Multi-generational Workplace

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According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "the majority of workers say that they are financially recovering from the Great Recession: 14 percent have fully recovered and 44 percent have recovered somewhat. Eighteen percent have not yet begun to recover. Nine percent feel they may...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "the majority of workers say that they are financially recovering from the Great Recession: 14 percent have fully recovered and 44 percent have recovered somewhat. Eighteen percent have not yet begun to recover. Nine percent feel they may never recover. And 15 percent said they were not impacted. Millennials are most likely to have fully recovered (17 percent) or were not impacted (21 percent). Baby Boomers and Generation X share similar response rates in terms of the status of their recoveries; however, Baby Boomers are more likely to feel that they may never recover (13 percent)." (p. 22)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 - March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "retirement confidence is recovering in step with workers' financial recovery. Millennials, the generation least impacted by the recession, have the highest levels of confidence with nearly one in five (19 percent) being 'very confident'...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "retirement confidence is recovering in step with workers' financial recovery. Millennials, the generation least impacted by the recession, have the highest levels of confidence with nearly one in five (19 percent) being 'very confident' that they will be able to retire with a comfortable lifestyle. Confidence is lower among Generation X (14 percent) and Baby Boomers (13 percent)." (p. 23)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21-March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "despite higher levels of confidence, one in three (33 percent) workers expects their standard of living to decrease when the retire. This concern is higher among Baby Boomers (41 percent) and Generation X (34 percent). In contrast, 20 percent...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "despite higher levels of confidence, one in three (33 percent) workers expects their standard of living to decrease when the retire. This concern is higher among Baby Boomers (41 percent) and Generation X (34 percent). In contrast, 20 percent of Millennials expect their standard of living to decrease when they retire." (p. 24)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 - March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "the majority of workers (55 percent) plan to work past age 65 or do not plan to retire. However, expectations are quite different among generations. Sixty-five percent of Baby Boomer workers plan to continue working past age 65 or do not...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "the majority of workers (55 percent) plan to work past age 65 or do not plan to retire. However, expectations are quite different among generations. Sixty-five percent of Baby Boomer workers plan to continue working past age 65 or do not plan to retire. Many of Generation X (54 percent) also plan to do so. In contrast, the majority of Millennials (60 percent) plan to retire at 65 or sooner." (p. 31)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 – March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "a strong majority (64 percent) of workers envision a phased transition into retirement during which they will continue working, reduce hours with more leisure time to enjoy life, or work in a different capacity that is less demanding and/or...

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "a strong majority (64 percent) of workers envision a phased transition into retirement during which they will continue working, reduce hours with more leisure time to enjoy life, or work in a different capacity that is less demanding and/or brings greater personal satisfaction. Only 22 percent expect to immediately stop working when they retire. Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials share similar expectations." (p. 32)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 - March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "many workers (52 percent) plan to continue working after they retire, including 40 percent who plan to work part-time and 12 percent full-time. Only 27 percent of workers do not plan to work after they retire, and 21 percent are not sure....

According to a 2014 Transamerica retirement readiness survey, "many workers (52 percent) plan to continue working after they retire, including 40 percent who plan to work part-time and 12 percent full-time. Only 27 percent of workers do not plan to work after they retire, and 21 percent are not sure. Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials are strikingly similar in their expectations." (p. 33)

Collinson, C. (2014). The retirement readiness of three unique generations: Baby boomers, generation X, and millennials. US: Transamerican Center for Retirement Studies. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_three_unique_generations.pdf

A 22-minute, online survey was conducted between February 21 - March 17, 2014 among a nationally representative sample of 4,143 workers age 18 or older by Harris Poll for Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Respondents were full-time or part-time workers in a for-profit company employing 10 or more people. The base included 1,021 Millennials, 1,120 Generation X, 1,805 Baby Boomers, and 197 who were born prior to 1946.

According to a 2014 Gallup survey, "nearly three in 10 young American workers (29%) say they worry about being laid off, almost double the 15% of 35- to 54-year-olds and the 13% of workers aged 55 and older (13%). "

According to a 2014 Gallup survey, "nearly three in 10 young American workers (29%) say they worry about being laid off, almost double the 15% of 35- to 54-year-olds and the 13% of workers aged 55 and older (13%). "

Duggan, A. (2014). Fewer workers in the U.S. are worried about job setbacks. US: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/174980/fewer-workers-worried-job-setbacks.aspx

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted Aug. 7-10, 2014, with a random sample of 474 adults who are employed full or part time, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

According to a 2013 Gallup study, among the generations in the workplace "traditionalists, who represent 4% of the working population in 2012, have the highest level of engagement at 41%, followed by 33% for Millennials, who comprise 8% of 2012’s working population. Of those in Generation X, 28%...

According to a 2013 Gallup study, among the generations in the workplace "traditionalists, who represent 4% of the working population in 2012, have the highest level of engagement at 41%, followed by 33% for Millennials, who comprise 8% of 2012’s working population. Of those in Generation X, 28% are engaged, compared with 26% of Baby Boomers. Baby Boomers have the lowest level of engagement, and they have the highest level of active disengagement -- nearly one in four are actively disengaged." (p. 36)

Gallup. (2013). State of the american workplace: Employee engagement insights for U.S. business leaders. Washington, DC: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/strategicconsulting/163007/state-american-workplace.aspx

The data in this report came from Gallup's Q12 Client Database, Gallup Panel studies, or Gallup Daily tracking. Some findings came from Gallup's 2012 meta-analysis.

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, 69 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) and 64 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) report "finding a positive energy at work, compared to just a 53 percent average among other generational groups."

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, 69 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) and 64 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) report "finding a positive energy at work, compared to just a 53 percent average among other generational groups."

Ranstad. (2013). Talking about my generation: New study finds millennial and mature workers' attitudes align. USA: Ranstad. Retrieved from http://www.randstadusa.com/about-randstad/press-room/talking-about-my-generation-new-study-finds-millennial-and-mature-workers-attitudes-align

The Randstad Engagement Index is comprised of findings from quarterly waves of research targeting employees and annual surveys of employers. The sixth wave of findings was conducted online Nov. 1 - 13, 2012 from a national sample of 3,417 adults aged 18 and older who are currently employed full time from Ipsos' U.S. online panel. Weighting was used to balance demographics and ensure samples reflect the U.S. population of working adults.

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents...

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents and 80 percent of millennials)."

Ranstad. (2013). Talking about my generation: New study finds millennial and mature workers' attitudes align. USA: Ranstad. Retrieved from http://www.randstadusa.com/about-randstad/press-room/talking-about-my-generation-new-study-finds-millennial-and-mature-workers-attitudes-align

The Randstad Engagement Index is comprised of findings from quarterly waves of research targeting employees and annual surveys of employers. The sixth wave of findings was conducted online Nov. 1 - 13, 2012 from a national sample of 3,417 adults aged 18 and older who are currently employed full time from Ipsos' U.S. online panel. Weighting was used to balance demographics and ensure samples reflect the U.S. population of working adults.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, nearly half (46%) of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "grew up in families in which both parents worked full-time or part time. Almost two in 10 grew up in single-parent households. Another 37% had one parent working while the other parent stayed...

According to a 2013 MetLife study, nearly half (46%) of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "grew up in families in which both parents worked full-time or part time. Almost two in 10 grew up in single-parent households. Another 37% had one parent working while the other parent stayed home." (p.15)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, more than half (55%) of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "are not working in the career they had intended when they entered the workforce, yet most (87%) are somewhat or very satisfied with their career advancement. A little more than one in 10 are...

According to a 2013 MetLife study, more than half (55%) of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "are not working in the career they had intended when they entered the workforce, yet most (87%) are somewhat or very satisfied with their career advancement. A little more than one in 10 are not satisfied with the advancement they've made in their careers." (p.8)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, 63% of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "still have both parents living, 29% have only one parent, and only 9% have no parents living. Almost two in 10 provide regular care for older parents or other relatives, with an average of almost 11 hours of...

According to a 2013 MetLife study, 63% of Generation X members (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "still have both parents living, 29% have only one parent, and only 9% have no parents living. Almost two in 10 provide regular care for older parents or other relatives, with an average of almost 11 hours of care per week." (p.6)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "believes nearly half their retirement income will come from pensions, 401(k)s and other retirement plans, with only one-third from Social Security and 21% from savings and investments." (p.5)

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "believes nearly half their retirement income will come from pensions, 401(k)s and other retirement plans, with only one-third from Social Security and 21% from savings and investments." (p.5)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "wants to retire by about age 62, but they doubt they will be able to retire until they are 67." (p.5)

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "wants to retire by about age 62, but they doubt they will be able to retire until they are 67." (p.5)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, 36% of the nation's young adults ages 18-31--the so-called Millenial generation--were living in their parents' home." (p. 1)

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, 36% of the nation's young adults ages 18-31--the so-called Millenial generation--were living in their parents' home." (p. 1)

Fry, R. (2013). A rising share of young adults live in their parents' home. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from ;http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2013/07/SDT-millennials-living-with-parents-07-2013.pdf

This report is based on analysis of the March 2012 Current Population Survey.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, among employed older adults, since turning 50, 60% of those surveyed say "they have had colleagues come to them for advice more often and 42% say they have felt as though they were receiving more respect within...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, among employed older adults, since turning 50, 60% of those surveyed say "they have had colleagues come to them for advice more often and 42% say they have felt as though they were receiving more respect within the company." (p.5)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 48% of workers age 50 and older say their current boss is younger than they are, 18% say their current boss is older, and 27% say their current boss is about the same age. "Nearly two-thirds (63%) say most of...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 48% of workers age 50 and older say their current boss is younger than they are, 18% say their current boss is older, and 27% say their current boss is about the same age. "Nearly two-thirds (63%) say most of their co-workers are younger than they are, 4% say most of their co-workers are older, and 22% say their co-workers are about the same age. Seventy-six percent of workers age 50 and older who say their current boss is younger than they are also say that most of their co-workers are younger as well." (p.4)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "the view that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today's economy is held by 41% of respondents... A smaller share--29%--say middle-aged adults are having the toughest time, while just 24% say older adults are having the worst of it." (p. 4)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "the view that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today's economy is held by 41% of respondents... A smaller share--29%--say middle-aged adults are having the toughest time, while just 24% say older adults are having the worst of it." (p. 4)

PewResearch Center. (2012). Young, underemployed and optimistic coming of age, slowly, in a tough economy social & demographic trends. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/02/SDT-Youth-and-Economy.pdf

This report is based on findings from a Pew Research Center survey conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, among 2,048 adults nationwide, including 808 young adults (ages 18 to 34). The report also draws on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "more than eight-in-ten (82%) say finding a job is harder for young adults today than it was for their parents' generation. And at least seven-in-ten say it's harder now to save for the future (75%), pay for college (71%) or buy a home (69%)." (p. 1)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "more than eight-in-ten (82%) say finding a job is harder for young adults today than it was for their parents' generation. And at least seven-in-ten say it's harder now to save for the future (75%), pay for college (71%) or buy a home (69%)." (p. 1)

PewResearch Center. (2012). Young, underemployed and optimistic coming of age, slowly, in a tough economy social & demographic trends. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/02/SDT-Youth-and-Economy.pdf

This report is based on findings from a Pew Research Center survey conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, among 2,048 adults nationwide, including 808 young adults (ages 18 to 34). The report also draws on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "among all 18- to 34-year-olds, fully half (49%) say they have taken a job they didn't want just to pay the bills, with 24% saying they have taken an unpaid job to gain work experience. And more than one-third (35%) say that, as a result of the poor economy, they have...

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "among all 18- to 34-year-olds, fully half (49%) say they have taken a job they didn't want just to pay the bills, with 24% saying they have taken an unpaid job to gain work experience. And more than one-third (35%) say that, as a result of the poor economy, they have gone back to school. Their personal lives have also been affected: 31% have postponed either getting married or having a baby (22% say they have postponed having a baby and 20% have put off getting married). One-in-four (24%) say they have moved back in with their parents after living on their own. (p. 1)

PewResearch Center. (2012). Young, underemployed and optimistic coming of age, slowly, in a tough economy social & demographic trends. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/02/SDT-Youth-and-Economy.pdf

This report is based on findings from a Pew Research Center survey conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, among 2,048 adults nationwide, including 808 young adults (ages 18 to 34). The report also draws on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "among 18- to 34-year-olds who are not employed, nearly half (48%) have lived with their parents. This compares with only 30% of those who are employed full time." (p. 4)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "among 18- to 34-year-olds who are not employed, nearly half (48%) have lived with their parents. This compares with only 30% of those who are employed full time." (p. 4)

Parker, K. (2012). The boomerang generation: Feeling OK about living with mom and dad. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/03/PewSocialTrends-2012-BoomerangGeneration.pdf

These findings are based on a new Pew Research Center survey of 2,048 adults nationwide conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, that explores the family dynamics and economics of multi-generational living at a time when the number of multi-generational family households in the country continues to rise.

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "three-in-ten parents of adult children (29%) report that a child of theirs has moved back in with them in the past few years because of the economy." (p. 1-2)

According to a 2012 Pew survey, "three-in-ten parents of adult children (29%) report that a child of theirs has moved back in with them in the past few years because of the economy." (p. 1-2)

Parker, K. (2012). The boomerang generation: Feeling OK about living with mom and dad. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/03/PewSocialTrends-2012-BoomerangGeneration.pdf

These findings are based on a new Pew Research Center survey of 2,048 adults nationwide conducted Dec. 6-19, 2011, that explores the family dynamics and economics of multi-generational living at a time when the number of multi-generational family households in the country continues to rise.

According to a 2012 Heldrich Center report, Millennials who had graduated from college and were employed full-time "are less satisfied with their jobs than either GenXers or Baby Boomers. Just 31 percent say they are 'very satisfied' with their job, compared to 39 percent of Xers and 44 percent of Boomers....

According to a 2012 Heldrich Center report, Millennials who had graduated from college and were employed full-time "are less satisfied with their jobs than either GenXers or Baby Boomers. Just 31 percent say they are 'very satisfied' with their job, compared to 39 percent of Xers and 44 percent of Boomers. And, while only about 15 percent of the older generations say they are dissatisfied with their job, one-quarter of Millennials are unhappy with their work life." (p. 15)

Zukin, C., & Szeltner, M. (2012). Net impacts's talent report: What workers want in 2012. Brunswick, NJ: Heldrich Center, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/content/Net_Impact_Talent_Report.pdf

The survey was conducted by Knowledge Networks, with an on-line probability sample between February 15 and 28, 2012. The sample included 807 Millennial Workers who graduated from a four-year college and who are currently employed full time; 230 GenerationX Workers who graduated from a four-year college and are currently employed full time; and 258 Baby Boomer Workers who graduated from a four-year college and who are currently employed full time.

According to a 2012 Heldrich Center report, among who had graduated from college and were employed full-time, GenXers and Baby Boomers get more satisfaction from leisure than work by a margin of about 60 percent to 40 percent. Among Millennials in the workforce, however, leisure trumps work by a much...

According to a 2012 Heldrich Center report, among who had graduated from college and were employed full-time, GenXers and Baby Boomers get more satisfaction from leisure than work by a margin of about 60 percent to 40 percent. Among Millennials in the workforce, however, leisure trumps work by a much larger margin of 68 percent to 31 percent. (p. 5)

Zukin, C., & Szeltner, M. (2012). Net impacts's talent report: What workers want in 2012. Brunswick, NJ: Heldrich Center, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/content/Net_Impact_Talent_Report.pdf

The survey was conducted by Knowledge Networks, with an on-line probability sample between February 15 and 28, 2012. The sample included 807 Millennial Workers who graduated from a four-year college and who are currently employed full time; 230 GenerationX Workers who graduated from a four-year college and are currently employed full time; and 258 Baby Boomer Workers who graduated from a four-year college and who are currently employed full time.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial is their resistance to taking direction from older management."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other hand, need to improve their writing skills (46 percent), while far fewer mature workers need to do so (9 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while they say Millennial workers are creative (74 percent) and strong networkers (73 percent)."

Adecco Staffing Mature Worker Survey – Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers are three times as likely to hire a mature worker (60 percent) as they are to hire a Millennial (20 percent)."

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers are three times as likely to hire a mature worker (60 percent) as they are to hire a Millennial (20 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 analysis from the Heldrich Center, among a representative sample of recent college graduates, "only about half (48%) thought they will have more financial success than their parents. About a third (29%) thought they will do as well as their parents and one-fifth (20%) thought they...

According to a 2012 analysis from the Heldrich Center, among a representative sample of recent college graduates, "only about half (48%) thought they will have more financial success than their parents. About a third (29%) thought they will do as well as their parents and one-fifth (20%) thought they will not do as well financially as their parents did."

Stone, C., Van Horn, Z., & Zukin, C. (2012). Chasing the American dream: Recent college graduates and the great recession. New Brunswick, NJ: Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/content/Chasing_American_Dream_Report.pdf

This report describes the findings of a study on nationally representative sample of 444 recent college graduates from the class of 2006 through 2011.

According to a 2012 analysis from the Heldrich Center ,"most recent college graduates are also far from financially independent of their parents or other family members. Family members are helping their young graduates with basic necessities, such as food (22%), health care (15%), housing (30%), and...

According to a 2012 analysis from the Heldrich Center ,"most recent college graduates are also far from financially independent of their parents or other family members. Family members are helping their young graduates with basic necessities, such as food (22%), health care (15%), housing (30%), and car payments (9%). Overall, 51% of the respondents to our survey get financial support from their parents or relatives. (p. 14)

Stone, C., Van Horn, Z., & Zukin, C. (2012). Chasing the American dream: Recent college graduates and the great recession. New Brunswick, NJ: Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/sites/default/files/content/Chasing_American_Dream_Report.pdf

This report describes the findings of a study on nationally representative sample of 444 recent college graduates from the class of 2006 through 2011.

According to a 2012 Metlife report, "59% of employers are considering generational differences and needs in their strategic thinking about benefits." That is, they agree with the statement "Our company strives to understand and meet our employees' different generational needs when it comes to benefits...

According to a 2012 Metlife report, "59% of employers are considering generational differences and needs in their strategic thinking about benefits." That is, they agree with the statement "Our company strives to understand and meet our employees' different generational needs when it comes to benefits products, programs, and services." (fig. 4.15, p. 71)

Metlife. (2012). 10th Annual study of employee benefits trends: Seeing opportunity in shifting tides. New York: Metlife. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/institutional/services/insights-and-tools/ebts/ml-10-Annual-EBTS.pdf

The 10th Annual MetLife Study of Employee Benefits Trends was conducted during September and October of 2011 and consisted of two distinct studies fielded by GfK Custom Research North America. The employer survey comprised 1,519 interviews with benefits decision-makers at companies with staff sizes of at least two employees. The employee sample comprised 1,412 interviews with full-time employees age 21 and over, at companies with a minimum of two employees.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "among the top 20 components of job satisfaction, only two showed significant differences based on age." Career advancement ranked 12th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 33% of Baby Boomers, compared to 50% of Millennials...

