 13% of online adults ages 65 and older log on to social networking sites, compared with just 4% who did so in 2009." (p. 3)

Madden, M. (2010). Older adults and social media. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Older-Adults-and-Social-Media.aspx

This report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans' use of the internet. The results in this report are primarily based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older.

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "92% of those ages 50-64 and 89% of those ages 65 and older send or read email and more than half of each group exchanges email messages on a typical day. Online news gathering also ranks highly in the daily media habits of older adults; 76% of internet users ages 50-64...

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "92% of those ages 50-64 and 89% of those ages 65 and older send or read email and more than half of each group exchanges email messages on a typical day. Online news gathering also ranks highly in the daily media habits of older adults; 76% of internet users ages 50-64 get news online, and 42% do so on a typical day.  Among internet users ages 65 and older, 62% look for news online and 34% do so on a typical day." (p. 4)

Madden, M. (2010). Older adults and social media. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Older-Adults-and-Social-Media.aspx

This report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans' use of the internet. The results in this report are primarily based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, while respondents of all ages reported using the Internet to search for jobs, "younger workers used Internet social networking sites more frequently than older workers: 13% of older unemployed workers reported using online...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, while respondents of all ages reported using the Internet to search for jobs, "younger workers used Internet social networking sites more frequently than older workers: 13% of older unemployed workers reported using online social networking sites to find a job, compared to 28% of younger workers. Of those who used the Internet, the most commonly used tool by older workers was online bulletin boards for companies (56%), while the most common tool used by younger job seekers was Facebook (51%). (fig. 4, p. 11)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis by the Pew Research Center, among older adults who are grandparents, 29% said that what they value most about getting older is spending time with grandchildren...Women ages 65-74 are among the most likely to say they value time with their grandkids above all else. Fully...

According to a 2010 analysis by the Pew Research Center, among older adults who are grandparents, 29% said that what they value most about getting older is spending time with grandchildren...Women ages 65-74 are among the most likely to say they value time with their grandkids above all else. Fully 31% say this is what they value most. This compares with 19% of men ages 65-74." (p. 4-5)

Livingston, G., & Parker, K. (2010). Since the start of the great recession, more children raised by grandparents. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/764-children-raised-by-grandparents.pdf

This analysis is based on US Census data and on the results of a Pew Research Center Social & Demographic Trends survey on aging among a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults .

According to a 2009 survey on internet use, young people are much more likely than older adults to use social networks. 75% of online adults aged 18-24 have a profile on a social network site, compared to 57% of those aged 25-34, 30% on those 35-44, 19% of those aged 45-54, 10% of 55-64 year olds,...

According to a 2009 survey on internet use, young people are much more likely than older adults to use social networks. 75% of online adults aged 18-24 have a profile on a social network site, compared to 57% of those aged 25-34, 30% on those 35-44, 19% of those aged 45-54, 10% of 55-64 year olds, and 7% of those 65 and older. (p. 2)

Lenhart, A. (2009). Pew internet project data memo [adult social networking]. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Adult_social_networking_data_memo_FINAL.pdf

The main findings on adults' usage of social network sites come from a survey of 2,251 adults between April 8 to May 11, 2008, among a sample of adults, 18 and older. Some 328 respondents in that survey were social network users and the margin of error in that subsample is plus or minus 6 percentage points.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 21)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 21)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "among 18 to 29 year-olds, about half say they feel their age, while about quarter say they feel older than their age and another quarter say they feel younger. By contrast, among adults 65 and older, fully 60% say they feel younger than their age, compared with 32% who...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "among 18 to 29 year-olds, about half say they feel their age, while about quarter say they feel older than their age and another quarter say they feel younger. By contrast, among adults 65 and older, fully 60% say they feel younger than their age, compared with 32% who say they feel exactly their age and just 3% who say they feel older than their age. (p. 21)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "fully 83% of adults ages 65 and older describe themselves as retired, but the word means different things to different people. Just three-quarters of adults (76%) 65 and older fit the classic stereotype of the retiree who has completely left the working world behind....

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "fully 83% of adults ages 65 and older describe themselves as retired, but the word means different things to different people. Just three-quarters of adults (76%) 65 and older fit the classic stereotype of the retiree who has completely left the working world behind. An additional 8% say they are retired but are working part time, while 2% say they are retired but working full time and 3% say they are retired but looking for work. The remaining 11% of the 65-and-older population describe themselves as still in the labor force, though not all of them have jobs." (p. 9)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "just 5% of adults under age 30 say that where young and old differ most is in their work ethic. But twice as many--10%--of those 30 and older point to this as a major difference." (p. 41)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "just 5% of adults under age 30 say that where young and old differ most is in their work ethic. But twice as many--10%--of those 30 and older point to this as a major difference." (p. 41)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "full-time retirees and working older adults are about as likely to say they are very or pretty happy with their lives (75% vs. 70%)."(p. 88)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "full-time retirees and working older adults are about as likely to say they are very or pretty happy with their lives (75% vs. 70%)."(p. 88)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "when asked whether they feel old, 69% of all adults 65 and older say they do not; just 28% say they do. Among those ages 65-74, only 21% say they feel old. Feeling old is somewhat more common for those 75 and older: 35% say they feel old. But even so, a solid majority...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "when asked whether they feel old, 69% of all adults 65 and older say they do not; just 28% say they do. Among those ages 65-74, only 21% say they feel old. Feeling old is somewhat more common for those 75 and older: 35% say they feel old. But even so, a solid majority (61%) in this age group says that they don’t feel old." (p. 21)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009. 