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "among the top 20 components of job satisfaction, only two showed significant differences based on age." Career advancement ranked 12th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 33% of Baby Boomers, compared to 50% of Millennials and 51% of Generation X . An organizations' financial stability was ranked 7th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 56% of Baby Boomers, 55% of Generation X, and 39% of Millenials. (Table 9, p 60)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to a 2011 analysis of SIPP data by the Urban Institute, "median hourly wages for reemployed men are 20.1 percent lower on the new job than the old job for men age 50 to 61 and 35.6 percent lower on the new job for men age 62 or older. Younger displaced men fare much better when they find new...

According to a 2011 analysis of SIPP data by the Urban Institute, "median hourly wages for reemployed men are 20.1 percent lower on the new job than the old job for men age 50 to 61 and 35.6 percent lower on the new job for men age 62 or older. Younger displaced men fare much better when they find new employment. Compared to what they earned on the former job, median hourly earnings are only 4.2 percent lower for men age 35 to 49 and 1.5 percent lower for men age 25 to 34. (table 10 and p. 22)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "the patterns are similar 12 months after job loss: 87 percent of displaced workers age 35 to 49 and 92 percent of those age 18 to 24 become reemployed, compared with only 79 percent of displaced workers age 50 to 61 and 63 percent of those age...

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "the patterns are similar 12 months after job loss: 87 percent of displaced workers age 35 to 49 and 92 percent of those age 18 to 24 become reemployed, compared with only 79 percent of displaced workers age 50 to 61 and 63 percent of those age 62 or older." (p. 18-19)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "within six months of job loss, 76 percent of displaced workers age 18 to 24, 70 percent of those age 25 to 34, and 69 percent of those age 35 to 49 become reemployed. By contrast, only 58 percent of displaced workers age 50 to 61 and 48 percent...

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "within six months of job loss, 76 percent of displaced workers age 18 to 24, 70 percent of those age 25 to 34, and 69 percent of those age 35 to 49 become reemployed. By contrast, only 58 percent of displaced workers age 50 to 61 and 48 percent of those age 62 or older find new jobs over the same period." (p. 18)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "the most substantial difference between older and younger workers is average job tenure. At baseline, mean job tenure is 133.6 months (or 11.1 years) for workers age 50 to 61 and 128.5 months (10.7 years) for workers age 62 or older, compared with...

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "the most substantial difference between older and younger workers is average job tenure. At baseline, mean job tenure is 133.6 months (or 11.1 years) for workers age 50 to 61 and 128.5 months (10.7 years) for workers age 62 or older, compared with 37.1 months (3.1 years) for workers age 25 to 34 and 85.5 months (7.1 years) for workers age 35 to 49." (p. 15)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "for displaced men who become reemployed, the median hourly wage on the new job falls 20 percent below the median wage on the old job at age 50 to 61. For those reemployed at age 62 or older, the new median wage falls 36 percent below the old median...

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "for displaced men who become reemployed, the median hourly wage on the new job falls 20 percent below the median wage on the old job at age 50 to 61. For those reemployed at age 62 or older, the new median wage falls 36 percent below the old median wage.  By contrast, men‘s median wages fall only 4 percent at age 35 to 49 and 2 percent at age 25 to 34." (p. vii)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "displaced men age 50 to 61 are 39 percent less likely to become reemployed each month than otherwise identical men age 25 to 34, and men age 62 or older are 51 percent less likely. Displaced women are 18 percent less likely to find a new job at...

According to a 2011 analysis from the Urban Institute, "displaced men age 50 to 61 are 39 percent less likely to become reemployed each month than otherwise identical men age 25 to 34, and men age 62 or older are 51 percent less likely. Displaced women are 18 percent less likely to find a new job at age 50 to 61 than at age 25 to 34 (when personal and job characteristics are held constant), and 50 percent less likely at age 62 or older." (p. vii)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2011). Age differences in job loss, job search, and reemployment. (Program on Retirement Policy Discussion Paper No. 11-01). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412284-Age-Differences.pdf

Data come primarily from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and from the March, April, May, and June 2010 Current Population Surveys.

According to a 2011 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "in the year ending in September 2010, 35- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (32.2 percent of the population). Persons aged 16 to 24 were the least likely to volunteer (18.4 percent)." For adults aged 45-54 and 55-64, the...

According to a 2011 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "in the year ending in September 2010, 35- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (32.2 percent of the population). Persons aged 16 to 24 were the least likely to volunteer (18.4 percent)." For adults aged 45-54 and 55-64, the rates were 30.3% and 27.2%, respectively, while 23.6% of those 65 years and older volunteered during the same period.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Volunteering in 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved January 31, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110128.htm

These data were collected through a supplement to the September 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS).

According to a 2011 report on the state government workforce, "in 2006, 9% of managers [in state government agencies] were older than 60, 26% were older than 55, and 47% were older than 50 years. In 1980, those percentages were only 7, 16, and 28, respectively." (p. 56)

According to a 2011 report on the state government workforce, "in 2006, 9% of managers [in state government agencies] were older than 60, 26% were older than 55, and 47% were older than 50 years. In 1980, those percentages were only 7, 16, and 28, respectively." (p. 56)

Lewis, G. B., & Cho, Y. J. (2011). The aging of the state government workforce: Trends and implications. American Review of Public Administration, 41(1), 48-60.

This study is based on analysis for data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Samples. and the 2001-2007 American Community Surveys

According to a 2011 report on the state government workforce, "in 1980, states had nearly as many employees younger than 30 years as older than 50; by 2006, the employees older than 50 outnumbered those younger than 30 years by nearly 4 to 1." (p. 51)

According to a 2011 report on the state government workforce, "in 1980, states had nearly as many employees younger than 30 years as older than 50; by 2006, the employees older than 50 outnumbered those younger than 30 years by nearly 4 to 1." (p. 51)

Lewis, G. B., & Cho, Y. J. (2011). The aging of the state government workforce: Trends and implications. American Review of Public Administration, 41(1), 48-60.

This study is based on analysis for data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Samples. and the 2001-2007 American Community Surveys

According to a 2011 global survey of business executives, "nearly one in three (31%) firms expects to have a significantly higher proportion of older workers (65+) within the next five years." (p. 3)

According to a 2011 global survey of business executives, "nearly one in three (31%) firms expects to have a significantly higher proportion of older workers (65+) within the next five years." (p. 3)

Economist Intelligence Unit. (2011). A silver opportunity? Rising longevity and its implications for business. Geneva: Economist Intelligence Unit Limited. Retrieved from http://viewswire.eiu.com/report_dl.asp?mode=fi&fi=1877919572.PDF

The Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a global survey of 583 executives during January and February 2011. Of the respondents, 36% were based in Europe, 33% in the Asia- Pacific region and 18% in North America, with 13% from the rest of the world. It covers a wide range of sectors, including financial services, telecommunications and technology, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology and professional services. All company sizes were represented.

According to a 2011 global survey of business executives, "71% see increased longevity as an opportunity, compared with 43% who consider it a risk. Nearly four times as many see it as wholly an opportunity (39%) than wholly a risk (11%), with one in three (32%) seeing it as delivering both risks and...

According to a 2011 global survey of business executives, "71% see increased longevity as an opportunity, compared with 43% who consider it a risk. Nearly four times as many see it as wholly an opportunity (39%) than wholly a risk (11%), with one in three (32%) seeing it as delivering both risks and opportunities in equal measure. Relatively few firms (13%) claim to have not considered the implications of rising longevity." (p. 2)

Economist Intelligence Unit. (2011). A silver opportunity? Rising longevity and its implications for business. Geneva: Economist Intelligence Unit Limited. Retrieved from http://viewswire.eiu.com/report_dl.asp?mode=fi&fi=1877919572.PDF

The Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a global survey of 583 executives during January and February 2011. Of the respondents, 36% were based in Europe, 33% in the Asia- Pacific region and 18% in North America, with 13% from the rest of the world. It covers a wide range of sectors, including financial services, telecommunications and technology, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology and professional services. All company sizes were represented.

According to a 2011 global survey of working adults, two fifths (39 per cent) of younger workers [aged 18-29] are frequently or nearly always concerned about their work-life balance, compared to one in four workers aged 60+ (24 per cent).  A third (31 per cent) of the younger workers are also concerned...

According to a 2011 global survey of working adults, two fifths (39 per cent) of younger workers [aged 18-29] are frequently or nearly always concerned about their work-life balance, compared to one in four workers aged 60+ (24 per cent).  A third (31 per cent) of the younger workers are also concerned about pressure to work longer hours, compared to 17 per cent of workers in their 60s.

GfK NOP. (2011). Young workers disengaged by pressures of work worldwide. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from http://www.gfknop.com/pressinfo/releases/singlearticles/007993/index.en.html

The GfK International Employee Engagement Survey was conducted by international research firm the GfK Custom Research. It includes the opinions of 30,556 working adults in 29 countries who were interviewed between February 8th and April 4th 2011 using online, telephone or in-person interviewing techniques appropriate to the country.

According to a 2011 global survey of working adults, "just 21 per cent of 18-29-year-olds are highly engaged with their employer, compared to 31 per cent of those in their 60s."

According to a 2011 global survey of working adults, "just 21 per cent of 18-29-year-olds are highly engaged with their employer, compared to 31 per cent of those in their 60s."

GfK NOP. (2011). Young workers disengaged by pressures of work worldwide. Retrieved May 24, 2011, from http://www.gfknop.com/pressinfo/releases/singlearticles/007993/index.en.html

The GfK International Employee Engagement Survey was conducted by international research firm the GfK Custom Research. It includes the opinions of 30,556 working adults in 29 countries who were interviewed between February 8th and April 4th 2011 using online, telephone or in-person interviewing techniques appropriate to the country.

According to a 2011 survey by CareerBuilder, "27 percent of workers reported they have felt bullied in the workplace...Looking at age, 29 percent of workers age 55 or older and 29 percent of workers age 24 or younger reported they had been bullied on the job, the highest among age groups. Workers age...

According to a 2011 survey by CareerBuilder, "27 percent of workers reported they have felt bullied in the workplace...Looking at age, 29 percent of workers age 55 or older and 29 percent of workers age 24 or younger reported they had been bullied on the job, the highest among age groups. Workers age 35 to 44 were the least likely to report feeling bullied at 25 percent. "

Careerbuilder. (2011). One-in-four workers have felt bullied in the workplace, CareerBuilder study finds. Retrieved June 16, 2011, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr632&sd=4/20/2011&ed=4/20/2099&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr632_

The study was conducted from February 21 to March 10, 2011 and included more than 5,600 full-time workers nationwide.

According to a 2011 report from Mercer, "32% of US workers are seriously considering leaving their organization at the present time, up from 23% in 2005." Among younger workers: 40% of employees age 25-34 are seriously considering leaving, along with 44% of employees age 24 and younger. (p. 2)

According to a 2011 report from Mercer, "32% of US workers are seriously considering leaving their organization at the present time, up from 23% in 2005." Among younger workers: 40% of employees age 25-34 are seriously considering leaving, along with 44% of employees age 24 and younger. (p. 2)

Mercer. (2011). Inside employees' minds: Navigating the new rules of engagement. US survey summary - June 2011. New York: Mercer.

ManpowerGroup surveyed nearly 40,000 employers across 39 countries and territories during the first quarter of 2011 . The 39,641 interviews were conducted via telephone in 39 countries and territories, including more than 1,300 U.S. employers.

According to a 2011 survey of over 2000 workers in the United Kingdom, "fewer than half of workers (46%) aged 65 and above report they have a formal performance appraisal either once a year or more frequently, compared with 65% of all employees. In all, 44% of employees aged 65 and above have not had...

According to a 2011 survey of over 2000 workers in the United Kingdom, "fewer than half of workers (46%) aged 65 and above report they have a formal performance appraisal either once a year or more frequently, compared with 65% of all employees. In all, 44% of employees aged 65 and above have not had a formal performance appraisal in the last two years or never, compared with a survey average of 27%." (p. 4)

CIPD. (2011). Employee outlook: Focus on managing an ageing workforce. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Retrieved from http://www.cipd.co.uk/binaries/Employee%20Outlook%20Focus%20on%20age.pdf

This latest quarterly online survey was conducted by YouGov for the CIPD of 2,004 UK employees from 25 March–6 April 2011. This survey was administered to a panel of more than 285,000 individuals who have agreed to take part in surveys. The sample was selected and weighted to be representative of the UK workforce in relation to sector and size (private, public, voluntary), industry type and full-time/part-time working by gender.

According to a 2010 Metlife report, "employees with eldercare responsibilities were more likely to report missed days of work. This was driven by the much higher absenteeism among younger caregiving employees, ages 18 to 39. Overall, 9% of non-caregivers missed at least one day of work over the past...

According to a 2010 Metlife report, "employees with eldercare responsibilities were more likely to report missed days of work. This was driven by the much higher absenteeism among younger caregiving employees, ages 18 to 39. Overall, 9% of non-caregivers missed at least one day of work over the past two weeks because of health issues compared to 10% of caregivers." (p. 5)

MetLife. (2010). MetLife study of working caregivers and employer health care costs: New insights and innovations for reducing health care costs for employers. New York, NY: MetLife. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2010/mmi-working-caregivers-employers-health-care-costs.pdf

This report is based on a case-study analysis of anonymous aggregate responses from 17,097 U.S. employees of a major multi-national manufacturing corporation who completed health risk assessment (HRA) questionnaires. Nearly 12% of these employees reported caregiving for an older person.

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "minimum wage workers tend to be young. Although workers under age 25 represented only about one-fifth of hourly-paid workers, they made up about half of those paid the Federal minimum wage or less. Among employed teenagers paid by the...

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "minimum wage workers tend to be young. Although workers under age 25 represented only about one-fifth of hourly-paid workers, they made up about half of those paid the Federal minimum wage or less. Among employed teenagers paid by the hour, nearly 19 percent earned the minimum wage or less, compared with about 3 percent of workers age 25 and over."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Characteristics of minimum wage workers: 2009. Retrieved March 9, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/cps/minwage2009.htm

These data on minimum wage earners are derived from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly nationwide survey of households. Data in this summary are 2009 annual averages.

According to a 2010 Census Bureau report, among workforce participants who indicated that they were home based workers [that is, that they "usually" work at home] in 2005, "about 4 percent were age 15-24; nearly 18 percent were 25-34; 26 percent were 35-44; 26 percent were 45-54; 18 percent were 55-64...

According to a 2010 Census Bureau report, among workforce participants who indicated that they were home based workers [that is, that they "usually" work at home] in 2005, "about 4 percent were age 15-24; nearly 18 percent were 25-34; 26 percent were 35-44; 26 percent were 45-54; 18 percent were 55-64 and nearly 9 percent were 65 and older."

U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Census bureau reports home-based workers number 11 million in 2005. Retrieved February 3, 2010, from http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/employment_occupations/014553.html

These figures come from Home-Based Workers in the United States: 1999-2005, a series of tables that describe the type of employment, occupations and characteristics of home-based workers in the United States. The tables examine the total workforce and compare those who usually work at home with those who do not. "Usually" is defined to mean the most number of days during the week.

According to a 2010 AARP report, "in December 2007, only 3.2 percent of the aged 65-plus workforce was unemployed. December 2009 found 7.2 percent unemployed, up markedly from 5.9 percent in November 2009." (p. 5)

According to a 2010 AARP report, "in December 2007, only 3.2 percent of the aged 65-plus workforce was unemployed. December 2009 found 7.2 percent unemployed, up markedly from 5.9 percent in November 2009." (p. 5)

Rix, S. E. (2010). The employment situation, December 2009: Overall unemployment rate holds steady but ticks up slightly for older workers (Fact Sheet No. 165). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs165-employment.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--December 2009; tables in BLS's Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and January 2010; and BLS's Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/outside.jsp?survey=ln

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "by age, 35- to 44-year olds and 45- to 54-year olds were the most likely to volunteer. Their volunteer rates were 31.5 percent and 30.8 percent, respectively, in 2009. Volunteer rates were lowest among persons in their early twenties (18.8...

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "by age, 35- to 44-year olds and 45- to 54-year olds were the most likely to volunteer. Their volunteer rates were 31.5 percent and 30.8 percent, respectively, in 2009. Volunteer rates were lowest among persons in their early twenties (18.8 percent) and those age 65 and over (23.9 percent)." (Table 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Volunteering in the United States, 2009. Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "about two-thirds of all employed Millennials say it is very likely (39%) or somewhat likely (27%) they will switch careers sometime in their working life, compared with 55% of Gen Xers and 31% of Baby Boomers." (p. 46)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "about two-thirds of all employed Millennials say it is very likely (39%) or somewhat likely (27%) they will switch careers sometime in their working life, compared with 55% of Gen Xers and 31% of Baby Boomers." (p. 46)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center report, the share of 18-to-29-year-olds employed full time declined 9 percentage points from 2006 to 2010. In comparison, full-time employees make up about the same proportion of 30-to-45-year-olds (63% in 2006 and 65% in the latest survey) and 46-to-64-year-olds...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center report, the share of 18-to-29-year-olds employed full time declined 9 percentage points from 2006 to 2010. In comparison, full-time employees make up about the same proportion of 30-to-45-year-olds (63% in 2006 and 65% in the latest survey) and 46-to-64-year-olds (53% in 2006 and 54% today). (p. 45)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "millennials are significantly less likely to be working full time (41%) than Gen Xers (65%) or Boomers (54%), At the same time, these youngest members of the labor force are about twice as likely to work part time (24%) as are members of the Gen X (10%)...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "millennials are significantly less likely to be working full time (41%) than Gen Xers (65%) or Boomers (54%), At the same time, these youngest members of the labor force are about twice as likely to work part time (24%) as are members of the Gen X (10%) or Baby Boom (13%) generations." (p. 45)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten younger workers (57%) say it is not very likely or not likely at all that they will stay with their current employers for the remainder of their working life." (p. 46) Among Gen X workers, those numbers are virtually reversed: A 62%...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten younger workers (57%) say it is not very likely or not likely at all that they will stay with their current employers for the remainder of their working life." (p. 46) Among Gen X workers, those numbers are virtually reversed: A 62% majority say its likely they will never leave their current employer, while only 36% expect to someday be working for someone else. Baby Boomers, many of whom are at or approaching retirement age, are even more settled: 84% expect to remain with their current employer for the rest of their working life. (p. 47)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten (57%) Millennials say that they had volunteered in the past 12 months, which is no higher than the proportion of Gen Xers (54%) who said they had done this. About half of Baby Boomers (52%) and just 39% of those in the Silent generation...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten (57%) Millennials say that they had volunteered in the past 12 months, which is no higher than the proportion of Gen Xers (54%) who said they had done this. About half of Baby Boomers (52%) and just 39% of those in the Silent generation say they volunteered in the past year. (p. 83)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

A 2010 analysis of BLS data shows that "the labor force participation rate for workers age 16-24 has decreased from 59.1% to 54.7% in the 25 months since the recession started, representing a loss of 1.3 million young workers, while the labor force participation rate of workers age 55 and older increased...