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "only about a quarter of the public (26%) says there are strong conflicts these days between young people and older people." However, respondents perceive that there are differences between younger and older generations, "including in the...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "only about a quarter of the public (26%) says there are strong conflicts these days between young people and older people." However, respondents perceive that there are differences between younger and older generations, "including in the way they use new technology (87% say very or somewhat different); their taste in music (86%); their work ethic (80%); their moral values (80%); the respect they show others (78%); their political views (74%); their attitudes toward different races and groups (70%); and their religious beliefs (68%)." (p. 3-4)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "nearly three-quarters (74%) believe that older adults have the superior work ethic. Moreover, this belief bridges the generational divide: Young people agree with their parents' and grandparents' generations that older adults have...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "nearly three-quarters (74%) believe that older adults have the superior work ethic. Moreover, this belief bridges the generational divide: Young people agree with their parents' and grandparents' generations that older adults have a better work ethic (68% for those under 30 vs. 73% for those 50 and older). It's the 30- somethings and those in early middle age who appear to offer the harshest assessment of young people: About eight-in-ten of those ages 30 to 49 judge the older generation to have better attitudes toward work and a job." (p. 8)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "by a ratio of more than two-to-one, young people are viewed as being more tolerant of races and groups different from their own than the older generation (47% vs. 19%). Again, the generations are in general agreement: a 55% majority of young...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "by a ratio of more than two-to-one, young people are viewed as being more tolerant of races and groups different from their own than the older generation (47% vs. 19%). Again, the generations are in general agreement: a 55% majority of young adults say their generation is more tolerant, while somewhat more than a third (37%) of all adults 50 and older share that view." (p. 8)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "about seven-in-ten adults...believe the older generation is more respectful of others (71%), an assessment that is made by 67% of respondents younger than 30 and 69% of those 50 and older. ...Early middle-aged adults and those slightly younger...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "about seven-in-ten adults...believe the older generation is more respectful of others (71%), an assessment that is made by 67% of respondents younger than 30 and 69% of those 50 and older. ...Early middle-aged adults and those slightly younger appear to offer the harshest assessment of young people: About three-quarters of those 30 to 49 say the older generation is more respectful. (p. 8)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

In a 2009 report on a survey of HR managers of US state agencies, "late-career employees were perceived most positively by state agencies with regard to having low turnover rates, having a strong work ethic, being reliable, and being loyal to the agency in comparison to the early- and mid-career employees....

In a 2009 report on a survey of HR managers of US state agencies, "late-career employees were perceived most positively by state agencies with regard to having low turnover rates, having a strong work ethic, being reliable, and being loyal to the agency in comparison to the early- and mid-career employees. Mid-career employees were considered most likely to want to lead and supervise others, to be productive, to be creative, and to take initiative in comparison to the early- and late-career employees. Early-career employees were perceived the least positively in comparison to the other career stages for all ten of the positive attributes." (fig. 1, p. 4)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "late-career employees were perceived to be the most resistant to change, reluctant to travel, reluctant to try new technologies, burned out, and difficult to train....

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "late-career employees were perceived to be the most resistant to change, reluctant to travel, reluctant to try new technologies, burned out, and difficult to train. Mid-career employees were perceived to take a lot of time from work to deal with personal or family issues, and early-career employees were perceived to often look outside the agency for new career opportunities." (fig. 2, p. 5)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of public-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are reliable and productive. In...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of public-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are reliable and productive. In contrast, a larger percentage of private-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are burned out and difficult to train." (fig. 3, p. 6)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that it was true for many or most of their mid-career employees that they want to lead and supervise others...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that it was true for many or most of their mid-career employees that they want to lead and supervise others in comparison to public-sector organizations." (fig. 4, p. 7)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that many or most of their late-career employees want to lead and supervise." (fig. 5, p. 8)