A 2010 analysis of BLS data shows that "the labor force participation rate for workers age 16-24 has decreased from 59.1% to 54.7% in the 25 months since the recession started, representing a loss of 1.3 million young workers, while the labor force participation rate of workers age 55 and older increased from 38.9% to 39.9%, representing an increase of 2.3 million workers."

Edwards, K., & Shierholz, H. (2010). Leaving in droves (Economic Snapshot No. 02-24). Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.epi.org/economic_snapshots/entry/leaving_in_droves/

This report is based on analysis of labor force participation from the Bureau of Labor Statistics from December 2007-December 2009.

A 2010 analysis of BLS data by the Economic Policy Institute shows that as of December 2009, the unemployment rate among workers age 16 to 24 is "18.9%, compared to 6.8% for workers age 55 and older."

A 2010 analysis of BLS data by the Economic Policy Institute shows that as of December 2009, the unemployment rate among workers age 16 to 24 is "18.9%, compared to 6.8% for workers age 55 and older."

Edwards, K., & Shierholz, H. (2010). Leaving in droves (Economic Snapshot No. 02-24). Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.epi.org/economic_snapshots/entry/leaving_in_droves/

This report is based on analysis of labor force participation from the Bureau of Labor Statistics from December 2007-December 2009.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten respondents cited work ethic as one of the big sources of differences between young and old. Asked who has the better work ethic, about three-fourths of respondents said that older people do." (p. 6)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten respondents cited work ethic as one of the big sources of differences between young and old. Asked who has the better work ethic, about three-fourths of respondents said that older people do." (p. 6)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "only about six-in-ten Millennials (61%) are non-Hispanic whites. This is similar to the share among Generation X (62%), but less than that of Baby Boomers (73%) or the Silent generation (80%). The flip side of this measure is that racial and ethnic minorities...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "only about six-in-ten Millennials (61%) are non-Hispanic whites. This is similar to the share among Generation X (62%), but less than that of Baby Boomers (73%) or the Silent generation (80%). The flip side of this measure is that racial and ethnic minorities make up 39% of Millennials and 38% of Gen Xers, compared with just 27% of Baby Boomers and 20% of the Silent generation...In the Baby Boom generation, the black (11%) and Hispanic (10%) shares of the population are similar; among Millennials, there are more Hispanics (19%) than blacks (13%)." (p. 10)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "more than half of Millennials have at least some college education (54%), compared with 49% of Gen Xers, 36% of Boomers and 24% of the Silent generation when they were ages 18 to 28." (p. 10)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "more than half of Millennials have at least some college education (54%), compared with 49% of Gen Xers, 36% of Boomers and 24% of the Silent generation when they were ages 18 to 28." (p. 10)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center report, "the share of 18-to-29-year-olds employed full time declined 9 percentage points from 2006 to 2010. In comparison, full-time employees make up about the same proportion of 30-to-45-year-olds (63% in 2006 and 65% in the latest survey) and 46-to-64-year-olds...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center report, "the share of 18-to-29-year-olds employed full time declined 9 percentage points from 2006 to 2010. In comparison, full-time employees make up about the same proportion of 30-to-45-year-olds (63% in 2006 and 65% in the latest survey) and 46-to-64-year-olds (53% in 2006 and 54% today)." (p. 45)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the union membership rate was highest among workers 55 to 64 years old (16.6 percent). The lowest union membership rate occurred among those ages 16 to 24 (4.7 percent)." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "the union membership rate was highest among workers 55 to 64 years old (16.6 percent). The lowest union membership rate occurred among those ages 16 to 24 (4.7 percent)." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Union membership - 2009. Retrieved February 8, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/union2_01222010.htm

The data on union membership were collected as part of the 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS).

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over, "16 percent of workers ages 25-34 said they find it difficult to take direction from a boss younger than them, while 13 percent of workers ages 35-44 said the same. Only 7 percent of workers ages 45-54 and 5 percent of workers ages...

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over, "16 percent of workers ages 25-34 said they find it difficult to take direction from a boss younger than them, while 13 percent of workers ages 35-44 said the same. Only 7 percent of workers ages 45-54 and 5 percent of workers ages 55 and up indicated they had difficulty taking direction from a younger boss.

Careerbuilder. (2010). More than four-in-ten workers over the age of 35 currently work for a younger boss, finds new CareerBuilder survey. Retrieved February 18, 2010, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr554&sd=2/17/2010&ed=12/31/2010&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr554_

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder.com among 5,231 employees (employed full-time; not self-employed; non-government) ages 18 and over between November 5 and November 23, 2010

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over,"43 percent of workers ages 35 and older said they currently work for someone younger than them. Breaking down age groups, more than half (53 percent) of workers ages 45 and up said they have a boss younger than them, followed by 69...

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 18 and over,"43 percent of workers ages 35 and older said they currently work for someone younger than them. Breaking down age groups, more than half (53 percent) of workers ages 45 and up said they have a boss younger than them, followed by 69 percent of workers ages 55 and up."

Careerbuilder. (2010). More than four-in-ten workers over the age of 35 currently work for a younger boss, finds new CareerBuilder survey. Retrieved February 18, 2010, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr554&sd=2/17/2010&ed=12/31/2010&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr554_

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder.com among 5,231 employees (employed full-time; not self-employed; non-government) ages 18 and over between November 5 and November 23, 2009

According to a 2010 BLS report, "nearly half (49.1 percent) of older jobseekers had been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer in February 2010, compared with 28.5 percent of workers aged 16 to 24 years and 41.3 percent of workers aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 BLS report, "nearly half (49.1 percent) of older jobseekers had been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer in February 2010, compared with 28.5 percent of workers aged 16 to 24 years and 41.3 percent of workers aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

Sok, E. (2010). Record unemployment among older workers does not keep them out of the job market (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-04). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/pdf/opbils81.pdf

All of these data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of some 60,000 households that is the source of the national unemployment rate and many other labor market indicators.

According to a 2010 BLS report, "in February 2010, workers aged 55 years and older had an average duration of joblessness of 35.5 weeks (not seasonally adjusted), compared with 23.3 weeks for those aged 16 to 24 years and 30.3 weeks for those aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 BLS report, "in February 2010, workers aged 55 years and older had an average duration of joblessness of 35.5 weeks (not seasonally adjusted), compared with 23.3 weeks for those aged 16 to 24 years and 30.3 weeks for those aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

Sok, E. (2010). Record unemployment among older workers does not keep them out of the job market (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-04). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/pdf/opbils81.pdf

All of these data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of some 60,000 households that is the source of the national unemployment rate and many other labor market indicators.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployed population last year included 1.5 million workers age 55 to 64 and 421,000 workers age 65 and older, more than double the number in 2007. The 2009 average monthly unemployment rate for adults age 16 and older was 9.3 percent, about double the...

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployed population last year included 1.5 million workers age 55 to 64 and 421,000 workers age 65 and older, more than double the number in 2007. The 2009 average monthly unemployment rate for adults age 16 and older was 9.3 percent, about double the 4.6 percent rate in 2007. The unemployment rate was much higher among the youngest workers, with 17.6 percent of those age 16 to 24 out of work and looking for employment in 2009." (p. 3)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployment rate at age 35 to 44 exceeded the rate at age 55 to 61 by 18 percent (or 1.2 percentage points) and the rate at age 70 to 74 by 30 percent (or 1.8 percentage points)." (p. 4)

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployment rate at age 35 to 44 exceeded the rate at age 55 to 61 by 18 percent (or 1.2 percentage points) and the rate at age 70 to 74 by 30 percent (or 1.8 percentage points)." (p. 4)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "when the 2009 survey results are compared with those [from their comparable survey] in 1987, the largest decline in overall job satisfaction -- from 70.8 percent in 1987 to 43.4 percent now -- occurred among workers aged 65 and over....Workers under...

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "when the 2009 survey results are compared with those [from their comparable survey] in 1987, the largest decline in overall job satisfaction -- from 70.8 percent in 1987 to 43.4 percent now -- occurred among workers aged 65 and over....Workers under the age of 25 had the second greatest decline, dropping from 55.7 percent in 1987 to 35.7% in 2009." (p. 9)

Franco, L., Gibbons, J., & Barrington, L. (2010). I cant get no ... job satisfaction, that is: America's unhappy workers (Research Report No. 1459-09-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

This report is based on a 2009 survey of 5,000 U.S. households conducted for The Conference Board by TNS.

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "35.7 percent of workers under the age of 25 expressed satisfaction [with their jobs], while workers aged 25 to 34 are the most satisfied (47.2 percent)." (p. 9)

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "35.7 percent of workers under the age of 25 expressed satisfaction [with their jobs], while workers aged 25 to 34 are the most satisfied (47.2 percent)." (p. 9)

Franco, L., Gibbons, J., & Barrington, L. (2010). I cant get no ...  job satisfaction, that is: America's unhappy workers (Research Report No. 1459-09-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

This report is based on a 2009 survey of 5,000 U.S. households conducted for The Conference Board by TNS.

According to the 2010 Kelly Global Workforce Survey, "a total of 27 percent of respondents worldwide say the economic recession made them feel more loyal to their employer, while only 10 percent feel less loyal and 63 percent say it has made no difference." Among the intergenerational findings of the...

According to the 2010 Kelly Global Workforce Survey, "a total of 27 percent of respondents worldwide say the economic recession made them feel more loyal to their employer, while only 10 percent feel less loyal and 63 percent say it has made no difference." Among the intergenerational findings of the survey, "28 percent of Gen Y say that as a result of the recession, they are now more loyal to their employers, compared with 27 percent of baby boomers and 26 percent of Gen X." (p. 1)

Kelly Services. (2010). Employee loyalty rises during global economic recession, Kelly international workforce survey finds. Troy, MI: Kelly Services. Retrieved from http://www.easyir.com/easyir/kellyservices/CompanyLoyaltyGlobal_final_charts.pdf

The findings are part of the Kelly Global Workforce Index, which obtained the views of approximately 134,000 people in 29 countries across North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific. The survey, conducted from early October 2009 to the end of January 2010.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among unemployed people between the ages of 20 and 24, only 18 percent had been out of work for a year or longer in December 2009. The percentage steadily increases with age: more than 29 percent of unemployed people older than 55 had been out of work for a...

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among unemployed people between the ages of 20 and 24, only 18 percent had been out of work for a year or longer in December 2009. The percentage steadily increases with age: more than 29 percent of unemployed people older than 55 had been out of work for a year or more -- a higher rate than any younger age group." (p. 4)

Pew Economic Policy Group. (2010). A year or more: The high cost of long-term unemployment. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/uploadedFiles/wwwpewtrustsorg/Reports/Economic_Mobility/PEW-Unemployment%20Final.pdf

Pew calculations are based on data from the Current population survey in December 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "unemployed prime-age workers and older workers became substantially less inclined to drop out of the labor force between 2007 and 2009." For example, in 2009, 19.7% of workers aged 55 and older transitioned from being unemployed to not in the labor force,...

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "unemployed prime-age workers and older workers became substantially less inclined to drop out of the labor force between 2007 and 2009." For example, in 2009, 19.7% of workers aged 55 and older transitioned from being unemployed to not in the labor force, compared to 24.7% in 2007. "In contrast, the share of unemployed youths [aged 16-24] that left the labor force, which was always high, remained stable over the course of the recession, at about 30 percent."

Ilg, R. (2010). Long-term unemployment experience of the jobless (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-05, June). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/summary_10_05/long_term_unemployment.htm

This brief report compares the incidence of long-term joblessness among different age groups during the current recession, using BLS data from 2007-2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "in 2009, 18 percent of workers ages 25 to 54 were successful in their job search. Younger workers were about as likely as prime-age workers to find work in 2009. Unemployed older workers were the least likely of all to find jobs, with only about 15 percent...

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "in 2009, 18 percent of workers ages 25 to 54 were successful in their job search. Younger workers were about as likely as prime-age workers to find work in 2009. Unemployed older workers were the least likely of all to find jobs, with only about 15 percent of jobseekers finding jobs each month in 2009, compared with about 22 percent in 2007." (Table 2)

Ilg, R. (2010). Long-term unemployment experience of the jobless (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-05, June). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/summary_10_05/long_term_unemployment.htm

This brief report compares the incidence of long-term joblessness among different age groups during the current recession, using BLS data from 2007-2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "between March 2009 and March 2010, employment among those 55 to 64 grew 3.0 percent from 20,954,000 to 21,584,000. Americans 65 and over saw the number employed grow 2.3 percent from 6,055,000 to 6,192,000. Younger job seekers were not nearly as fortunate....

According to a 2010 analysis of BLS data, "between March 2009 and March 2010, employment among those 55 to 64 grew 3.0 percent from 20,954,000 to 21,584,000. Americans 65 and over saw the number employed grow 2.3 percent from 6,055,000 to 6,192,000. Younger job seekers were not nearly as fortunate. The number of 45- to 54-year-olds employed fell 1.6 percent from 33,672,000 in March 2009 to 33,137,000 [in March 2010]. Twenty- to 24-year olds saw their employment fall 3.6 percent from 12,838,000 to 12,380,000. Employment among those between the ages of 35 and 44 dropped by more than a million; from 31,654,000 to 30,623,000." (p. 3)

Chandler, Gray & Christmas, Inc. (2010). Despite high unemployment, older workers gain positions: Older workers join, succeed in job search. Retrieved June 13, 2010, from http://www.challengergray.com/press/PressRelease.aspx?PressUid=135

This report includes an analysis of 2009-2010 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

A 2010 analysis of BLS data by Bloomberg.com indicates that "the number of people aged 65 and older in the labor force -- defined as those who are working or looking for work -- has averaged 6.6 million in the first half of this year, more than the 5.9 million workers between 16 and 19, according to...

A 2010 analysis of BLS data by Bloomberg.com indicates that "the number of people aged 65 and older in the labor force -- defined as those who are working or looking for work -- has averaged 6.6 million in the first half of this year, more than the 5.9 million workers between 16 and 19, according to the Labor Department. There are now 1.13 older workers for every teen, compared with 0.5 a decade ago."

McDonough, M., & Cinko, A. (2010, July 12). Elderly workers overtake teens in job search: Chart of the day. Bloomberg Mobile. Retrieved from http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-07-12/u-s-workers-over-65-overtake-teens-for-first-time-since-48-chart-of-day.html

This analysis uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The 2010 figure is the monthly average for June.

According to a 2010 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "nearly half (49.1 percent) of older jobseekers had been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer in February 2010, compared with 28.5 percent of workers aged 16 to 24 years and 41.3 percent of workers aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "nearly half (49.1 percent) of older jobseekers had been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer in February 2010, compared with 28.5 percent of workers aged 16 to 24 years and 41.3 percent of workers aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

Sok, E. (2010). Record unemployment among older workers does not keep them out of the job market (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-04). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/summary_10_04/older_workers.htm

All of these data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of some 60,000 households that is the source of the national unemployment rate and many other labor market indicators.

According to a 2010 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in February 2010, workers aged 55 years and older had an average duration of joblessness of 35.5 weeks (not seasonally adjusted), compared with 23.3 weeks for those aged 16 to 24 years and 30.3 weeks for those aged 25 to 54 years." (p....

According to a 2010 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in February 2010, workers aged 55 years and older had an average duration of joblessness of 35.5 weeks (not seasonally adjusted), compared with 23.3 weeks for those aged 16 to 24 years and 30.3 weeks for those aged 25 to 54 years." (p. 1)

Sok, E. (2010). Record unemployment among older workers does not keep them out of the job market (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 10-04). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/summary_10_04/older_workers.htm

All of these data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of some 60,000 households that is the source of the national unemployment rate and many other labor market indicators.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Current Population Survey, "in 2009, 7.3 million workers held more than one job, and the multiple jobholding rate--the proportion of total employment made up of multiple jobholders--was 5.2 percent...For both men and women, multiple jobholding rates were...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Current Population Survey, "in 2009, 7.3 million workers held more than one job, and the multiple jobholding rate--the proportion of total employment made up of multiple jobholders--was 5.2 percent...For both men and women, multiple jobholding rates were lowest for those age 16 to 19 and age 65 and over. (p. 21, 22)

Hipple, S. (2010). Multiple jobholding during the 2000s. Monthly Labor Review, 133(7), 21-32. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2010/07/art3full.pdf

This paper is based on analysis of information on multiple jobholding which is available from the Current Population Survey (CPS).

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "close to half (48%) of older workers responded that the government should be mainly responsible for helping people when they are laid off from work, 33% said workers should help themselves, and 20% said employers should help...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "close to half (48%) of older workers responded that the government should be mainly responsible for helping people when they are laid off from work, 33% said workers should help themselves, and 20% said employers should help them. The opinions of younger workers were very similar on these questions. The biggest difference of opinion about the role of government was that 60% of older workers support tax cuts for businesses to create jobs as compared to 34% of younger workers. (fig. 10, p. 17)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 58% of older unemployed workers and 64% of younger unemployed workers reported that they were stressed from their employment situation, while 56 nearly 40% of older and 60% of younger said they were depressed, and over a quarter...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 58% of older unemployed workers and 64% of younger unemployed workers reported that they were stressed from their employment situation, while 56 nearly 40% of older and 60% of younger said they were depressed, and over a quarter of both age groups said they felt helpless, angry, or hopeless. (fig. 7, p. 15)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "coping strategies used by both older and younger job seekers to help survive their unemployment include 67% of those aged 55+ reported using money from savings to make ends meet, compared to 69% of those under age 55, while...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "coping strategies used by both older and younger job seekers to help survive their unemployment include 67% of those aged 55+ reported using money from savings to make ends meet, compared to 69% of those under age 55, while 37% of both age groups report selling possessions. While 16% of older job seekers report using Food Stamps, 31% of the younger group have done so. Six percent of the older respondents said they had lost their homes to foreclosure compared to 1% of the younger respondents. (fig. 6, p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 30% of older workers (aged 55+) indicated that they had more in credit card debt than retirement savings, and 41% had just as much in credit card debt as retirement savings. A majority of both older (59%) and younger (66%)...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 30% of older workers (aged 55+) indicated that they had more in credit card debt than retirement savings, and 41% had just as much in credit card debt as retirement savings. A majority of both older (59%) and younger (66%) workers indicated that they have financial debt aside from mortgage or rent. (p. 14)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 41% of workers over age 55 (employed and unemployed) indicated that they have no health care benefits. Medicare or Medicaid was providing benefits to 22% of the older adults surveyed. Over half (51%) of the older workers reported...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, 41% of workers over age 55 (employed and unemployed) indicated that they have no health care benefits. Medicare or Medicaid was providing benefits to 22% of the older adults surveyed. Over half (51%) of the older workers reported foregoing medical care for themselves or their families, compared to 35% of younger workers. (p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "a majority (58%) of unemployed older respondents...indicated they were not receiving Unemployment Insurance (UI) because they were not eligible. The percentage of younger workers not receiving UI was likewise 58%, though...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "a majority (58%) of unemployed older respondents...indicated they were not receiving Unemployment Insurance (UI) because they were not eligible. The percentage of younger workers not receiving UI was likewise 58%, though roughly half (51%) of those who were not receiving benefits said it was because they were not eligible, and 38% of them said they were not sure whether they were eligible. Of those older workers who reported receiving UI benefits, 69% were very concerned that their benefits would run out or reported that they already had." (p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "two-thirds of both older and younger workers said they are using savings set aside for retirement or other things to help ends meet. (fig. 6, p. 13)

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "two-thirds of both older and younger workers said they are using savings set aside for retirement or other things to help ends meet. (fig. 6, p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "among older workers, 40% rated their financial situation as poor, and 61% said they have adjusted their plans for retirement. Almost the same percentage of younger workers (39%) also rated their financial situation as poor,...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "among older workers, 40% rated their financial situation as poor, and 61% said they have adjusted their plans for retirement. Almost the same percentage of younger workers (39%) also rated their financial situation as poor, but a smaller percentage of them have changed retirement plans (43%). (p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "older and younger job seekers reported that they use the public workforce system programs, such as One-Stop Career Centers (which are established under the Workforce Investment Act), at roughly the same rate (28% and 32%,...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "older and younger job seekers reported that they use the public workforce system programs, such as One-Stop Career Centers (which are established under the Workforce Investment Act), at roughly the same rate (28% and 32%, respectively)." Only 12% of older workers replied that they had have taken a class or training course for skills to get a new job, compared to 20% of younger workers. (fig. 4, p. 12)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, both older and younger workers indicated a willingness to change careers (69% each) to facilitate their gaining new employment. Over three-quarters (77%) of older job seekers said they were willing to take a pay cut, compared...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, both older and younger workers indicated a willingness to change careers (69% each) to facilitate their gaining new employment. Over three-quarters (77%) of older job seekers said they were willing to take a pay cut, compared to 64% of prime age job seekers. In fact, 65% of the older job seekers that found another job did take pay cuts. A higher percentage of younger workers (35%), however, said they were able to relocate for work than older workers (23%). (fig.5, p. 12)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "both younger and older job seekers alike are employing, on average, three to four different job search tools." A larger percentage of older unemployed workers have used newspaper classifieds in their job search (80% compared...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "both younger and older job seekers alike are employing, on average, three to four different job search tools." A larger percentage of older unemployed workers have used newspaper classifieds in their job search (80% compared to 60%), while 38% of younger workers have received help from former employers, compared to 23% of older workers. (fig. 3, p. 10)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, while respondents of all ages reported using the Internet to search for jobs, "younger workers used Internet social networking sites more frequently than older workers: 13% of older unemployed workers reported using online...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, while respondents of all ages reported using the Internet to search for jobs, "younger workers used Internet social networking sites more frequently than older workers: 13% of older unemployed workers reported using online social networking sites to find a job, compared to 28% of younger workers. Of those who used the Internet, the most commonly used tool by older workers was online bulletin boards for companies (56%), while the most common tool used by younger job seekers was Facebook (51%). (fig. 4, p. 11)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, almost 70% of those over age 55 who had stopped seeking work indicated they got tired of looking and had become discouraged, compared to around 33% of those under 55. (fig. 2, p. 9)

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, almost 70% of those over age 55 who had stopped seeking work indicated they got tired of looking and had become discouraged, compared to around 33% of those under 55. (fig. 2, p. 9)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "only 14% of respondents who were 55+ had found new jobs as of March 2010, compared to 37% of the younger job seekers. Two-thirds (66%) of the older job seekers reported still being unemployed and actively seeking work, compared...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "only 14% of respondents who were 55+ had found new jobs as of March 2010, compared to 37% of the younger job seekers. Two-thirds (66%) of the older job seekers reported still being unemployed and actively seeking work, compared to 52% of their prime age counterparts. Of the older workers, a fifth (21%) were still unemployed and had ceased looking for work." (fig. 1, p. 9)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed americans Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "young adults are the least likely age group to say the economy is still in a recession. Some 47% of 18- to 29-year-olds say so, compared with 57% of those ages 30-64 and 51% of those 65 and older." (p 37)

According to a 2010 Pew survey, "young adults are the least likely age group to say the economy is still in a recession. Some 47% of 18- to 29-year-olds say so, compared with 57% of those ages 30-64 and 51% of those 65 and older." (p 37)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2010). How the great recession has changed life in America. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/files/2010/11/759-recession.pdf

This report is based on data from two sources: a comprehensive Pew Research telephone survey of a representative, national sample of 2,967 adults conducted from May 11 to May 31, 2010 (see Appendix for details) and a Pew Research analysis of government economic and demographic trend data.

According to a 2010 report from the Conference Board, among approximately 2400 employees in 13 multinational organizations, "the age group with the highest level of engagement was between 46 and 55 years old (82.2%), and the age group with the lowest level of engagement was younger than 25 (71.3%)."...

According to a 2010 report from the Conference Board, among approximately 2400 employees in 13 multinational organizations, "the age group with the highest level of engagement was between 46 and 55 years old (82.2%), and the age group with the lowest level of engagement was younger than 25 (71.3%)." The engagement levels for employees between 25 and 35 (78.3%), 36 and 45 (78.0), and older than 55 (77.5%) were comparable, ranging from 77.5% to 78.3%. "However, the fact that none of these differences in engagement was statistically significant suggests that no one age group is more or less engaged than another."(p. 4)

Creary, S. J. (2010). Is age really just a number? investigating approaches to employee engagement. (Research Report No. R-1465-10-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

Data in The Conference Board’s 2008 Global Employee Engagement database of approximately 2,400 employees in 13 multinational organizations were analyzed by age group.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "during the period from October 2009 to September 2010, unemployed workers were more likely to be younger, but older unemployed workers were more likely to be out of work for more than 99 weeks. Almost half (48.7%) of unemployed workers were under the age of...

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "during the period from October 2009 to September 2010, unemployed workers were more likely to be younger, but older unemployed workers were more likely to be out of work for more than 99 weeks. Almost half (48.7%) of unemployed workers were under the age of 35, compared to 34.0% of employed workers. On the other hand, 44.4% of workers unemployed for more than 99 weeks were 45 or older. Similarly, workers ages 45 and older were more likely than younger workers to be unemployed for more than 99 weeks. An estimated 10.7% of unemployed workers ages 45 and older were unemployed for more than 99 weeks, compared to 6.0% of unemployed workers under the age of 35." (p. 12)

Mayer, G. (2010, December 10). The trend in long-term unemployment and characteristics of workers unemployed for more than 99 weeks. (CRS Report for Congress No. R41559). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41559.pdf

The analysis in this report is based on data from the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a household survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Conference Board's Global Engagement Survey, "the age group with the highest level of engagement was between 46 and 55 years old [82.2%], and the age group with the lowest level of engagement was younger than 25 [71.3%]. The engagement levels for employees...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Conference Board's Global Engagement Survey, "the age group with the highest level of engagement was between 46 and 55 years old [82.2%], and the age group with the lowest level of engagement was younger than 25 [71.3%]. The engagement levels for employees between 25 and 35, 36 and 45, and older than 55 were comparable [between 77-78%]. However, the fact that none of these differences in engagement was statistically significant suggests that no one age group is more or less engaged than another." (p. 4)

Creary, S. J. (2010). Is age really just a number? investigating approaches to employee engagement. (Research Report No. R-1465-10-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

Data in The Conference Board's 2008 Global Employee Engagement database of approximately 2,400 employees in 13 multinational organizations were analyzed by age group.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "employees in younger generations are more likely than those in older generations to believe working flexibly would have negative consequences. Specifically, employees in the Millennial generation (45%) are...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "employees in younger generations are more likely than those in older generations to believe working flexibly would have negative consequences. Specifically, employees in the Millennial generation (45%) are more likely than employees in the Baby Boom or Mature generations (35% and 26%, respectively) to believe that using flexibility would have negative consequences. In addition, Generation X employees are more likely than employees in the Mature generation to report this belief (39% versus 26%)." (p. 48)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, 44% of workers have access to traditional flextime [that is, arrangements which allow employees to vary when they start and end their work days within a range ofhours surrounding fixed core operating hours]....

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, 44% of workers have access to traditional flextime [that is, arrangements which allow employees to vary when they start and end their work days within a range of
hours surrounding fixed core operating hours]. "Of the 56% of U.S. workers who do not have access [to traditional flextime], two thirds (67%) express a desire for it." Employees without access to traditional flextime who want it are younger workers (74% and 75% of workers from the Millennial and Generation X generations, respectively, compared with 64% and 47% of workers in the Baby Boom and Mature generations, respectively). (p 17-18)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2010 AARP survey, "almost a third (31%) of people aged 18+ rely or plan to rely on Social Security 'in a substantial way' for their retirement income, and over half (55%) of people aged 65+ say they do or plan to. However, nearly four in ten adults under age 35 (39%) say they 'do not...

According to a 2010 AARP survey, "almost a third (31%) of people aged 18+ rely or plan to rely on Social Security 'in a substantial way' for their retirement income, and over half (55%) of people aged 65+ say they do or plan to. However, nearly four in ten adults under age 35 (39%) say they 'do not plan to rely on Social Security at all' for their retirement income." (p. 2)

AARP. (2010). AARP bulletin survey on social security. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/bulletin_socsec.pdf

The survey was conducted by AARP via telephone by SSRS from May 12-16, 2010 among a nationally representative sample of 1,004 respondents aged 18 and older.

According to a 2012 analysis of CPS data, "in 2010, among youths who were in the labor force for 27 weeks or more, 15.5 percent of 20- to 24-year-olds were in poverty, about double the rate for workers age 35 to 44 (7.3 percent). Workers age 45 to 54 (4.9 percent), 55 to 64 (3.4 percent), and 65 and...

According to a 2012 analysis of CPS data, "in 2010, among youths who were in the labor force for 27 weeks or more, 15.5 percent of 20- to 24-year-olds were in poverty, about double the rate for workers age 35 to 44 (7.3 percent). Workers age 45 to 54 (4.9 percent), 55 to 64 (3.4 percent), and 65 and older (2.0 percent) had lower working-poor rates than did other age groups in 2010."

A profile of the working poor, 2010. (2012). (Report No. 1035). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpswp2010.pdf

This report is based on analysis of Current Population Survey data.

According to a 2009 survey on internet use, young people are much more likely than older adults to use social networks. 75% of online adults aged 18-24 have a profile on a social network site, compared to 57% of those aged 25-34, 30% on those 35-44, 19% of those aged 45-54, 10% of 55-64 year olds,...

According to a 2009 survey on internet use, young people are much more likely than older adults to use social networks. 75% of online adults aged 18-24 have a profile on a social network site, compared to 57% of those aged 25-34, 30% on those 35-44, 19% of those aged 45-54, 10% of 55-64 year olds, and 7% of those 65 and older. (p. 2)

Lenhart, A. (2009). Pew internet project data memo [adult social networking]. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Adult_social_networking_data_memo_FINAL.pdf

The main findings on adults' usage of social network sites come from a survey of 2,251 adults between April 8 to May 11, 2008, among a sample of adults, 18 and older. Some 328 respondents in that survey were social network users and the margin of error in that subsample is plus or minus 6 percentage points.

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, the largest percentage of the Gen X'ers and the Older Baby Boomers said that having access to flexible work options contributes to their success as an employee "to a great extent," while the most frequent response from Gen Y'ers, Younger Baby...

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, the largest percentage of the Gen X'ers and the Older Baby Boomers said that having access to flexible work options contributes to their success as an employee "to a great extent," while the most frequent response from Gen Y'ers, Younger Baby Boomers, and Traditionalist was "to a moderate extent." (fig. 2, p. 2)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & Besen, E. (2009). Workplace flexibility: Findings from the age and generations study (Issue Brief No. 19). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB19_WorkFlex_2009-02-04.pdf

The Age & Generations Study team collaborated with 9 organizations (12 departments) to collect three types of data: information about the organization (as a whole) from a key respondent (typically someone from HR), information about a selected department(s) in each organization from a key respondent (typically the department manger), and information about employees from the department(s). In total, 2,210 employees from 12 departments participated in this study. (p. 17)

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, employees from different age/generational groups report they have similar access to different types of flexible work options. For example, between 45-46% of workers have access to between 6 and 10 flexible work options, while 30-34% have access to...

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, employees from different age/generational groups report they have similar access to different types of flexible work options. For example, between 45-46% of workers have access to between 6 and 10 flexible work options, while 30-34% have access to only 0-5 options. (fig. 5, p. 5)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & Besen, E. (2009). Workplace flexibility: Findings from the age and generations study (Issue Brief No. 19). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB19_WorkFlex_2009-02-04.pdf

The Age & Generations Study team collaborated with 9 organizations (12 departments) to collect three types of data: information about the organization (as a whole) from a key respondent (typically someone from HR), information about a selected department(s) in each organization from a key respondent (typically the department manger), and information about employees from the department(s). In total, 2,210 employees from 12 departments participated in this study. (p. 17)

In a 2009 study of access to flexible work options, "Older Boomers and Traditionalists were more likely to report that they use 5 or more of the 19 options. On the other hand, Traditionalists were also more likely to indicate that they do not use any flexible work options when compared to the other...

In a 2009 study of access to flexible work options, "Older Boomers and Traditionalists were more likely to report that they use 5 or more of the 19 options. On the other hand, Traditionalists were also more likely to indicate that they do not use any flexible work options when compared to the other age/generation groups." (Fig. 6 )

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & Besen, E. (2009). Workplace flexibility: Findings from the age and generations study (Issue Brief No. 19). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB19_WorkFlex_2009-02-04.pdf

The Age & Generations Study team collaborated with 9 organizations (12 departments) to collect three types of data: information about the organization (as a whole) from a key respondent (typically someone from HR), information about a selected department(s) in each organization from a key respondent (typically the department manger), and information about employees from the department(s). In total, 2,210 employees from 12 departments participated in this study. (p. 17)

In a 2009 study of access to flexible work options, '"40.6% of the respondents felt that there might be negative career consequences associated with the use of flexible work options (those responding "somewhat agree," "agree," or "strongly agree"). ...Younger Boomers and Traditionalists are more...

In a 2009 study of access to flexible work options, '"40.6% of the respondents felt that there might be negative career consequences associated with the use of flexible work options (those responding "somewhat agree," "agree," or "strongly agree"). ...Younger Boomers and Traditionalists are more likely to strongly disagree/disagree that people who use flexible work options are viewed as being less serious about their career. (fig. 10, p. 11)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & Besen, E. (2009). Workplace flexibility: Findings from the age and generations study (Issue Brief No. 19). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB19_WorkFlex_2009-02-04.pdf

The Age & Generations Study team collaborated with 9 organizations (12 departments) to collect three types of data: information about the organization (as a whole) from a key respondent (typically someone from HR), information about a selected department(s) in each organization from a key respondent (typically the department manger), and information about employees from the department(s). In total, 2,210 employees from 12 departments participated in this study. (p. 17)

According to a 2009 survey comparing the oldest and youngest boomers, "nearly half of the Youngest Boomers (48%) do not like the term "Baby Boomer" to describe themselves at their age, compared to only 17% of the Oldest Boomers. Over one-third (35%) of the Youngest Boomers prefer "Generation X" (those...

According to a 2009 survey comparing the oldest and youngest boomers, "nearly half of the Youngest Boomers (48%) do not like the term "Baby Boomer" to describe themselves at their age, compared to only 17% of the Oldest Boomers. Over one-third (35%) of the Youngest Boomers prefer "Generation X" (those age 32 to 43 in 2008) to describe themselves, a term associated with the generational cohort immediately following the Boomers." (p. 16-17)

MetLife. (2009). Boomer bookends: Insights into the oldest and youngest boomers. Westport, CT: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/mmi-studies-boomer-bookends.pdf

This study compares a nationally representative survey of the Oldest Boomers, those turning age 63 in 2009 to a comparable nationally representative survey of the trailing edge Boomers, those turning age 45 in 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, three-quarters (75%) of adults ages 50-64 say that the nation's current economic problems will make it more difficult for them to afford retirement (harder to meet retirement needs). Two-thirds (67%) of younger adults aged 18-49 and 56% of older 65 and older adults...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, three-quarters (75%) of adults ages 50-64 say that the nation's current economic problems will make it more difficult for them to afford retirement (harder to meet retirement needs). Two-thirds (67%) of younger adults aged 18-49 and 56% of older 65 and older adults share the same concern. (p. 1)

Morin, R., & Taylor, P. (2009). Oldest are most sheltered: Different age groups, different recessions. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/recession-and-older-americans.pdf

This report presents the results of a telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults conducted by the Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends project from Feb. 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "roughly six in ten GenXers (58%) and GenYers (60%) are concerned about losing their jobs over the next 12 months as a result of the downturn, compared with 52% of Boomers and 45% of Silents." (p. 16)

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "roughly six in ten GenXers (58%) and GenYers (60%) are concerned about losing their jobs over the next 12 months as a result of the downturn, compared with 52% of Boomers and 45% of Silents." (p. 16)

MetLife. (2009). The 2009 MetLife study of the American dream. New York: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/gbms/studies/09010229_09AmDreamStudy_WEB.pdf

From January 7 � 16, 2009 by Strategy First Partners in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates conducted 2,243 online surveys in the United States among the general population as part of the 2009 MetLife Study of the American Dream.

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "nearly two in ten (18%) of those surveyed report that they have lost their own job as a result of the current economic situation. An additional 55% know someone (a friend or family member) who has become unemployed. Generations X and Y have been hardest hit, with...

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "nearly two in ten (18%) of those surveyed report that they have lost their own job as a result of the current economic situation. An additional 55% know someone (a friend or family member) who has become unemployed. Generations X and Y have been hardest hit, with 23% of GenXers and 21% of GenYers having lost a job themselves as a result of the current economic crisis, compared to 16% of Boomers and 10% of Silents." (p. 17)

MetLife. (2009). The 2009 MetLife study of the American dream. New York: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/gbms/studies/09010229_09AmDreamStudy_WEB.pdf

From January 7 - 16, 2009 by Strategy First Partners in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates conducted 2,243 online surveys in the United States among the general population as part of the 2009 MetLife Study of the American Dream.