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that many or most of their late-career employees want to lead and supervise." (fig. 5, p. 8)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "survey respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 2)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "survey respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 2)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "About three-quarters of participants from all generations described Gen Y as "very comfortable" working with people of different ethnicities, cultures and sexual orientations. In contrast, only a quarter of those surveyed perceived Boomers...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "About three-quarters of participants from all generations described Gen Y as "very comfortable" working with people of different ethnicities, cultures and sexual orientations. In contrast, only a quarter of those surveyed perceived Boomers as having that degree of comfort working with different ethnicities and cultures, and only 17 percent saw the older generation as very comfortable with workmates of another sexual orientation." (fig 3.1, p. 6)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "forty-six percent of Boomers had a stay-at-home mother, and only 56 percent had a mother who worked throughout their childhood years. But the numbers nearly reversed for Gen Y, with 74 percent growing up with a working mother and only 26...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "forty-six percent of Boomers had a stay-at-home mother, and only 56 percent had a mother who worked throughout their childhood years. But the numbers nearly reversed for Gen Y, with 74 percent growing up with a working mother and only 26 percent having a mom who stayed at home. Nearly 90 percent of both generations had fathers who worked full-time." (fig. 4.1, p. 18)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Eighty-seven percent of Boomers rate flexible work arrangements as important. Similar numbers of Boomers prize autonomy in their work (91%). Additionally, 75 percent are motivated to work harder by having the ability to work remotely at...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Eighty-seven percent of Boomers rate flexible work arrangements as important. Similar numbers of Boomers prize autonomy in their work (91%). Additionally, 75 percent are motivated to work harder by having the ability to work remotely at their discretion." (p. 39)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 Gallup survey, "worry about money advances slightly from the 18- to 29-year-old age group -- 39% of whom worried about money "yesterday" -- through the 40 to 49 age group, where it peaks at 46%. From age 50 on, however, worry decreases steadily, reaching a low of only 17% among those...

According to a 2009 Gallup survey, "worry about money advances slightly from the 18- to 29-year-old age group -- 39% of whom worried about money "yesterday" -- through the 40 to 49 age group, where it peaks at 46%. From age 50 on, however, worry decreases steadily, reaching a low of only 17% among those 70 to 89."

Newport, F. (2009). Worry about money peaks with forty-somethings: Drops off significantly for older Americans. United States: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/116131/Worry-Money-Peaks-Forty-Somethings.aspx

Results are based on telephone interviews with 11,361 national adults, aged 18 and older, conducted Feb. 1-24, 2009, as part of Gallup Poll Daily tracking. For results based on the total sample of national adults, one can say with 95% confidence that the maximum margin of sampling error is 2 percentage points.

According to a 2009 Metlife survey of workers and job seekers aged 55-70, "overall only 36% of respondents have pursued additional skills or training that are required for their jobs or might benefit them in their jobs or their future employability." (p. 5)

According to a 2009 Metlife survey of workers and job seekers aged 55-70, "overall only 36% of respondents have pursued additional skills or training that are required for their jobs or might benefit them in their jobs or their future employability." (p. 5)

MetLife. (2009). Buddy, can you spare a job? the new realities of the job market for aging baby boomers. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/mmi-buddy-can-you-spare-job.pdf

Quantitative information was obtained from a survey of 1,242 U.S. residents, ages 55 to 70, who were working or seeking work, or who reported being retired because they could not find work. An oversample was surveyed to achieve a significant amount of job seekers. The survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive in May 2009.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study, "the cumulative probability of being disabled grows steadily from age 55 to 64, increasing from 21 to 43 percent....The rate more than doubles as the cohort ages nine years [from age 55 to 61], and increases 7 percentage points...

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study, "the cumulative probability of being disabled grows steadily from age 55 to 64, increasing from 21 to 43 percent....The rate more than doubles as the cohort ages nine years [from age 55 to 61], and increases 7 percentage points (or about 18 percent) as the cohort ages from 62 to 64. Disability rates are also significantly higher for women than men, and grow with age. By age 64, for example, women are 13 percent more likely to have been disabled than men (45 percent vs. 40 percent). (p. 20)

Johnson, R. W., Favreault, M., & Mommaerts, C. (2009). Work ability and the social insurance safety net in the years prior to retirement (Working Paper No. WP 2009-28). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Working_Papers/wp_2009-28.pdf

Data for this study come from the University of Michigan's Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal survey of Americans age 51 and older. The sample is restricted to 4,661 noninstitutionalized respondents age 51 to 55 in 1992, who we follow until they reach age 64. It includes 1,820 respondents who are disabled at some point between age 51 and 64.

According to a 2009 Pew Research Center Social & Demographic Trends telephone survey, "fully 78% of adults ages 65 and older who live in the West say they don't feel old, compared with 67% of older adults who live in the rest of the country."

According to a 2009 Pew Research Center Social & Demographic Trends telephone survey, "fully 78% of adults ages 65 and older who live in the West say they don't feel old, compared with 67% of older adults who live in the rest of the country."

Parker, K. (2009). Go west, old man. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/pubs/738/go-west-older-adults-feel-young-at-heart#prcjump

This report is based on a 2009 Pew Research Center Social & Demographic Trends telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults.

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, "employees of the Traditionalist generation (ages 63 and older) are the most engaged in their jobs overall, with an 84% employee engagement level. The engagement levels of the other groups are within a relatively narrow range of 77%-80%," with baby boomers at...

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, "employees of the Traditionalist generation (ages 63 and older) are the most engaged in their jobs overall, with an 84% employee engagement level. The engagement levels of the other groups are within a relatively narrow range of 77%-80%," with baby boomers at 77%, Generation X at 78%, and Generation Y at 80%.

WorldatWork. (2008). Employee engagement differences across generations relatively small. Retrieved May 20, 2008, from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=25544

Sirota Survey Intelligence conducted a major study of cross-generational attitudes of more than 300,000 workers in more than 50 organizations that the employee attitude research firm surveyed during 2006 and 2007. The research included employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs, pride in working for their employers, whether they would recommend their organizations as a place to work, and their willingness to put forth extra effort.

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, traditionalists (age 63 and older) with between two and five years tenure have an engagement level of 85%--10 percentage points higher than that for Generation Y and Baby Boomers (75%), and 9 percentage points higher than that for Generation X (76%)" with comparable...

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, traditionalists (age 63 and older) with between two and five years tenure have an engagement level of 85%--10 percentage points higher than that for Generation Y and Baby Boomers (75%), and 9 percentage points higher than that for Generation X (76%)" with comparable tenure.

WorldatWork. (2008). Employee engagement differences across generations relatively small. Retrieved May 20, 2008, from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=25544

Sirota Survey Intelligence conducted a major study of cross-generational attitudes of more than 300,000 workers in more than 50 organizations that the employee attitude research firm surveyed during 2006 and 2007. The research included employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs, pride in working for their employers, whether they would recommend their organizations as a place to work, and their willingness to put forth extra effort.

A 2008 analysis of a study of couples and careers "reveals that one in two older workers (those aged 50 and above) have a dependent child in the household and one in five of these workers have an adult child in the household." (fig.3, p. 3)

A 2008 analysis of a study of couples and careers "reveals that one in two older workers (those aged 50 and above) have a dependent child in the household and one in five of these workers have an adult child in the household." (fig.3, p. 3)


Sweet, S., & Joggerst, M. (2008). The interlocking careers of older workers and their adult children (Issue Brief No. 14). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB14_InterlockingCareers.pdf

"Many findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of analysis of data from the Statistical Abstracts of the United States, the Cornell Couples and Careers Study (interviews with middle class dual earner couples in 1998-2001), and other sources relevant to family expenses." (p. 1)

According to a 2008 survey on internet use among workers, "employed internet users ages 18-29 are more than twice as likely to blog when compared with 30-49 year olds (20% vs. 9%). However, young adults are no more likely to report at-work tending to their blog; just 2% say they blog from work. Blog...

According to a 2008 survey on internet use among workers, "employed internet users ages 18-29 are more than twice as likely to blog when compared with 30-49 year olds (20% vs. 9%). However, young adults are no more likely to report at-work tending to their blog; just 2% say they blog from work. Blog reading is also most prevalent among younger generations of employed internet users. One in three internet-using employees (33%) say they have read someone else's blog or online journal, and 11% report at least some at-work reading. However, among young working adults, 46% are blog readers, compared with 33% of 30-49 year olds and 25% of employed internet users ages 50-64. At-work blog reading is equally prevalent among all of these groups."

Madden, M., & Jones, S. (2008). Networked workers. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewresearch.org/pubs/966/networked-workers

April 2008 results based on a sample of 807 "employed email users." The 2008 sample includes those who may use personal accounts for work-related email.

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "approximately one-quarter (26%) of older workers report that they have difficulty keeping up with the new technology required to do their job, and a similar proportion (29%) express resistance to learning new skills at this stage of their careers)."...

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "approximately one-quarter (26%) of older workers report that they have difficulty keeping up with the new technology required to do their job, and a similar proportion (29%) express resistance to learning new skills at this stage of their careers)." (p. 41)

Groeneman, S. (2008). Staying ahead of the curve 2007: The AARP work and career study. Washington, D.C.: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/work_career_08.pdf

Interviews were completed for a nationally representative sample of workers ages 45 to 74, including those who are currently employed and those who are unemployed but looking for work. 1500 telephone interviews were conducted from April 13 through May 21, 2007. Additional interviews were completed with African Americans and Hispanics.

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "nearly half (46%) of older Hispanic workers say they have difficulty keeping up with technology compared to just one in four (25%) whites and about three in ten (31%) African American workers." (p. 101)

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "nearly half (46%) of older Hispanic workers say they have difficulty keeping up with technology compared to just one in four (25%) whites and about three in ten (31%) African American workers." (p. 101)

Groeneman, S. (2008). Staying ahead of the curve 2007: The AARP work and career study. Washington, D.C.: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/work_career_08.pdf

Interviews were completed for a nationally representative sample of workers ages 45 to 74, including those who are currently employed and those who are unemployed but looking for work. 1500 telephone interviews were conducted from April 13 through May 21, 2007. Additional interviews were completed with African Americans and Hispanics.

A 2008 analysis of National Health Interview Survey data shows that in 2000, 21.2% of non-institutionalized men aged 50-54 had an activity limitation, compared to 24.3% of men aged 55-59 and 29.3% of men aged 60-64. (p. 2)

A 2008 analysis of National Health Interview Survey data shows that in 2000, 21.2% of non-institutionalized men aged 50-54 had an activity limitation, compared to 24.3% of men aged 55-59 and 29.3% of men aged 60-64. (p. 2)

Munnell, A. H., Soto, M., & Golub-Sass, F. (2008). Are older men healthy enough to work? (Issue Brief No. 8-17). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/ib_8-17.pdf

This brief uses the National Health Interview Survey to estimate trends in disability-free life expectancy for men at age 50.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that among those aged 18-29, 44% have never left their hometowns, compared with 35% of those aged 30-49, and 37% of Americans ages 50-64 and those aged 65 and older. (p. 7) Two-thirds of young adults, ages 18-29, have not lived outside their state of birth, but they...