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "two in three homeowners (64%) are concerned they would lose their home if they were to lose their job. Generation X feels the most vulnerable, with 73% of Americans in this demographic group expressing concern. Baby Boomers are the next most vulnerable group, with...

According to a 2009 MetLife Survey, "two in three homeowners (64%) are concerned they would lose their home if they were to lose their job. Generation X feels the most vulnerable, with 73% of Americans in this demographic group expressing concern. Baby Boomers are the next most vulnerable group, with 63% reporting worry. The Silent Generation is least likely to be anxious about home loss (31%)." (p.20)

MetLife. (2009). The 2009 MetLife study of the American dream. New York: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/gbms/studies/09010229_09AmDreamStudy_WEB.pdf

From January 7 - 16, 2009 by Strategy First Partners in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates conducted 2,243 online surveys in the United States among the general population as part of the 2009 MetLife Study of the American Dream.

According to a 2009 telephone survey of almost 3000 adults, "working members of the Threshold Generation (ages 50-64) are the least confident of any age group that they will have enough money to make it through their retirement years. Barely two-in-ten (21%) of those ages 50 to 64 say they are "very...

According to a 2009 telephone survey of almost 3000 adults, "working members of the Threshold Generation (ages 50-64) are the least confident of any age group that they will have enough money to make it through their retirement years. Barely two-in-ten (21%) of those ages 50 to 64 say they are "very confident" that they have enough income and assets to tide them over, compared with 37% of fulltime workers younger than age 30 and 40% of those ages 65 and older."

Morin, R. (2009). Most middle-aged adults are rethinking retirement plans. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1234/the-threshold-generation

The Pew Research findings are based on a telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults conducted from February 23 through March 23, 2013

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "just 5% of adults under age 30 say that where young and old differ most is in their work ethic. But twice as many--10%--of those 30 and older point to this as a major difference." (p. 41)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "just 5% of adults under age 30 say that where young and old differ most is in their work ethic. But twice as many--10%--of those 30 and older point to this as a major difference." (p. 41)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "only about a quarter of the public (26%) says there are strong conflicts these days between young people and older people." However, respondents perceive that there are differences between younger and older generations, "including in the...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "only about a quarter of the public (26%) says there are strong conflicts these days between young people and older people." However, respondents perceive that there are differences between younger and older generations, "including in the way they use new technology (87% say very or somewhat different); their taste in music (86%); their work ethic (80%); their moral values (80%); the respect they show others (78%); their political views (74%); their attitudes toward different races and groups (70%); and their religious beliefs (68%)." (p. 3-4)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "nearly three-quarters (74%) believe that older adults have the superior work ethic. Moreover, this belief bridges the generational divide: Young people agree with their parents' and grandparents' generations that older adults have...

According to a 2009 Pew survey of people aged 16 and older, "nearly three-quarters (74%) believe that older adults have the superior work ethic. Moreover, this belief bridges the generational divide: Young people agree with their parents' and grandparents' generations that older adults have a better work ethic (68% for those under 30 vs. 73% for those 50 and older). It's the 30- somethings and those in early middle age who appear to offer the harshest assessment of young people: About eight-in-ten of those ages 30 to 49 judge the older generation to have better attitudes toward work and a job." (p. 8)

Taylor, P., & Morin, R. (2009). Forty years after Woodstock, a gentler generation gap. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/after-woodstock-gentler-generation-gap.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older living in the continental United States. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, "a rising share of Americans ages 16 to 24 are in school and a declining share are in the labor force -- 57% today versus 66% in 2000."(p. 2)

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, "a rising share of Americans ages 16 to 24 are in school and a declining share are in the labor force -- 57% today versus 66% in 2000."(p. 2)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "people ages 55 and older currently account for 18.7% of the U.S. labor force, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). That is the highest share held by this age group since the BLS started reporting labor force statistics in 1948. Conversely, younger...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "people ages 55 and older currently account for 18.7% of the U.S. labor force, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). That is the highest share held by this age group since the BLS started reporting labor force statistics in 1948. Conversely, younger workers, ages 16 to 24, currently account for only 14.0% of the labor force, their lowest share since 1948." (p. 6)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "nine-in-ten employed adults are either "completely satisfied" (30%) or "mostly satisfied" (60%) with their jobs. Older working adults are the most content: 54% say they are completely satisfied with their jobs." (p. 17)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "nine-in-ten employed adults are either "completely satisfied" (30%) or "mostly satisfied" (60%) with their jobs. Older working adults are the most content: 54% say they are completely satisfied with their jobs." (p. 17)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "adults aged 65 and older who work full time are more content than their colleagues who are younger than 65: 66% say they are completely satisfied with their jobs, compared with 29% of other full-time workers. Among part-time workers, older adults are twice as likely...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "adults aged 65 and older who work full time are more content than their colleagues who are younger than 65: 66% say they are completely satisfied with their jobs, compared with 29% of other full-time workers. Among part-time workers, older adults are twice as likely as their younger part-time colleagues to be completely satisfied with their jobs (49% vs. 28%)." (p. 21)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "workers younger than 65 are nearly three times as likely as their older colleagues to say they work because they need the money (49% vs. 17%). Conversely, older workers are more than two and a half times as likely as younger workers to say they are employed because they...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "workers younger than 65 are nearly three times as likely as their older colleagues to say they work because they need the money (49% vs. 17%). Conversely, older workers are more than two and a half times as likely as younger workers to say they are employed because they want to work (54% vs. 20%), while about equal shares of both age groups say both reasons are equally important to them." (p. 22)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "nearly seven-in-ten older workers (68%) say the desire "to feel like a useful and productive person" is a big reason they work. A similar proportion of younger workers (70%) share this view." (p. 22)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "nearly seven-in-ten older workers (68%) say the desire "to feel like a useful and productive person" is a big reason they work. A similar proportion of younger workers (70%) share this view." (p. 22)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

In a 2009 report on a survey of HR managers of US state agencies, "late-career employees were perceived most positively by state agencies with regard to having low turnover rates, having a strong work ethic, being reliable, and being loyal to the agency in comparison to the early- and mid-career employees....

In a 2009 report on a survey of HR managers of US state agencies, "late-career employees were perceived most positively by state agencies with regard to having low turnover rates, having a strong work ethic, being reliable, and being loyal to the agency in comparison to the early- and mid-career employees. Mid-career employees were considered most likely to want to lead and supervise others, to be productive, to be creative, and to take initiative in comparison to the early- and late-career employees. Early-career employees were perceived the least positively in comparison to the other career stages for all ten of the positive attributes." (fig. 1, p. 4)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "late-career employees were perceived to be the most resistant to change, reluctant to travel, reluctant to try new technologies, burned out, and difficult to train....

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "late-career employees were perceived to be the most resistant to change, reluctant to travel, reluctant to try new technologies, burned out, and difficult to train. Mid-career employees were perceived to take a lot of time from work to deal with personal or family issues, and early-career employees were perceived to often look outside the agency for new career opportunities." (fig. 2, p. 5)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of public-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are reliable and productive. In...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of public-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are reliable and productive. In contrast, a larger percentage of private-sector organizations report that it is true for many or most of their early-career employees that they are burned out and difficult to train." (fig. 3, p. 6)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that it was true for many or most of their mid-career employees that they want to lead and supervise others...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that it was true for many or most of their mid-career employees that they want to lead and supervise others in comparison to public-sector organizations." (fig. 4, p. 7)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that many or most of their late-career employees want to lead and supervise." (fig. 5, p. 8)

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, "a larger percentage of private-sector organizations reported that many or most of their late-career employees want to lead and supervise." (fig. 5, p. 8)

Besen, E., & McNamara, T. (2009). Attitudes toward workers of different career stages (State Issue Brief No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SIB03_Attitudes_2009-06-18.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, 11.6% of the agencies that participated in the survey stated that their agencies had not analyzed the demographics of their workforces at all. Approximately one quarter...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, 11.6% of the agencies that participated in the survey stated that their agencies had not analyzed the demographics of their workforces at all. Approximately one quarter (26.8%) felt that their agencies had pursued this type of analysis "to a great extent." In comparison, 25.8% of the private sector companies that participated in the survey stated that their organizations had not analyzed the demographics of their workforces at all. Approximately 12% felt that their agencies had pursued this type of analysis "to a great extent". (fig. 5, p. 8)

McNamara, T. K., Wong, M., Brown, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2009). States as employers-of-choice (State Research Highlight No. 01). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SRH01_EmployersofChoice.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, approximately the same percentage of agencies that participated in the study indicated that opportunities for on-the-job training are available to early-, mid-, and late-career...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, approximately the same percentage of agencies that participated in the study indicated that opportunities for on-the-job training are available to early-, mid-, and late-career employees. On-the-job training was reported as being available to over 80% of employees in all career stages in both public and private employers, except for late-stage private sector employees (73%). (fig 7a, p. 18)

McNamara, T. K., Wong, M., Brown, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2009). States as employers-of-choice (State Research Highlight No. 01). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SRH01_EmployersofChoice.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, approximately the same percentage of agencies that participated in the study indicated that opportunities for career counseling are available to early-, mid-, and late-career...

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, approximately the same percentage of agencies that participated in the study indicated that opportunities for career counseling are available to early-, mid-, and late-career employees; the range in the private sector was 45.3% for early-career to 34.8 for late-career. In the state sector, the range was 43.4% for early-career to 34.8 for late-career. (fig 7b, p. 18)

McNamara, T. K., Wong, M., Brown, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2009). States as employers-of-choice (State Research Highlight No. 01). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SRH01_EmployersofChoice.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, state agencies were less likely to say that they offer mentoring to employees at mid- (51.6%) or late-career (43.7%) stages compared to the early-career stage (60.6%)....

In a 2009 report comparing responses of HR managers in US state agencies to those of private for-profit and non-profit organizations, state agencies were less likely to say that they offer mentoring to employees at mid- (51.6%) or late-career (43.7%) stages compared to the early-career stage (60.6%). The rates of mentoring opportunities in the private sector were similar, with 64.3% of early-career workers having mentoring available, compared to 57.6 (mid-career) and 43.7% (late-career). (fig. 7c, p. 18)



McNamara, T. K., Wong, M., Brown, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2009). States as employers-of-choice (State Research Highlight No. 01). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/SRH01_EmployersofChoice.pdf

As part of the States as Employers-of-Choice Study, HR managers from a total of 222 state agencies from 27 states responded to a 2008 online survey used to gather information. The results are compared to findings from the Center's National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, a 2006 survey of for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the private sector.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "survey respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 2)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "survey respondents ages 18 to 29 believe that the average person becomes old at age 60. Middle-aged respondents put the threshold closer to 70, and respondents ages 65 and above say that the average person does not become old until turning 74." (p. 2)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "About three-quarters of participants from all generations described Gen Y as "very comfortable" working with people of different ethnicities, cultures and sexual orientations. In contrast, only a quarter of those surveyed perceived Boomers...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "About three-quarters of participants from all generations described Gen Y as "very comfortable" working with people of different ethnicities, cultures and sexual orientations. In contrast, only a quarter of those surveyed perceived Boomers as having that degree of comfort working with different ethnicities and cultures, and only 17 percent saw the older generation as very comfortable with workmates of another sexual orientation." (fig 3.1, p. 6)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "forty-six percent of Boomers had a stay-at-home mother, and only 56 percent had a mother who worked throughout their childhood years. But the numbers nearly reversed for Gen Y, with 74 percent growing up with a working mother and only 26...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "forty-six percent of Boomers had a stay-at-home mother, and only 56 percent had a mother who worked throughout their childhood years. But the numbers nearly reversed for Gen Y, with 74 percent growing up with a working mother and only 26 percent having a mom who stayed at home. Nearly 90 percent of both generations had fathers who worked full-time." (fig. 4.1, p. 18)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "57 percent of African-American Boomers surveyed had mothers who worked compared with 31 percent, 35 percent and 35 percent for Asian, Hispanic and Caucasian Boomers, respectively (full-time plus part-time)....The figures are reversed for...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "57 percent of African-American Boomers surveyed had mothers who worked compared with 31 percent, 35 percent and 35 percent for Asian, Hispanic and Caucasian Boomers, respectively (full-time plus part-time)....The figures are reversed for full time homemakers: only 25 percent of African-American Boomers had stay-at-home moms compared with 48 percent of Caucasians. 9 percent had mothers who were homemakers compared with 27 percent of Caucasians (figs 4.2 & 4.3, p. 10)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "41 percent of Boomers provide monetary support to adult children--those over 22...and 71 percent of women and men have some kind of eldercare responsibility, Twenty-eight percent of Boomers surveyed have both child and elder care responsibilities."...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "41 percent of Boomers provide monetary support to adult children--those over 22...and 71 percent of women and men have some kind of eldercare responsibility, Twenty-eight percent of Boomers surveyed have both child and elder care responsibilities." (p. 35)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, 86% of women and 84% of men report that having a range of new experiences is an important aspect of work. "Seventy-five percent of Boomer men and 89 percent of Boomer women say recognition from a boss is important. Similarly, 74 percent...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, 86% of women and 84% of men report that having a range of new experiences is an important aspect of work. "Seventy-five percent of Boomer men and 89 percent of Boomer women say recognition from a boss is important. Similarly, 74 percent of Boomer men and 87 percent of women say that a good performance evaluation will inspire them to try harder and engage more fully in their jobs. Although 73 percent of Boomers prize a steady rate of advancement and promotion, only 34 percent say having a powerful position with a prestigious title is an important aspect of their careers". (fig. 11. 1, p. 38)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Eighty-seven percent of Boomers rate flexible work arrangements as important. Similar numbers of Boomers prize autonomy in their work (91%). Additionally, 75 percent are motivated to work harder by having the ability to work remotely at...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Eighty-seven percent of Boomers rate flexible work arrangements as important. Similar numbers of Boomers prize autonomy in their work (91%). Additionally, 75 percent are motivated to work harder by having the ability to work remotely at their discretion." (p. 39)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "some 47 percent of Boomers, who are now between 45 and 63 years old, consider themselves in the middle of their careers." (p. 42)

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "some 47 percent of Boomers, who are now between 45 and 63 years old, consider themselves in the middle of their careers." (p. 42)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Forty-seven percent of Ys and 34 percent of Boomers say that it is important that the company they work for offer "mini odysseys" by establishing sabbatical leaves....Asian Boomers value the sabbatical leaves more than Caucasians (79% versus...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "Forty-seven percent of Ys and 34 percent of Boomers say that it is important that the company they work for offer "mini odysseys" by establishing sabbatical leaves....Asian Boomers value the sabbatical leaves more than Caucasians (79% versus 35%). In the Y population, more Hispanics (89%) and Asians (78%) than Caucasians (45%) say that sabbaticals are important. (p. 42)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "86 percent of Boomers and 89 percent of Ys describe flexible work options--from telework to flex-hours--as important." (p. 44)

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "86 percent of Boomers and 89 percent of Ys describe flexible work options--from telework to flex-hours--as important." (p. 44)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "69 percent of Ys and 63 percent of Boomers want to work remotely. In both generations, nearly half of those who want to work remotely only want to work from home one day a week (p. 44)

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "69 percent of Ys and 63 percent of Boomers want to work remotely. In both generations, nearly half of those who want to work remotely only want to work from home one day a week (p. 44)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "66 percent of Gen Y men look to Boomers for professional advice over other generations, and 60 percent look to them for advice on how to deal with colleagues and operate in the workplace. More than half of Gen Y women look to Boomers for...

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "66 percent of Gen Y men look to Boomers for professional advice over other generations, and 60 percent look to them for advice on how to deal with colleagues and operate in the workplace. More than half of Gen Y women look to Boomers for advice in these spheres.... nearly 60 percent of Gen Ys reported having a mentor, and 42 percent of that group's mentors were Boomers." (fig. 13.2 & 13.3, p. 47-8)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "self-employed workers younger than 55 are the group most likely to value the social aspects of their job. For example, 47% of the self employed younger than 55 say they work because they want to be with other people compared with 34% of younger wage and salaried employees."

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "self-employed workers younger than 55 are the group most likely to value the social aspects of their job. For example, 47% of the self employed younger than 55 say they work because they want to be with other people compared with 34% of younger wage and salaried employees."

Morin, R. (2009). Take this job and love it: Job satisfaction highest among the self-employed. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/pubs/743/job-satisfaction-highest-among-self-employed#prc-jump

A total of 1,040 adults ages 16 and older who are employed full or part-time were interviewed July 20-Aug. 2, 2009 for this survey, including 254 self-employed workers and 885 who are wage and salaried workers

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "self-employed workers younger than 55 are the group most likely to value the social aspects of their job. For example, 47% of the self employed younger than 55 say they work because they want to be with other people compared with 34% of younger wage and salaried employees." 

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "self-employed workers younger than 55 are the group most likely to value the social aspects of their job. For example, 47% of the self employed younger than 55 say they work because they want to be with other people compared with 34% of younger wage and salaried employees." 

Morin, R. (2009). Take this job and love it: Job satisfaction highest among the self-employed. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/pubs/743/job-satisfaction-highest-among-self-employed#prc-jump

A total of 1,040 adults ages 16 and older who are employed full or part-time were interviewed July 20-Aug. 2, 2009 for this survey, including 254 self-employed workers and 885 who are wage and salaried workers

According to a 2009 report from the Investment Company Institute, "IRAs have grown to account for 25.4 percent of U.S. retirement wealth and 8.5 percent of total U.S. household financial assets at year-end 2008; 40.5 percent of U.S. households owned some form of IRA at year-end 2008." (p. 1). "Almost...

According to a 2009 report from the Investment Company Institute, "IRAs have grown to account for 25.4 percent of U.S. retirement wealth and 8.5 percent of total U.S. household financial assets at year-end 2008; 40.5 percent of U.S. households owned some form of IRA at year-end 2008." (p. 1). "Almost two-thirds of individuals heading IRA-owning households were between the ages of 35 and 64." (p. 3)

Investment Company Institute. (2009). The evolving role of IRAs in U.S. retirement planning (Research Perspective, Vol. 15, No. 3). Washington, DC: ICI Investment Company Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ici.org/pdf/per15-03.pdf

Data in this report on the demographic and financial characteristics of IRA owners are derived from ICI's IRA Owners Survey. The May 2008 survey was based on a sample of 800 representative U.S. households owning traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, and employer-sponsored IRAs (SIMPLE IRAs, SEP IRAs, and SAR-SEP IRAs).