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that among those aged 18-29, 44% have never left their hometowns, compared with 35% of those aged 30-49, and 37% of Americans ages 50-64 and those aged 65 and older. (p. 7) Two-thirds of young adults, ages 18-29, have not lived outside their state of birth, but they also are the most likely to say that they probably will move within five years. Among all older age groups, about 55% have never lived outside their birth state (p. 11)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that older Americans are more likely than younger ones to have lived in four or more states. Looking at the combined impact of age and gender, 25% of men and 15% of women ages 50 and older say they have lived in four or more states. (p. 13)

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that older Americans are more likely than younger ones to have lived in four or more states. Looking at the combined impact of age and gender, 25% of men and 15% of women ages 50 and older say they have lived in four or more states. (p. 13)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that about half of all Americans ages 30-49 (51%) say job or business opportunities are a major reason they moved at least once in their lives, compared to 45% of those aged 50-64 and 33% of those aged 65+. (p. 15)

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that about half of all Americans ages 30-49 (51%) say job or business opportunities are a major reason they moved at least once in their lives, compared to 45% of those aged 50-64 and 33% of those aged 65+. (p. 15)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that "one-in-three Americans who have moved at least once did so within the past five years. Two-thirds of movers ages 18-29, the prime moving years, say they have relocated within the past five years. That is double the share of recent movers among Americans ages...

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that "one-in-three Americans who have moved at least once did so within the past five years. Two-thirds of movers ages 18-29, the prime moving years, say they have relocated within the past five years. That is double the share of recent movers among Americans ages 30-49 and more than triple the share of recent movers among Americans ages 50-64. (p. 23)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

In a 2008 study on substance use problems, it was found that "problem use was greater among younger workers ages 18-29 years, with more than half of these workers reporting one of the four types of use [illicit drug use only, problem drinking only, heavy drinking only, or both drug use and problem/heavy...

In a 2008 study on substance use problems, it was found that "problem use was greater among younger workers ages 18-29 years, with more than half of these workers reporting one of the four types of use [illicit drug use only, problem drinking only, heavy drinking only, or both drug use and problem/heavy drinking]. Although 30-49 year olds had a lower rate of substance-use problems, 4 out of every 10 male workers in this age group reported problem use". Among workers aged 50-64, 16% of men reported problem drinking. (p. 917)

Waehrer, G. M., Zaloshnja, E., Miller, T., & Galvin, D. (2008). Substance-use problems: Are uninsured workers at greater risk? Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 69(6), 915-923.

This study used data from the 2002-2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The NSDUH is an annual survey of approximately 70,000 people conducted by SAMHSA. (p. 916)

According to a 2008 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the length of time a worker remains with the same employer increases with the age at which the worker began the job." Among workers born between 1957-1964, "of the jobs that workers began when they were ages 18 to 22, 72 percent of those...

According to a 2008 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the length of time a worker remains with the same employer increases with the age at which the worker began the job." Among workers born between 1957-1964, "of the jobs that workers began when they were ages 18 to 22, 72 percent of those jobs ended in less than a year and 94 percent ended in fewer than 5 years. Among jobs started by workers when they were ages 38 to 42, 31 percent ended in less than a year and 65 percent ended in fewer than 5 years. " 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). Number of jobs held, labor market activity, and earnings growth among the youngest baby boomers: Results from a longitudinal survey summary. Retrieved June 30, 2008, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsoy.nr0.htm

These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey of 9,964 men and women who were ages 14 to 22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 41 to 50 when interviewed most recently in 2006-07. These respondents were born in the years 1957 to 1964, the later years of the "baby boom" that occurred in the United States from 1946 to 1964.

A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control indicates that "the percentage of adults reporting insufficient rest or sleep every day during the preceding 30 days generally declined with age. The percentage was highest among persons aged 25--34 years (13.8%) and lowest among persons aged 65 or...

A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control indicates that "the percentage of adults reporting insufficient rest or sleep every day during the preceding 30 days generally declined with age. The percentage was highest among persons aged 25--34 years (13.8%) and lowest among persons aged 65 or more years (7.4%)." (Table 1)

Perceived insufficient rest or sleep among adults --- United States, 2008.(2009). MMWR Weekly, 58(42), 1175-1179. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5842a2.htm

This report is based on data from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population aged ?18 years, which is conducted by state health departments in collaboration with CDC.

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 46.7% of employers report  that older workers (late career) are more likely than employees at mid-life (mid career) and young employees (early career) to have more skills than are needed for a job.  36% of employers...

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 46.7% of employers report  that older workers (late career) are more likely than employees at mid-life (mid career) and young employees (early career) to have more skills than are needed for a job.  36% of employers feel that older workers are more likely to want to lead and supervise than employees at the other two career stages.*



*Shen, C. (2007). [Analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce]. Unpublished raw data.

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). The 21st century multi-generational workplace (Issue Brief No. 09). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB09_MultiGenWorkplace_001.pdf

In this Issue Brief, we explore how age “matters” at the workplace; how perspectives about age differ according to chronological age, generation, life state and carreer stage; and the implications for managers who supervise young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older adult employees.

According to analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 15.8% of employers report the perception that their older (late career) workers are reluctant to try new technologies, compared to under 7% reporting this perception about younger workers.

According to analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 15.8% of employers report the perception that their older (late career) workers are reluctant to try new technologies, compared to under 7% reporting this perception about younger workers.

Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

"This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older)." (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers respond that is it "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger professional networks (46.3%) and client networks (44.4%).  Fewer than 30% of employers feel that it...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers respond that is it "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger professional networks (46.3%) and client networks (44.4%).  Fewer than 30% of employers feel that it is very true that their younger (early and mid-career) counterparts have such networks .


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

"This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older)." (p. 1)

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers were more likely to report the perception that late-career employees were reluctant to try new technology (44.0%), were more likely to be burned out (37.7%), and were more likely to be reluctant...

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers were more likely to report the perception that late-career employees were reluctant to try new technology (44.0%), were more likely to be burned out (37.7%), and were more likely to be reluctant to travel (28.1%), compared to their perceptions about early- or mid-career employees. (p. 21)


Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, similar percentages of employers responded that it is "very true" that late-career employees take initiative (32.1%) as did those who reported that this is "very true" for early-career and mid-career...

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, similar percentages of employers responded that it is "very true" that late-career employees take initiative (32.1%) as did those who reported that this is "very true" for early-career and mid-career employees, with 30.7% and 34.5% respectively. (p. 8)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

According to a 2007 national study, 20.7% of employers responded that their late-career employees have high rates of absenteeism due to illness, compared to 16.9% of mid-career and 26.5% of early-career employees. (p. 20)

According to a 2007 national study, 20.7% of employers responded that their late-career employees have high rates of absenteeism due to illness, compared to 16.9% of mid-career and 26.5% of early-career employees. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

According to a 2007 national study, late-career employees are thought to be less likely to take a lot of time from work to deal with personal of family issues, such as child care of eldercare compared to mid- and early-career employees. 26.9% of employers reported that it is "true/very true" that late...

According to a 2007 national study, late-career employees are thought to be less likely to take a lot of time from work to deal with personal of family issues, such as child care of eldercare compared to mid- and early-career employees. 26.9% of employers reported that it is "true/very true" that late career employees want to take time off for family care, compared to 33.9% for mid- and 29.6% for early-career. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% that is was "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with co-workers of other generations.  For early career employees, 20.8% of employers reported this concern, compared to 15.2% for mid-career...

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% that is was "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with co-workers of other generations.  For early career employees, 20.8% of employers reported this concern, compared to 15.2% for mid-career and  and 20.7% for late-career employees. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% indicated that it is "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with supervisors of other generations.  For early career employees, 21.6% of employers reported this concern, compared to...

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% indicated that it is "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with supervisors of other generations.  For early career employees, 21.6% of employers reported this concern, compared to 17.7% for mid-career and and 22.4% for late-career employees. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Approximately 25% of employers responding to a 2007 national survey stated that it is "true/very true" that early-career  (26.5%) and late-career (25.3%) employees are difficult to train.  For mid-career employees, 19.7% reported that this concern. (p. 20)

Approximately 25% of employers responding to a 2007 national survey stated that it is "true/very true" that early-career  (26.5%) and late-career (25.3%) employees are difficult to train.  For mid-career employees, 19.7% reported that this concern. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p....

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

According to a 2007 AARP report, 36.5% of workers 62 and older work in a setting that requires interpersonal skills, compared with 39.6% of workers ages 50-61, 36% of workers 26-49, and 20.6% of workers 25 and younger. (Table 3, p. 21)

According to a 2007 AARP report, 36.5% of workers 62 and older work in a setting that requires interpersonal skills, compared with 39.6% of workers ages 50-61, 36% of workers 26-49, and 20.6% of workers 25 and younger. (Table 3, p. 21)

Johnson, R. W., Mermin, G., & Resseger, M. (2007). Employment at older ages and the changing nature of work. Washington D.C.: AARP. Retrieved February 18, 2008 from http://www.aarp.org/research/work/employment/2007_20_work.html

This paper examines employment trends and the challenges older adults face in the workplace.The study used detailed occupational characteristics from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to examine job demands. It linked this information to individual workers in the March 1971 and March 2006 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees in a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with the following perceptions about older workers,"the...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees in a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with the following perceptions about older workers,"the responses are significantly more negative with each successive generation, from Traditionalists to Generation Y: the ability of older workers to serve as mentors; seeing older workers as reliable; deeming them to be more productive than younger workers; seeing them as adaptable to new technology; eager for training; and flexible". (Fig 2. p. 4)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, "the Baby...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, "the Baby Boom Generation agrees significantly less than do the other three groups that older workers are "respected," with no significant differences among the responses of the other three groups. Those from Generation X agree significantly less than those from the other three groups that older workers are interested in being promoted. In terms of perceiving that older workers are "just as likely to be promoted" as younger workers, the two older generations' responses did not differ significantly, however both the Traditionalists Generation and the Baby Boom Generation agree with this statement significantly less than those from generations X and Y do." (fig. 4, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

A 2007 report on a suvery of employees in a national retail chian, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of employee engagement, employees from the three older generations who perceived equal...