According to a 2009 survey by the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, 26% of respondents under 40 years of age indicated that they were satisfied with opportunities for education or training, compared to 29% of those over 40 years of age. (Table 2, p. 4)

According to a 2009 survey by the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, 26% of respondents under 40 years of age indicated that they were satisfied with opportunities for education or training, compared to 29% of those over 40 years of age. (Table 2, p. 4)

Van Horn, C., & Zukin, C. (2009). What a difference a decade makes: The declining job satisfaction of the American worker (Work Trends Survey No. 23). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/Work_Trends_December_2009.pdf

This survey was conducted between November 5 and 15, 2009 with 652 respondents in the workforce (currently employed or unemployed and looking for work). Interviews were fielded by Abt/SRBI using a scientific random digit dial telephone survey.

In a 2009 report on education and training of employed persons in Australia, the most common reason for participation in education or training given by employees in the mid-age group (25 to 44 years) was to develop skills for their current job (32.8%), whereas the most common reason for older workers...

In a 2009 report on education and training of employed persons in Australia, the most common reason for participation in education or training given by employees in the mid-age group (25 to 44 years) was to develop skills for their current job (32.8%), whereas the most common reason for older workers (45 years or older) to engage in education or training was to meet a job requirement (29.8%)....Advancing job or career prospects was the most common reason identified by younger people [aged 18-24] (41.1%). " p. 19

Skinner, N. (2009). Worklife issues and participation in education and training. Adelaide, Australia: National Centre for Vocational Education Research. Retrieved from http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/proj/2216.pdf

Using data from the 2009 Australian Work and Life Index (AWALI), this report examines how worklife pressures influence the capacity and motivation of individuals to engage in education and training. The Australian Work and Life Index is an annual national survey of nearly 3000 employed persons and is representative of the Australian working population.

According to a 2009 survey by the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, among all age groups combined, 49% said they were very satisfied with their job overall. Among respondents over age 40, 51% were very satisfied with their jobs overall, compared to 46% of those under age 40. (p. 1 and Table...

According to a 2009 survey by the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, among all age groups combined, 49% said they were very satisfied with their job overall. Among respondents over age 40, 51% were very satisfied with their jobs overall, compared to 46% of those under age 40. (p. 1 and Table 2)

Van Horn, C., & Zukin, C. (2009). What a difference a decade makes: The declining job satisfaction of the American worker (Work Trends Survey No. 23). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/Work_Trends_December_2009.pdf

This survey was conducted between November 5 and 15, 2009 with 652 respondents in the workforce (currently employed or unemployed and looking for work). Interviews were fielded by Abt/SRBI using a scientific random digit dial telephone survey.

According to a 2009 survey by the National Alliance for Caregiving, "the average age of caregivers 18 years of age and older who assist people age 50 or older is 50 years old. Over half (55%) of these caregivers say they are at least 50 years old including a small proportion (5%) age 75 or over (5%)....

According to a 2009 survey by the National Alliance for Caregiving, "the average age of caregivers 18 years of age and older who assist people age 50 or older is 50 years old. Over half (55%) of these caregivers say they are at least 50 years old including a small proportion (5%) age 75 or over (5%). More than one-quarter (27%) of caregivers are between 35 and 49 years of age and about one in five (18%) are 18 to 34 years old." (p. 18)

National Alliance for Caregiving, AARP, & Metlife. (2009). Caregiving in the U.S.: A focused look at those caring for the 50 +. Bethesda, MD: National Alliance for Caregiving. Retrieved from http://www.caregiving.org/data/2009CaregivingAARP_Full_Report.pdf

This report is based on telephone interviews with 1,397 caregivers who are 18 years of age and over who provide assistance to some one 50 years of age or older. The sample includes just over 800 Whites, approximately 200 African-Americans, 200 Hispanics, and 170 Asian-Americans. Caregivers are those who provide unpaid care to an older adult (aged 50+).

According to the 2009 Kelly Global Workforce Survey, among respondents in North America, "65 percent of Gen Y have worked closely with colleagues from a different country or culture in the last two years, higher than for Gen X (64 percent) and baby boomers (62 percent)... Among baby boomers, 78 percent...

According to the 2009 Kelly Global Workforce Survey, among respondents in North America, "65 percent of Gen Y have worked closely with colleagues from a different country or culture in the last two years, higher than for Gen X (64 percent) and baby boomers (62 percent)... Among baby boomers, 78 percent feel they currently have the skills to work in a more globally." For all generations combined, "41 percent say they receive no formal cross-cultural or language training from their employer." (p. 1)

Kelly Services. (2009). International survey reveals how globalization is defining workplace skills. Troy, MI: Kelly Services. Retrieved from http://media.marketwire.com/attachments/EZIR/562/558150_KWGI_Globalization_DEC9.pdf

The findings are part of the 2009 Kelly Global Workforce Index, which obtained the views of approximately 90,000 people in 33 countries across North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific.

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, "employees of the Traditionalist generation (ages 63 and older) are the most engaged in their jobs overall, with an 84% employee engagement level. The engagement levels of the other groups are within a relatively narrow range of 77%-80%," with baby boomers at...

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, "employees of the Traditionalist generation (ages 63 and older) are the most engaged in their jobs overall, with an 84% employee engagement level. The engagement levels of the other groups are within a relatively narrow range of 77%-80%," with baby boomers at 77%, Generation X at 78%, and Generation Y at 80%.

WorldatWork. (2008). Employee engagement differences across generations relatively small. Retrieved May 20, 2008, from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=25544

Sirota Survey Intelligence conducted a major study of cross-generational attitudes of more than 300,000 workers in more than 50 organizations that the employee attitude research firm surveyed during 2006 and 2007. The research included employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs, pride in working for their employers, whether they would recommend their organizations as a place to work, and their willingness to put forth extra effort.

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, traditionalists (age 63 and older) with between two and five years tenure have an engagement level of 85%--10 percentage points higher than that for Generation Y and Baby Boomers (75%), and 9 percentage points higher than that for Generation X (76%)" with comparable...

According to a 2008 WorldatWork report, traditionalists (age 63 and older) with between two and five years tenure have an engagement level of 85%--10 percentage points higher than that for Generation Y and Baby Boomers (75%), and 9 percentage points higher than that for Generation X (76%)" with comparable tenure.

WorldatWork. (2008). Employee engagement differences across generations relatively small. Retrieved May 20, 2008, from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=25544

Sirota Survey Intelligence conducted a major study of cross-generational attitudes of more than 300,000 workers in more than 50 organizations that the employee attitude research firm surveyed during 2006 and 2007. The research included employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs, pride in working for their employers, whether they would recommend their organizations as a place to work, and their willingness to put forth extra effort.

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, 69% of baby boomers rate as important the trait "readily shares knowledge with co-workers" and 71% report that the trait describes themselves. In contrast, 53% of GenY employees rate that trait as important and 56% feel that it describes themselves. Among...

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, 69% of baby boomers rate as important the trait "readily shares knowledge with co-workers" and 71% report that the trait describes themselves. In contrast, 53% of GenY employees rate that trait as important and 56% feel that it describes themselves. Among GenX employees, the rates are 62% important and 63% describes themselves. Matures have the highest rates on this trait, with 69% rating it as important and 83% reporting that it describes themselves. (Fig. 20, p. 24)

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2008). The world of work 2008. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.us.randstad.com/2008WorldofWork.pdf

The findings in this report are "based on 3,494 interviews conducted online. Among these are 1,295 employers and 2,199 employees in the United States who completed interviews. The Harris Poll Online panel was the sample source for this research. Two random samples were drawn from the larger population for each segment of employees and employers. All interviews were collected between December 14, 2007 and January 16, 2008. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed full-time or selfemployed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months."

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, competitive pay was believed to be the most important benefit related to happiness at work for 71% of GenY employees, 70% of GenX employes, 73% of Baby Boomers and 78% of Matures. Health insurance was the next most important, with 67%, 61%, 68% and 74%...

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, competitive pay was believed to be the most important benefit related to happiness at work for 71% of GenY employees, 70% of GenX employes, 73% of Baby Boomers and 78% of Matures. Health insurance was the next most important, with 67%, 61%, 68% and 74% for GenX, GenY, Boomers, and Matures, respectively. (Fig. 2, p. 9)

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2008). The world of work 2008. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.us.randstad.com/2008WorldofWork.pdf

The findings in this report are "based on 3,494 interviews conducted online. Among these are 1,295 employers and 2,199 employees in the United States who completed interviews. The Harris Poll Online panel was the sample source for this research. Two random samples were drawn from the larger population for each segment of employees and employers. All interviews were collected between December 14, 2007 and January 16, 2008. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed full-time or selfemployed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months."

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, flexible work options were believed to be related to happiness at work by 54% of workers of all ages combined. For specific generational groups, the proportion ranking flexible work options as important were: GenY workers, 52%; GenX, 54%; Baby Boomers,...

In a 2008 survey of over 2000 U.S. employees, flexible work options were believed to be related to happiness at work by 54% of workers of all ages combined. For specific generational groups, the proportion ranking flexible work options as important were: GenY workers, 52%; GenX, 54%; Baby Boomers, 47%; and Matures 51%. (Fig. 2, p. 9)

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2008). The world of work 2008. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.us.randstad.com/2008WorldofWork.pdf

The findings in this report are "based on 3,494 interviews conducted online. Among these are 1,295 employers and 2,199 employees in the United States who completed interviews. The Harris Poll Online panel was the sample source for this research. Two random samples were drawn from the larger population for each segment of employees and employers. All interviews were collected between December 14, 2007 and January 16, 2008. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed full-time or selfemployed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months."

According to data from a 2006 national survey, psychological distress is highest among 17-44 year olds; it decreases for 45-64 year olds, and then increases slightly among 65-79 year olds. Adults 50 years of age and older are less likely than younger adults to exhibit serious psychological distress...

According to data from a 2006 national survey, psychological distress is highest among 17-44 year olds; it decreases for 45-64 year olds, and then increases slightly among 65-79 year olds. Adults 50 years of age and older are less likely than younger adults to exhibit serious psychological distress in the preceding year.(fig. 3, p. 3)


Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

A 2008 report using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce suggests that wage and salaried workers aged 54 and older are more likely to report being "very satisfied" with their lives than younger workers. (fig. 6, p. 4)

A 2008 report using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce suggests that wage and salaried workers aged 54 and older are more likely to report being "very satisfied" with their lives than younger workers. (fig. 6, p. 4)


Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

Among participants in a 2007 survey on health care concerns, "young people (ages 18 to 34) are more concerned about their dental needs (44 percent) and protecting themselves from the consequences of major accidents (38 percent). Seniors tend to be much more concerned about managing major medical events...

Among participants in a 2007 survey on health care concerns, "young people (ages 18 to 34) are more concerned about their dental needs (44 percent) and protecting themselves from the consequences of major accidents (38 percent). Seniors tend to be much more concerned about managing major medical events (49 percent) or the requirements of long-term care (47 percent).

Cordina, J., & Singhal, S. (2008). What consumers want in health care. The McKinsey Quarterly, (June) Retrieved from http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Health_Care/Strategy_Analysis/What_consumers_want_in_health_care_2145_abstract

In this 2007 McKinsey survey, some 3,000 people who have the option of choosing a health insurer were questioned about their health care concerns, perceptions, and purchasing behavior.

According to a 2008 survey on internet use among workers, "employed internet users ages 18-29 are more than twice as likely to blog when compared with 30-49 year olds (20% vs. 9%). However, young adults are no more likely to report at-work tending to their blog; just 2% say they blog from work. Blog...

According to a 2008 survey on internet use among workers, "employed internet users ages 18-29 are more than twice as likely to blog when compared with 30-49 year olds (20% vs. 9%). However, young adults are no more likely to report at-work tending to their blog; just 2% say they blog from work. Blog reading is also most prevalent among younger generations of employed internet users. One in three internet-using employees (33%) say they have read someone else's blog or online journal, and 11% report at least some at-work reading. However, among young working adults, 46% are blog readers, compared with 33% of 30-49 year olds and 25% of employed internet users ages 50-64. At-work blog reading is equally prevalent among all of these groups."

Madden, M., & Jones, S. (2008). Networked workers. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewresearch.org/pubs/966/networked-workers

April 2008 results based on a sample of 807 "employed email users." The 2008 sample includes those who may use personal accounts for work-related email.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that among those aged 18-29, 44% have never left their hometowns, compared with 35% of those aged 30-49, and 37% of Americans ages 50-64 and those aged 65 and older. (p. 7) Two-thirds of young adults, ages 18-29, have not lived outside their state of birth, but they...

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that among those aged 18-29, 44% have never left their hometowns, compared with 35% of those aged 30-49, and 37% of Americans ages 50-64 and those aged 65 and older. (p. 7) Two-thirds of young adults, ages 18-29, have not lived outside their state of birth, but they also are the most likely to say that they probably will move within five years. Among all older age groups, about 55% have never lived outside their birth state (p. 11)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that older Americans are more likely than younger ones to have lived in four or more states. Looking at the combined impact of age and gender, 25% of men and 15% of women ages 50 and older say they have lived in four or more states. (p. 13)

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that older Americans are more likely than younger ones to have lived in four or more states. Looking at the combined impact of age and gender, 25% of men and 15% of women ages 50 and older say they have lived in four or more states. (p. 13)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that "one-in-three Americans who have moved at least once did so within the past five years. Two-thirds of movers ages 18-29, the prime moving years, say they have relocated within the past five years. That is double the share of recent movers among Americans ages...

A 2008 survey of U.S. adults shows that "one-in-three Americans who have moved at least once did so within the past five years. Two-thirds of movers ages 18-29, the prime moving years, say they have relocated within the past five years. That is double the share of recent movers among Americans ages 30-49 and more than triple the share of recent movers among Americans ages 50-64. (p. 23)

Cohn, D., & Morin, R. (2008). American mobility: Who moves? who stays put? where's home?. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/Movers-and-Stayers.pdf

Results for this survey are based on telephone interviews conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,260 adults living in the continental United States.

According to a 2008 Metlife survey, "17% of Singles and Young Families, on average, have not begun to save for retirement, while only an average of 10% of older workers, Baby Boomers and Pre-Retirees, have not begun saving. Nearly half of employees, 47%, say they are behind schedule in saving for retirement,...

According to a 2008 Metlife survey, "17% of Singles and Young Families, on average, have not begun to save for retirement, while only an average of 10% of older workers, Baby Boomers and Pre-Retirees, have not begun saving. Nearly half of employees, 47%, say they are behind schedule in saving for retirement, while 14% say they have yet to begin that process." (p. 20)

Metlife. (2008). Study of employee benefits trends: Findings from the 6th annual Metlife national survey of employers and employees. New York: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved from http://www.whymetlife.com/trends/downloads/MetLife_EBTS08.pdf

The 6th annual MetLife Study of Employee Benefits Trends was conducted during the third quarter of 2007 and consisted of two distinct studies fielded by GfK Custom Research North America. The employer survey comprised 1,652 interviews with benefits decision-makers at companies with a minimum of two employees. The employee survey polled 1,380 full-time employees, age 21 and over, at companies with at least two employees. (p. 60)

According to a 2007 McKinsey survey, "young people (ages 18 to 34) are more concerned about their dental needs (44 percent) and protecting themselves from the consequences of major accidents (38 percent). Seniors tend to be much more concerned about managing major medical events (49 percent) or the...

According to a 2007 McKinsey survey, "young people (ages 18 to 34) are more concerned about their dental needs (44 percent) and protecting themselves from the consequences of major accidents (38 percent). Seniors tend to be much more concerned about managing major medical events (49 percent) or the requirements of long-term care (47 percent)."

McKinsey & Company. (2008). What consumers want in health care. Retrieved 12/23/2008 from http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Health_Care/Strategy_Analysis/What_consumers_want_in_health_care_2145?gp=1

This is a summary of a 2007 McKinsey survey of 3,000 people who have the option of choosing a health insurer about their health care concerns, perceptions, and purchasing behavior.

In a 2008 study on substance use problems, it was found that "problem use was greater among younger workers ages 18-29 years, with more than half of these workers reporting one of the four types of use [illicit drug use only, problem drinking only, heavy drinking only, or both drug use and problem/heavy...

In a 2008 study on substance use problems, it was found that "problem use was greater among younger workers ages 18-29 years, with more than half of these workers reporting one of the four types of use [illicit drug use only, problem drinking only, heavy drinking only, or both drug use and problem/heavy drinking]. Although 30-49 year olds had a lower rate of substance-use problems, 4 out of every 10 male workers in this age group reported problem use". Among workers aged 50-64, 16% of men reported problem drinking. (p. 917)

Waehrer, G. M., Zaloshnja, E., Miller, T., & Galvin, D. (2008). Substance-use problems: Are uninsured workers at greater risk? Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 69(6), 915-923.

This study used data from the 2002-2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The NSDUH is an annual survey of approximately 70,000 people conducted by SAMHSA. (p. 916)

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "older employees are less likely to report the following situations: they have to work fast, they have a high chance of injury on the job, and the work is physically demanding and tiring." (fig. 3, p. 6)

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "older employees are less likely to report the following situations: they have to work fast, they have a high chance of injury on the job, and the work is physically demanding and tiring." (fig. 3, p. 6)

McNamara, T. K., Ollier-Malaterre, A., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2008). Mind the gap: United states - employee perspective. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/MTG_US%20Employee_2008-11-20.pdf

This paper examines the preferences and perceptions of young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older employees in the U.S. about the quality of their employment experiences, based on analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, the World Values Survey, and other sources.

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "younger employees (32.8%) are less likely than employees at midlife (43.3%) or older employees (45.2%) to have high scores with regard to indicators of the meaningfulness of their jobs." (fig.4, p. 7)

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "younger employees (32.8%) are less likely than employees at midlife (43.3%) or older employees (45.2%) to have high scores with regard to indicators of the meaningfulness of their jobs." (fig.4, p. 7)




McNamara, T. K., Ollier-Malaterre, A., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2008). Mind the gap: United states - employee perspective. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/MTG_US%20Employee_2008-11-20.pdf

This paper examines the preferences and perceptions of young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older employees in the U.S. about the quality of their employment experiences, based on analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, the World Values Survey, and other sources.

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "younger employees (42.8%) are more likely than employees at midlife (34.0%) or older employees (36.5%) to report that they have access to more flexibility at work: hard to take time off; ability to choose start & quit time;...

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that "younger employees (42.8%) are more likely than employees at midlife (34.0%) or older employees (36.5%) to report that they have access to more flexibility at work: hard to take time off; ability to choose start & quit time; ability to choose start & quit time on a daily basis; ability to work part-time; ability to work part-year; ability to work compressed work week." (fig. 6, p. 9)

McNamara, T. K., Ollier-Malaterre, A., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2008). Mind the gap: United states - employee perspective. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/MTG_US%20Employee_2008-11-20.pdf

This paper examines the preferences and perceptions of young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older employees in the U.S. about the quality of their employment experiences, based on analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, the World Values Survey, and other sources.

A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control indicates that "the percentage of adults reporting insufficient rest or sleep every day during the preceding 30 days generally declined with age. The percentage was highest among persons aged 25--34 years (13.8%) and lowest among persons aged 65 or...

A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control indicates that "the percentage of adults reporting insufficient rest or sleep every day during the preceding 30 days generally declined with age. The percentage was highest among persons aged 25--34 years (13.8%) and lowest among persons aged 65 or more years (7.4%)." (Table 1)

Perceived insufficient rest or sleep among adults --- United States, 2008.(2009). MMWR Weekly, 58(42), 1175-1179. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5842a2.htm

This report is based on data from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population aged ?18 years, which is conducted by state health departments in collaboration with CDC.

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 46.7% of employers report  that older workers (late career) are more likely than employees at mid-life (mid career) and young employees (early career) to have more skills than are needed for a job.  36% of employers...

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 46.7% of employers report  that older workers (late career) are more likely than employees at mid-life (mid career) and young employees (early career) to have more skills than are needed for a job.  36% of employers feel that older workers are more likely to want to lead and supervise than employees at the other two career stages.*



*Shen, C. (2007). [Analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce]. Unpublished raw data.

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). The 21st century multi-generational workplace (Issue Brief No. 09). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB09_MultiGenWorkplace_001.pdf

In this Issue Brief, we explore how age “matters” at the workplace; how perspectives about age differ according to chronological age, generation, life state and carreer stage; and the implications for managers who supervise young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older adult employees.

According to a 2005 analysis of BLS data, the baby boomers, those born between 1946-1964 are shown represent the largest segment (48%) of the U.S. labor force in 2000.  By 2010, the baby boomers labor force participation is expected to represent only 37% of the labor force.Gunderson, S., Roberts,...

According to a 2005 analysis of BLS data, the baby boomers, those born between 1946-1964 are shown represent the largest segment (48%) of the U.S. labor force in 2000.  By 2010, the baby boomers labor force participation is expected to represent only 37% of the labor force.



Gunderson, S., Roberts, J., and Scanland, K. (2005). The Jobs Revolution: Changing How America Works, 2nd edition. Chicago, IL: The Greystone Group.



Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). The 21st century multi-generational workplace (Issue Brief No. 09). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB09_MultiGenWorkplace_001.pdf

In this Issue Brief, we explore how age “matters” at the workplace; how perspectives about age differ according to chronological age, generation, life state and career stage; and the implications for managers who supervise young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older adult employees.

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce*, employees at mid-life and older are more likely to report that they have access to employer-sponsored training than younger employees;  67% of workers aged 50+ report having access to training opportunities,...

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce*, employees at mid-life and older are more likely to report that they have access to employer-sponsored training than younger employees;  67% of workers aged 50+ report having access to training opportunities, compared to 56% of workers 18-30 years of age.



*Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. (2007). National Study of the Changing Workforce. Unpublished raw data, Families and Work Institute


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

"This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older)." (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers respond that is it "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger professional networks (46.3%) and client networks (44.4%).  Fewer than 30% of employers feel that it...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, employers respond that is it "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger professional networks (46.3%) and client networks (44.4%).  Fewer than 30% of employers feel that it is very true that their younger (early and mid-career) counterparts have such networks .


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

"This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older)." (p. 1)

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, "employers were more likely to report that they have offered on the job training to their early-career (88.1%) and mid-career (82.7%) employees than to their late-career employees (73.4%) in response to...

According to a 2007 analysis of the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, "employers were more likely to report that they have offered on the job training to their early-career (88.1%) and mid-career (82.7%) employees than to their late-career employees (73.4%) in response to the changing age demographics of the workforce. Less than half of the employers reported that they offer career counseling to employees at any stage, and they were less likely to offer this to late-career employees than early-career and mid-career employees. Finally, although nearly half (45.5%) of the employers stated that they offer mentoring to their late-career employees, organizations were more likely to provide this degree of mentoring to early-career employees than to mid-career employees and late-career employees" (p. 14)


Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

A 2007 analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce found that only 21% of young adult workers said they had more skills than needed for their jobs, compared to 46.7% of older adult workers.

A 2007 analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce found that only 21% of young adult workers said they had more skills than needed for their jobs, compared to 46.7% of older adult workers.

Shen, C. (2007). [Analysis of the National Study of the Changing Workforce]. Unpublished raw data

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Dwevelopment is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work / Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Data on employer response to the aging workforce was gathered for a sample of 578 nongovernmental organizations with 50 or more employees.

In a 2007 survey of human resource professionals at over 500 organizations, 22.4 percent said it was very true that early-career employees were loyal to the company, compared to 53.8 percent who said late-career employees were loyal to the company. (p.8)

In a 2007 survey of human resource professionals at over 500 organizations, 22.4 percent said it was very true that early-career employees were loyal to the company, compared to 53.8 percent who said late-career employees were loyal to the company. (p.8)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work / Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Data on employer response to the aging workforce was gathered for a sample of 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees.

According to a 2007 Center for Creative Leadership survey, 70% of workers trust their boss and 60% say they trust their peers, whereas 54% of workers trust their organizations to keep its promises; the older and younger generations have similar perceptions about trusting their colleagues and employers....

According to a 2007 Center for Creative Leadership survey, 70% of workers trust their boss and 60% say they trust their peers, whereas 54% of workers trust their organizations to keep its promises; the older and younger generations have similar perceptions about trusting their colleagues and employers. (p. 54).

Deal, J. J. (2007). Retiring the generation gap : How employees young and old can find common ground (1st ed.). San Francisco, CA: Wiley : Center for Creative Leadership.

In a survey conducted by the Center for Creative Leadership, 3,200 people employed in large for-profit and non-profit organizations who were both born in and are currently living in the United States completed a survey between the years of 2000-2005. Survey respondants were between the ages of 19 and 80 at the time of the study.  41% were men, and 59% were women.  Of the people who identified themselves by race, 88% self-identified as white, 6% as black, 1% as Asian, 2% as multiracial, and 3% as other.  The participants have educational levels higher than the average of the general population. (p. 6-7)

Among the top 10 HR challenges noted by employers in a 2007 national study, encouraging employees to remain with the organization was reported as being an HR challenge to a great extent for early-career employees (41.6%), mid-career employees (17.3%), and late-career employees (17.3%).

Among the top 10 HR challenges noted by employers in a 2007 national study, encouraging employees to remain with the organization was reported as being an HR challenge to a great extent for early-career employees (41.6%), mid-career employees (17.3%), and late-career employees (17.3%).

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

In a 2007 national study, 40.3% of the respondants stated that their organizations offer training to supervisors so that they can provide career advice to employees at different stages of their careers. (p. 14)

In a 2007 national study, 40.3% of the respondants stated that their organizations offer training to supervisors so that they can provide career advice to employees at different stages of their careers. (p. 14)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Organizations responding to a 2007 national survey estimated that similar percentages of their early-career, mid-career, and late-career employees use flexible work options (16.7% early-career, 17.1% mid-career, and 17.3% late-career). (p. 16)

Organizations responding to a 2007 national survey estimated that similar percentages of their early-career, mid-career, and late-career employees use flexible work options (16.7% early-career, 17.1% mid-career, and 17.3% late-career). (p. 16)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

In a 2007 survey of human resource professionals, "approximately 2 of every 5 (39.7%) of the employers stated that they train their supervisors on managing a multi-generational workforce. (p. 17)

In a 2007 survey of human resource professionals, "approximately 2 of every 5 (39.7%) of the employers stated that they train their supervisors on managing a multi-generational workforce. (p. 17)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% that is was "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with co-workers of other generations.  For early career employees, 20.8% of employers reported this concern, compared to 15.2% for mid-career...

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% that is was "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with co-workers of other generations.  For early career employees, 20.8% of employers reported this concern, compared to 15.2% for mid-career and  and 20.7% for late-career employees. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% indicated that it is "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with supervisors of other generations.  For early career employees, 21.6% of employers reported this concern, compared to...

Among employers responding to a 2007 national survey, approximately 20% indicated that it is "true/very true" that their employees [in all career stages] do not work well with supervisors of other generations.  For early career employees, 21.6% of employers reported this concern, compared to 17.7% for mid-career and and 22.4% for late-career employees. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

Approximately 25% of employers responding to a 2007 national survey stated that it is "true/very true" that early-career  (26.5%) and late-career (25.3%) employees are difficult to train.  For mid-career employees, 19.7% reported that this concern. (p. 20)

Approximately 25% of employers responding to a 2007 national survey stated that it is "true/very true" that early-career  (26.5%) and late-career (25.3%) employees are difficult to train.  For mid-career employees, 19.7% reported that this concern. (p. 20)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 76% of Mature workers said "Freedom to set own hours if the work gets done" is appealing, compared to 74% of Baby Boomers, 73% of Generation X workers, and 63 % of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 76% of Mature workers said "Freedom to set own hours if the work gets done" is appealing, compared to 74% of Baby Boomers, 73% of Generation X workers, and 63 % of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p....

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 90% of Mature workers rated being "Ethical" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 84% of Baby Boomers, 83% of Generation X workers, and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31) Generations are defined as: Generation...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 90% of Mature workers rated being "Ethical" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 84% of Baby Boomers, 83% of Generation X workers, and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 74% of Mature workers and 70% of Baby Boomers rated being "Professional" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 63% of Generation X workers and 48% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31) Generations are defined as: Generation...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 74% of Mature workers and 70% of Baby Boomers rated being "Professional" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 63% of Generation X workers and 48% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

According to a 2007 AARP report, 43.6% of workers 62 and older worked at a job that required computer use, compared with 49.3% of workers ages 50-61, 44.9%% of workers ages 26-49, and 25.9% of workers 25 and younger. (Table 3, p. 21)

According to a 2007 AARP report, 43.6% of workers 62 and older worked at a job that required computer use, compared with 49.3% of workers ages 50-61, 44.9%% of workers ages 26-49, and 25.9% of workers 25 and younger. (Table 3, p. 21)

Johnson, R. W., Mermin, G., & Resseger, M. (2007). Employment at older ages and the changing nature of work. Washington D.C.: AARP. Retrieved February 18, 2008 from http://www.aarp.org/research/work/employment/2007_20_work.html

This paper examines employment trends and the challenges older adults face in the workplace.The study used detailed occupational characteristics from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) to examine job demands. It linked this information to individual workers in the March 1971 and March 2006 Current Population Surveys.

Data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development shows that 47% of employers report that older employees/late career employees have higher levels of skills than needed for their jobs, while 36% reported that older/late career employees are more likely to want to lead...

Data from the 2007 National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development shows that 47% of employers report that older employees/late career employees have higher levels of skills than needed for their jobs, while 36% reported that older/late career employees are more likely to want to lead or supervise others when compared to employers' assessments of young employees. Also, 15.8% of employers reported that their older workers are more reluctant to try new technologies than younger workers. (fig. 2, p. 2)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, 65% of employees at mid-life (31-49 years) and 67% of employees aged 50 and older reported that they have access to employer-sponsored training, compared to 56% of younger employees (aged 18-30). (fig. 3, p. 3)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, 65% of employees at mid-life (31-49 years) and 67% of employees aged 50 and older reported that they have access to employer-sponsored training, compared to 56% of younger employees (aged 18-30). (fig. 3, p. 3)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, young employees (aged 18-30) have an average of 6.4 years in the labor force, compared to 21.3 years for employees aged 31-49; and 34.8 for older employees aged 50 and older. Similarly, there is a relationship between tenure with...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, young employees (aged 18-30) have an average of 6.4 years in the labor force, compared to 21.3 years for employees aged 31-49; and 34.8 for older employees aged 50 and older. Similarly, there is a relationship between tenure with current employer and the age of employees (an average of 2.2 years tenure for young employees; 7.6 years for employees at mid-life; and 12.4 years for older employees). (fig. 4, p. 4)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 44.4% of employers report that it is "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger customer and client networks, compared to 29.6% of mid-career and 15.8% of early career employees. For...

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 44.4% of employers report that it is "very true" that their older adult/late career employees have stronger customer and client networks, compared to 29.6% of mid-career and 15.8% of early career employees. For professional networks, 46.3% of employers stated that it was very true that older employees have strong professional networks, compared to 29.4% and 16.5% for mid- and early-career employees, respectively. (fig. 5, p. 4)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, the average number of paid vacation days offered to older employees (16.5 days) is higher than the average either for employees at midlife (14.5 days) or young employees (9.5 days). Higher percentages of employees at mid-life...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, the average number of paid vacation days offered to older employees (16.5 days) is higher than the average either for employees at midlife (14.5 days) or young employees (9.5 days). Higher percentages of employees at mid-life (81%) and older (79%) workers report that they have access to personal health insurance paid in part or full by their employers, compared to 66% of younger workers. (fig. 6, p. 5)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, when compared to young employees, approximately three fourths of employees at mid-life and older have access to guaranteed benefit pension plans, and 40% have access to 401k (or similar) retirement plans. For younger employees...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, when compared to young employees, approximately three fourths of employees at mid-life and older have access to guaranteed benefit pension plans, and 40% have access to 401k (or similar) retirement plans. For younger employees (aged 18-30) only 26% report having access to guaranteed benefit pension plans and 61% to 401K plans. (fig. 7, p. 6)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, older employees (32%) are more likely to report high commitment to employers than either young employees (23%) or employees at mid-life (28%). (fig. 8, p. 7)

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, older employees (32%) are more likely to report high commitment to employers than either young employees (23%) or employees at mid-life (28%). (fig. 8, p. 7)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 56% of workers aged 50 and older report a high level of job satisfaction, compared to 35% with moderate and 9% with low satisfaction. In comparison, 45% of employees in their middle years (aged 31-49) report high...

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 56% of workers aged 50 and older report a high level of job satisfaction, compared to 35% with moderate and 9% with low satisfaction. In comparison, 45% of employees in their middle years (aged 31-49) report high satisfaction, while 45% in that age group report moderate and 11% low. More younger workers have low (13%) and moderate (52%) satisfaction, with 35% reporting high satisfaction. (fig. 9, p. 8)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, among labor force participants, approximately half of workers of all ages reported average mental health. Among younger workers (aged 18-30), almost one-third demonstrated symptoms of poor mental health, compared...

According to 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, among labor force participants, approximately half of workers of all ages reported average mental health. Among younger workers (aged 18-30), almost one-third demonstrated symptoms of poor mental health, compared to 16.6% of older workers. Good mental health was reported by approximately 20% of younger workers, 22.9% of middle aged workers, and 32.4% of older workers. (fig. 10, p. 9)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 37% of employees between the ages of 31-49 years report feeling "often/very often" overwhelmed by the amount of work they have to do on the job, compared to 33% for workers over 50 years of age and 18-30 years of...

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 37% of employees between the ages of 31-49 years report feeling "often/very often" overwhelmed by the amount of work they have to do on the job, compared to 33% for workers over 50 years of age and 18-30 years of age. (fig. 11, p. 9)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees in a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with the following perceptions about older workers,"the...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees in a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with the following perceptions about older workers,"the responses are significantly more negative with each successive generation, from Traditionalists to Generation Y: the ability of older workers to serve as mentors; seeing older workers as reliable; deeming them to be more productive than younger workers; seeing them as adaptable to new technology; eager for training; and flexible". (Fig 2. p. 4)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, "the Baby...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, "the Baby Boom Generation agrees significantly less than do the other three groups that older workers are "respected," with no significant differences among the responses of the other three groups. Those from Generation X agree significantly less than those from the other three groups that older workers are interested in being promoted. In terms of perceiving that older workers are "just as likely to be promoted" as younger workers, the two older generations' responses did not differ significantly, however both the Traditionalists Generation and the Baby Boom Generation agree with this statement significantly less than those from generations X and Y do." (fig. 4, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

A 2007 report on a suvery of employees in a national retail chian, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of employee engagement, employees from the three older generations who perceived equal...

A 2007 report on a suvery of employees in a national retail chian, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of employee engagement, employees from the three older generations who perceived equal promotion opportunities for older workers ranked significantly higher in employee engagement than those who did not. In comparison, the youngest group of employees, those from generation Y, reported significantly lower levels of employee engagement when they perceived workers over 55 had the same opportunities for promotion as younger workers. (fig. 5, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

In a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chaain, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of psychological well-being, employees among the two older generations who perceive...

In a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chaain, when workers of different generations were asked about their perceptions regarding opportunities for promotion for older workers and on their levels of psychological well-being, employees among the two older generations who perceive equal opportunities for older workers scored significantly higher in well-being than those who perceive an unfair advantage for younger workers. (Fig. 6, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that 32.4% of workers 50 and older describe themselves as having good mental health, while 51% claim to have average mental health, and 16.6% have poor mental health. Comparatively, workers aged 31-49 report at rates of...

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that 32.4% of workers 50 and older describe themselves as having good mental health, while 51% claim to have average mental health, and 16.6% have poor mental health. Comparatively, workers aged 31-49 report at rates of 22.9% (good), 50.5% (average), and 26.6% (poor). Workers aged 18-30 self-report rates of 19.4% (good), 49.3% (average), and 31.2% (poor). (Fig. 10, p. 9)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of "human capital costs and benefits" to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

According to a 2007 analysis of data gathered in a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when asked about whether or not they agreed that older workers were respected, were interested in promotion, or were like to get a promotion, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, and Traditionalists...

According to a 2007 analysis of data gathered in a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when asked about whether or not they agreed that older workers were respected, were interested in promotion, or were like to get a promotion, Generation X, Generation Y, Baby Boomers, and Traditionalists all agreed the most that older workers were respected.  Gen. X and Gen. Y believed that older workers were more likely to be promoted than they were interested in promotions, and Baby Boomers and Traditionalists believed that olders workers were just as likely to be promoted as they were intersted in promotion.  (Fig. 4, p. 5)


James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

A 2007 analysis of the March 1977 and 2007 Current Population Surveys indicates that when the Baby Boomers were entering the workforce in 1977, the vast majority of workers were in one of three generations: The Silent Generation (23.6 percent), the Traditionalists (39.6 percent), and the Boomers (36.4...

A 2007 analysis of the March 1977 and 2007 Current Population Surveys indicates that when the Baby Boomers were entering the workforce in 1977, the vast majority of workers were in one of three generations: The Silent Generation (23.6 percent), the Traditionalists (39.6 percent), and the Boomers (36.4 percent). Today, as the Baby Boomers are exiting the labor force, the majority of workers are spread across four generations: The Traditionalists (8.5 percent), the Boomers (39.9 percent), Generation X (35.7 percent), and Generation Y (15.8 percent).

McNamara, T. K. (2007). [Analysis of the March 1977 and 2007 Current Population Surveys]. Unpublished raw data.