A 2007 report on a suvery of employees in a national retail chian, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of employee engagement, employees from the three older generations who perceived equal promotion opportunities for older workers ranked significantly higher in employee engagement than those who did not. In comparison, the youngest group of employees, those from generation Y, reported significantly lower levels of employee engagement when they perceived workers over 55 had the same opportunities for promotion as younger workers. (fig. 5, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

In a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chaain, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of psychological well-being, employees among the two older generations who perceive...

In a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chaain, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of psychological well-being, employees among the two older generations who perceive equal opportunities for older workers scored significantly higher in well-being than those who perceive an unfair advantage for younger workers. (Fig. 6, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

According to a 2007 analysis of data gathered in a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when asked about whether or not they agreed that older workers were respected, were interested in promotion, or were like to get a promotion, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, and Traditionalists...

According to a 2007 analysis of data gathered in a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when asked about whether or not they agreed that older workers were respected, were interested in promotion, or were like to get a promotion, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, and Traditionalists all agreed the most that older workers were respected.  Gen. X and Gen. Y believed that older workers were more likely to be promoted than they were interested in promotions, and Baby Boomers and Traditionalists believed that olders workers were just as likely to be promoted as they were intersted in promotion.  (Fig. 4, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, the older...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, the older generations are more positive in their responses regarding older employees' ability to work well with younger supervisors and to be loyal to the company. (fig. 3, p. 4)

James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

The 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" reports that "two-thirds of the employers surveyed said an older employee or prospect is neither more nor less attractive than someone younger." (p. 4)

The 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" reports that "two-thirds of the employers surveyed said an older employee or prospect is neither more nor less attractive than someone younger." (p. 4)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes towards Older Workers," 51% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more costly than their younger counterparts, compared with 40% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 39% of...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes towards Older Workers," 51% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more costly than their younger counterparts, compared with 40% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 39% of employers with <100 employees. (Table 2, p. 4)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers," 46% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more costly than their younger counterparts, compared with 38% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 36% of employers...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers," 46% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more costly than their younger counterparts, compared with 38% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 36% of employers with <100 employees. (Table 2, p. 4)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 46% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more productive than their younger counterparts, compared with 58% of employers with 100-1000 employees and ...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 46% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more productive than their younger counterparts, compared with 58% of employers with 100-1000 employees and  61% of employers with <100 employees.(Table 1, p.2)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers," 17% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more attractive than their younger counterparts, compared with 23% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 28%...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers," 17% of employers with 1000+ employees said that white-collar workers ages 55 and over were more attractive than their younger counterparts, compared with 23% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 28% of employers with <100 employees.(Table 3, p.5)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 14% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more attractive than their younger counterparts, compared with 15% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 16%...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 14% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more attractive than their younger counterparts, compared with 15% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 16% of employers with <100 employees.(Table 3, p.5)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 36% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more productive than their younger counterparts, compared with 46% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 35%...

In the 2006 "Center for Retirement Research Survey of Employer Attitudes Towards Older Workers" 36% of employers with 1000+ employees said that rank-and-file workers ages 55 and over were more productive than their younger counterparts, compared with 46% of employers with 100-1000 employees and 35% of employers with <100 employees.(Table 1, p. 2)

Munnell, A. H., Sass, S., & Soto, M. (2006). Employer attitudes towards older workers: Survey results. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/wob_3.pdf

"To get a better understanding of the employment prospects of older workers, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) conducted a survey of 400 private sector employers. These employers were asked to evaluate the relative productivity and cost of white-collar and rank-and-file workers age 55 and older and whether, on balance, older employees or job candidates were more of less attractive than their younger counterparts."

According to a 2006 analysis of Health and Retirement Survey data, among adults who were age 51-61 in 1992, during the 10-year period ending in 2002 "More than 4 in 10 are diagnosed with major new medical conditions, including heart problems, cancer, serious lung problems, diabetes, strokes, and psychiatric...

According to a 2006 analysis of Health and Retirement Survey data, among adults who were age 51-61 in 1992, during the 10-year period ending in 2002 "More than 4 in 10 are diagnosed with major new medical conditions, including heart problems, cancer, serious lung problems, diabetes, strokes, and psychiatric problems. About one-third develop work disabilities -- health problems that curtail employment -- and about 7 percent develop disabilities severe enough to limit bathing, dressing, or eating. (p. 3)

Johnson, R. W., Mermin, G. B. T., & Uccello, C. E. (2006). How secure are retirement nest eggs? (An Issue in Brief No. 45). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/ib_45.pdf

This brief examines different types of negative events that can strike near retirement. It reports the incidence of widowhood, divorce, job layoffs, disability, and various medical conditions over a 10-year period, and estimates their impact on household wealth. Data come from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative survey of older Americans conducted by the University of Michigan for the National Institute on Aging. The survey interviewed a large sample of non-institutionalized adults ages 51 to 61 in 1992 and re-interviewed them every other year. The analysis uses data through 2002, the most recent year available.

According to a 2006 AARP survey of business executives, "when asked to name the disadvantages of this group, just over half (52%) of executives expressed the belief that this age group is "uncomfortable with technology," 49 percent indicated that they are "inflexible," and 44 percent felt that they...

According to a 2006 AARP survey of business executives, "when asked to name the disadvantages of this group, just over half (52%) of executives expressed the belief that this age group is "uncomfortable with technology," 49 percent indicated that they are "inflexible," and 44 percent felt that they have "difficulty reporting to younger supervisors." (p. 4)

AARP. (2006). Business executives' attitudes toward the aging workforce: Aware but not prepared?. Washington, DC: AARP Knowledge Management. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/aging_workforce.pdf

Over 1,000 business executives--including chief executive officers and other "c"-level executives, senior vice presidents, vice presidents, and general managers--completed the online survey between July 10 and July 23, 2006. All respondents were from companies with at least 100 employees worldwide, with slightly more than half (56%) from organizations with at least 1,000 employees

According to the 2005 Work-Filled Retirement survey, "more than half of workers under the age of 35 believe that workers are old by the time they reach 55, and by the time a worker reaches age 60, more than three-fourths (77%) of those under 35 would identify the worker as old...Workers 55 and older...

According to the 2005 Work-Filled Retirement survey, "more than half of workers under the age of 35 believe that workers are old by the time they reach 55, and by the time a worker reaches age 60, more than three-fourths (77%) of those under 35 would identify the worker as old...Workers 55 and older are approximately half as likely as workers under 35 to claim a 60-year-old worker should be counted as old." (p.13)

Reynolds, S., Ridley, N., & Van Horn, C. (2005). A work-filled retirement: Workers’ changing views on employment and leisure (Work Trends Survey No. 8.1). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/WT16.pdf

“In this report, American workers across the nation describe their expectations of retirement and their views of how older workers are treated in the workplace…A total of 1,232 adults were interviewed for this survey. Respondents who worked full or part time, or who were unemployed and looking for work, received a complete interview. A total of 432 respondents who did not meet these criteria received a short interview that included demographic questions. The results of this report are based on a total of 800 complete interviews with members of the workforce, including 82 people who have retired from their primary job but remain in the workforce. The final results were weighted to match U.S. Census Bureau estimates for age, educational attainment, gender, and race.”

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among "boomers", 21% reported that their supervisors are significantly older than they are, while 56% have supervisors about the same age and 23% have significantly younger supervisors. Among Gen-X and Gen-Y workers, 64% and 82%, respectively,...

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among "boomers", 21% reported that their supervisors are significantly older than they are, while 56% have supervisors about the same age and 23% have significantly younger supervisors. Among Gen-X and Gen-Y workers, 64% and 82%, respectively, have significantly older supervisors, while 71% of "Matures" have significantly younger supervisors. (table 1, p. 3)

Families and Work Institute. (2004). Older employees in the workforce: A companion brief to: Generations and gender in the workplace. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/olderworkers.pdf

This report draws upon data from Families and Work Institutes 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. Older employees are defined as members of the Mature generation (58 or more years old in 2002 when data were collected . Younger employees are members of three generationsthe Baby Boom (post World War II or 38 57 year olds), Generation X (23 37 year olds), and Generation Y (18 22 year olds) in 2002.

According to the 2003 Eldercare Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 16% of HR professionals reported their organization has seen "strained employee/manager relationships" due to eldercare issues. (Table 3, p.6)

According to the 2003 Eldercare Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 16% of HR professionals reported their organization has seen "strained employee/manager relationships" due to eldercare issues. (Table 3, p.6)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Eldercare Survey. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

“In June 2003, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted a survey on eldercare. The impact of eldercare issues on the workforce is an area of growing concern for employers and HR professionals. As more people are dealing with eldercare issues, these issues have begun to impact the workplace and are expected to increase in the years to come. The survey explored current eldercare policies and benefits, the effect of eldercare issues on workers, as well as definitions of an elder, and views of eldercare as an employer issue. The following report provides an analysis of the results. An e-mail with the survey’s Web address was sent to 2,000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,725 were successfully delivered to respondents, and 289 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%. The report analyzes the results of the survey. The results are analyzed first by overall responses and then by industry and organization size... “

According to the 2003 Eldercare Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 9% of HR professionals reported their organization has seen "resentment from other employees" due to eldercare issues. (Table 3, p.6)

According to the 2003 Eldercare Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 9% of HR professionals reported their organization has seen "resentment from other employees" due to eldercare issues. (Table 3, p.6)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Eldercare Survey. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

“In June 2003, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted a survey on eldercare. The impact of eldercare issues on the workforce is an area of growing concern for employers and HR professionals. As more people are dealing with eldercare issues, these issues have begun to impact the workplace and are expected to increase in the years to come. The survey explored current eldercare policies and benefits, the effect of eldercare issues on workers, as well as definitions of an elder, and views of eldercare as an employer issue. The following report provides an analysis of the results. An e-mail with the survey’s Web address was sent to 2,000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,725 were successfully delivered to respondents, and 289 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%. The report analyzes the results of the survey. The results are analyzed first by overall responses and then by industry and organization size... “

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