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, the older...

According to a 2007 report on a survey of employees of a national retail chain, when workers of different generations were asked the extent to which they agreed or disagreed (1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=neutral; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree) with various perceptions about older workers, the older generations are more positive in their responses regarding older employees' ability to work well with younger supervisors and to be loyal to the company. (fig. 3, p. 4)

James, J. B., Swanberg, J. E., & McKechnie, S. P. (2007). Generational differences in perceptions of older workers' capabilities (Issue Brief No. 12). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB12_OlderWorkers%20Capability.pdf

Using data gathered as part of a larger study comprising employees in 388 stores and 37 districts of a national, retail chain, perceptions of older workers across four generations were examined, while also studying the effects of these perceptions on the older workers themselves. (p. 3)

According to a 2006 MetLife study of adults aged 55-70. "the oldest workers surveyed (age 66-70) were significantly more likely to identify their employers as 'very loyal' (53%) than their younger peers. In contrast, among aging Boomers (age 55-59), the percentage of workers characterizing their...

According to a 2006 MetLife study of adults aged 55-70. "the oldest workers surveyed (age 66-70) were significantly more likely to identify their employers as 'very loyal' (53%) than their younger peers. In contrast, among aging Boomers (age 55-59), the percentage of workers characterizing their employer as 'very loyal' drops to 30%." (p.16)

MetLife Mature Market Institute. (2006, April). Living longer, working longer: The changing landscape of the aging workforce- a MetLife Study.  New York, NY: MetLife Mature Market Institute, DeLong, D., & Zogby International.  Retrieved August 10, 2006, from http://www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/93703586101144176243V1FLivingLonger.pdf

"This study describes the decisions that older workers are actually making about work and retirement. It reports on their experiences more than their expectations of the journey into retirement, assuming that life stage is not defined by some date, but is rather an ongoing process… It consisted of an interactive online survey conducted by Zogby with a panel of 2,719 respondents. To qualify for the study, participants had to be between the ages of 55-70. Slight weights were added to region, race and gender to more accurately reflect the population of U.S. adults. A primary focus of the 50-question survey was to better understand the experiences and behaviors of the aging workforce, so the survey included many questions asked only of people who were still working or seeking work, either full- or part-time.”

According to 2006 analysis of data from the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, more than half (60%) of the respondents felt it was "true" that their organizations understand the importance of treating employees at all stages of their careers with respect and recognize the...

According to 2006 analysis of data from the National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development, more than half (60%) of the respondents felt it was "true" that their organizations understand the importance of treating employees at all stages of their careers with respect and recognize the accomplishments of employees at all stages of their careers (53%). (p.18, fig.10)


Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Kane, K., Smyer, M. A., & Shen, C. (2006). The benchmark study: Summary report (Research Highlight No. 03). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 25, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH03_BenchmarkStudy_12-06_002.pdf

The Benchmark Study" is the first phase in "The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development (NSBSWD)" conducted by the Boston College Center on Aging and Work/Workplace Flexibility. "The Benchmark Study" invited two groups of employers to participate in the study: those who had been recognized as "early adaptors" to the changing age demographics of the workforce, and those who had identified the aging of the workforce as a priority issue for their organizations. Phase II of the NSBSWD then invited approximately 500 U.S. businesses with 50 or more employees to participate in "The National Study." (See Research Highlights No. 4 for results from phase II).

According to a 2006 AARP survey of business executives, "more than eight in ten (83%) "strongly" or "somewhat" agreed that workers who are approaching traditional retirement age will play a greater role in the U.S. workforce over the next decade than in previous decades." (p. 3)

According to a 2006 AARP survey of business executives, "more than eight in ten (83%) "strongly" or "somewhat" agreed that workers who are approaching traditional retirement age will play a greater role in the U.S. workforce over the next decade than in previous decades." (p. 3)

AARP. (2006). Business executives' attitudes toward the aging workforce: Aware but not prepared?. Washington, DC: AARP Knowledge Management. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/aging_workforce.pdf

Over 1,000 business executives--including chief executive officers and other "c"-level executives, senior vice presidents, vice presidents, and general managers--completed the online survey between July 10 and July 23, 2006. All respondents were from companies with at least 100 employees worldwide, with slightly more than half (56%) from organizations with at least 1,000 employees

In a 2005 analysis of National Health Interview Survey data, among employed working-age adults aged 55-64, 38% reported experiencing work-related injuries, compared to 37.9% for aged 45-54, 33.4% for those 35-44, 38.9% for those 25-34, and 41.2% for ages 18-24. (Table 2, p. 1216)

In a 2005 analysis of National Health Interview Survey data, among employed working-age adults aged 55-64, 38% reported experiencing work-related injuries, compared to 37.9% for aged 45-54, 33.4% for those 35-44, 38.9% for those 25-34, and 41.2% for ages 18-24. (Table 2, p. 1216)

Smith, G. S., Wellman, H. M., Sorock, G. S., Warner, M., Courtney, T. K., Pransky, G. S., et al. (2005). Injuries at work in the US adult population: Contributions to the total injury burden. American Journal of Public Health, 95(7), 1213-1219

The 1997-1999 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was used to estimate injury rates and proportions of work-related vs non-work-related injuries.

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often resentment between workers of different generations occurred, 8% of human resource professionals said frequently, 29% said occasionally, 45% said rarely, and 18%...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often resentment between workers of different generations occurred, 8% of human resource professionals said frequently, 29% said occasionally, 45% said rarely, and 18% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Burke, M. E. (2004). Generational differences survey report. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

In a 2004 SHRM survey of human resource professionals, when asked what their organizations were doing or had done to deal with the multi-generational workplace, 50 percent of human resource professionals mentioned that keeping workers of different age groups apart was an unsuccessful approach, while...

In a 2004 SHRM survey of human resource professionals, when asked what their organizations were doing or had done to deal with the multi-generational workplace, 50 percent of human resource professionals mentioned that keeping workers of different age groups apart was an unsuccessful approach, while 98 percent mentioned communicating information in multiple ways (such as via e-mail and during meetings) as very, moderately, or slightly successful.


Burke, M. E. (2004). Generational differences survey report. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management

"This survey report explores the issues--positive and negative--inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to a 2004 Families and Work study, "Twenty-two percent of Boomers are work-centric, compared with 12 to 13 percent of other generations." (p.7)

According to a 2004 Families and Work study, "Twenty-two percent of Boomers are work-centric, compared with 12 to 13 percent of other generations." (p.7)

Families and Work Institute (2004). Generation & gender in the workplace. Watertown, MA: American Business Collaboration

"This issue brief used data from the 1992, 1997, and 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) and the 1977 Quality of Employment Survey to examine gender and generational differences in the workforce. "When data for this study was collected in 2002, members of Generation Y were 18 through 22 years old, and members of Generation X were 23 through 37 years old, compared with Baby Boomers, who were 38 through 57, and Matures, who were over 58. This brief moves beyond speculation and hype, by bringing a rigorous analysis to the debates and discussions." (p.7)

According to a 2004 report from the Families and Work Institute, comparing work priorities of older and younger workers, 22% of boomers are work-centric, comparerd to 12-13% of Gen-Y and Gen-X. In contrast, 50-52% of younger workers are family-centric, compared with 41% of boomers. Similar numbers of...

According to a 2004 report from the Families and Work Institute, comparing work priorities of older and younger workers, 22% of boomers are work-centric, comparerd to 12-13% of Gen-Y and Gen-X. In contrast, 50-52% of younger workers are family-centric, compared with 41% of boomers. Similar numbers of boomers and younger workers are dual centric (35-37%).  Mature workers (58 or older) are most likely to be dual-centric (54%). 

Familes and Work Institute. (2004). Generation and gender in the workplace. Watertown, MA: American Business Collaboration. Retrieved August 16, 2007 from http://www.abcdependentcare.com/docs/ABC-generation-gender-workplace.pdf

"The research findings reported here are drawn from the Families and Work Institute National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). The NSCW is conducted every five years, beginning in 1992 and most recently in 2002. This representative sample of approximately 3,500 workers includes both wage and salaried employees, self-employed workers, and business owners. The data presented here pertain only to wage and salaried employees, ranging in number from 2,800-2,900 across the three administrations of the survey." (p. 33)

Results from a 2004 Pew survey on Internet use show that "older Baby Boomer Internet users (between 50-58 years old) are more like Generation X Internet users (between 28 and 39 years old) than like their older “Mature” generational neighbors (those between 59 and 68 years old). "59% of Generation...

Results from a 2004 Pew survey on Internet use show that "older Baby Boomer Internet users (between 50-58 years old) are more like Generation X Internet users (between 28 and 39 years old) than like their older “Mature” generational neighbors (those between 59 and 68 years old). "59% of Generation X Internet users and 55% of Baby Boomer Internet users do research online for their job, compared to 30% of Internet users between 59 and 68 years old." (p. iii)

Fox, S. (2004). Older Americans and the Internet. Washington, DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/117/report_display.asp

This Pew Internet & American Life Project report is based on the findings of daily tracking surveys on Americans' use of the Internet in 2003 and 2004. The most recent survey data was gathered through telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates between February 3 and March 1, 2004, among a sample of 2,204 adults, aged 18 and older.

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "boomers are less likely (36%) than Gen-X (50%) and Matures (55%) to report high levels of support from their supervisors for succeeding on the job when their supervisors are significantly younger." (p. 6)

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "boomers are less likely (36%) than Gen-X (50%) and Matures (55%) to report high levels of support from their supervisors for succeeding on the job when their supervisors are significantly younger." (p. 6)

Families and Work Institute. (2004). Older employees in the workforce: A companion brief to: Generations and gender in the workplace. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/olderworkers.pdf

This report draws upon data from Families and Work Institutes 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. Older employees are defined as members of the Mature generation (58 or more years old in 2002 when data were collected). Younger employees are members of three generations-- the Baby Boom (post World War II or 38-57 year olds), Generation X (23-37 year olds), and Generation Y (18-22 year olds) in 2002.

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among employees with significantly younger supervisors, 59% strongly agreed and 27% somewhat agreed that their supervisors were very competent in their jobs. Only 10% somewhat disagreed and 5% strongly disagreed that their supervisors...

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among employees with significantly younger supervisors, 59% strongly agreed and 27% somewhat agreed that their supervisors were very competent in their jobs. Only 10% somewhat disagreed and 5% strongly disagreed that their supervisors are very competent. (table 2, p. 4)

Families and Work Institute. (2004). Older employees in the workforce: A companion brief to: Generations and gender in the workplace. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/olderworkers.pdf

This report draws upon data from Families and Work Institutes 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. Older employees are defined as members of the Mature generation (58 or more years old in 2002 when data were collected . Younger employees are members of three generations: the Baby Boom (post World War II or 38-57 year olds), Generation X (23-37 year olds), and Generation Y (18-22 year olds) in 2002.

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "boomers are less likely (36%) than Gen-X (50%) and Matures (55%) to report high levels of support from their supervisors for succeeding on the job when their supervisors are significantly younger." (p. 4)

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "boomers are less likely (36%) than Gen-X (50%) and Matures (55%) to report high levels of support from their supervisors for succeeding on the job when their supervisors are significantly younger." (p. 4)

Families and Work Institute. (2004). Older employees in the workforce: A companion brief to: Generations and gender in the workplace. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/olderworkers.pdf

This report draws upon data from Families and Work Institutes 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. Older employees are defined as members of the Mature generation (58 or more years old in 2002 when data were collected ). Younger employees are members of three generations -- the Baby Boom (post World War II or 38-57 year olds), Generation X (23-37 year olds), and Generation Y (18-22 year olds) in 2002.

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among "boomers", 21% reported that their supervisors are significantly older than they are, while 56% have supervisors about the same age and 23% have significantly younger supervisors. Among Gen-X and Gen-Y workers, 64% and 82%, respectively,...

According to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, among "boomers", 21% reported that their supervisors are significantly older than they are, while 56% have supervisors about the same age and 23% have significantly younger supervisors. Among Gen-X and Gen-Y workers, 64% and 82%, respectively, have significantly older supervisors, while 71% of "Matures" have significantly younger supervisors. (table 1, p. 3)

Families and Work Institute. (2004). Older employees in the workforce: A companion brief to: Generations and gender in the workplace. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/olderworkers.pdf

This report draws upon data from Families and Work Institutes 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce. Older employees are defined as members of the Mature generation (58 or more years old in 2002 when data were collected . Younger employees are members of three generationsthe Baby Boom (post World War II or 38 57 year olds), Generation X (23 37 year olds), and Generation Y (18 22 year olds) in 2002.

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM),  "most human resource professionals (60%) said they were not aware of intergenerational conflict among employees at their organization, while 40% said they were aware of conflict."...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM),  "most human resource professionals (60%) said they were not aware of intergenerational conflict among employees at their organization, while 40% said they were aware of conflict." (p. 4)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals from nonprofit organizations reported a larger percentage of Veterans [those workers ages 60 or older] in their workforce (12%) than did those from for-profit...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals from nonprofit organizations reported a larger percentage of Veterans [those workers ages 60 or older] in their workforce (12%) than did those from for-profit organizations (9%), while respondents from for-profit organizations reported a larger percentage of GenXers [those workers ages 25-39] in their workforce (36%) than did those from nonprofit organizations (31%)." (p.18)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals who work in the public or government sector reported more Baby Boomers [those workers ages 40-59] (47%) and fewer Nexters [those workers ages 24 and younger]...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals who work in the public or government sector reported more Baby Boomers [those workers ages 40-59] (47%) and fewer Nexters [those workers ages 24 and younger] (9%) in their organizations compared with respondents from the private sector, who reported that their organizations, on average, employ 42% of Baby Boomers and 13% of Nexters." (p.18)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "forty percent of respondents [human resource professionals] say they have not faced retention issues related to intergenerational workforce at their organization." (p. 8)

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "forty percent of respondents [human resource professionals] say they have not faced retention issues related to intergenerational workforce at their organization." (p. 8)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals from large organizations were much more likely to report such retention challenges [related to the intergenerational workforce] than those from organizations...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), "human resource professionals from large organizations were much more likely to report such retention challenges [related to the intergenerational workforce] than those from organizations with fewer than 500 employees (62% of respondents from large organizations compared with only 39% from small and 33% from medium organizations)." (p. 8)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often workers from different generations worked effectively together at their organization, 51% of human resource professionals said frequently, 46% said occasionally,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often workers from different generations worked effectively together at their organization, 51% of human resource professionals said frequently, 46% said occasionally, and 3% said rarely. (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often workers from different generations learned from one another at their organization, 31% of human resource professionals said frequently, 55% said occasionally, and...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often workers from different generations learned from one another at their organization, 31% of human resource professionals said frequently, 55% said occasionally, and 15% said rarely.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often better quality of work was produced due to a variety of generational perspectives at their organization, 27% of human resource professionals said frequently, 55%...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often better quality of work was produced due to a variety of generational perspectives at their organization, 27% of human resource professionals said frequently, 55% said occasionally, 15% said rarely, and 3% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often conflicts regarding acceptable work hours between workers of different generations occurred, 24% of human resource professionals said frequently, 42% said occasionally,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often conflicts regarding acceptable work hours between workers of different generations occurred, 24% of human resource professionals said frequently, 42% said occasionally, 29% said rarely, and 5% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees felt coworkers from other generations did not respect them, 20% of human resource professionals said frequently, 45% said occasionally, 30% said rarely,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees felt coworkers from other generations did not respect them, 20% of human resource professionals said frequently, 45% said occasionally, 30% said rarely, and 6% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often communication breakdowns between workers of different generations occurred, 19% of human resource professionals said frequently, 57% said occasionally, 22% said rarely,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often communication breakdowns between workers of different generations occurred, 19% of human resource professionals said frequently, 57% said occasionally, 22% said rarely, and 2% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often intergenerational mentoring occurred, 16% of human resource professionals said frequently, 41% said occasionally, 35% said rarely, and 8% said never.  (Table...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often intergenerational mentoring occurred, 16% of human resource professionals said frequently, 41% said occasionally, 35% said rarely, and 8% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often perspectives of workers from two or more different generations balanced each other, 14% of human resource professionals said frequently, 54% said occasionally, 29%...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often perspectives of workers from two or more different generations balanced each other, 14% of human resource professionals said frequently, 54% said occasionally, 29% said rarely, and 3% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees stated that coworkers from other generations were over- or underreliant on technology, 14% of human resource professionals said frequently, 45% said occasionally,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees stated that coworkers from other generations were over- or underreliant on technology, 14% of human resource professionals said frequently, 45% said occasionally, 33% said rarely, and 8% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees took coworkers from other generations less seriously, 13% of human resource professionals said frequently, 47% said occasionally, 33% said rarely, and 8%...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), when asked how often employees took coworkers from other generations less seriously, 13% of human resource professionals said frequently, 47% said occasionally, 33% said rarely, and 8% said never.  (Table 1, p. 2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 58% of human resource professionals from large (500-or-more employee) organizations were aware of instances of intergenerational conflict among employees at their organizations, compared...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 58% of human resource professionals from large (500-or-more employee) organizations were aware of instances of intergenerational conflict among employees at their organizations, compared to 34% of HR professionals at medium  (100-499 employees) organizations and 31% of HR professionals at small (1-99 employees) organizations. (Figure 2, p. 5)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 48% of human resource professionals surveyed said that the frequency of workplace conflict between employees of different generations has stayed about the same over the last five years,...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 48% of human resource professionals surveyed said that the frequency of workplace conflict between employees of different generations has stayed about the same over the last five years, compared to 23% who said that it decreased (somewhat and significantly) and 28% who said that it increased (somewhat and significantly).  (Figure 3, p. 6)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 40% of human resource professionals surveyed said that they expected the frequency of workplace conflict between employees of different generations to remain about the same over the last...

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 40% of human resource professionals surveyed said that they expected the frequency of workplace conflict between employees of different generations to remain about the same over the last five years, compared to 27% who expect it to decrease (somewhat and significantly) and 33% who expect it to increase (somewhat and significantly). (Figure 3, p. 6)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 30% of human resource managers said that there were complaints about reporting to a younger manager at their organization (Figure 6, p. 8)

According to the 2004 Generational Differences Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 30% of human resource managers said that there were complaints about reporting to a younger manager at their organization (Figure 6, p. 8)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2003, December). 2003 Generational Differences. Survey Report. Alexandria, VA: Burke, E. M.

"This survey report explores the issues•positive and negative•inherent in managing an intergenerational workforce. HR professionals have shared their experiences with intergenerational conflict and cooperation and the most effective methods of engaging workers from across generations....An email with the survey's Web address was sent to 2000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 1,511 messages were successfully delivered to respondents, and 258 HR professionals responded, yielding a reponse rate of 18%."

According to a 2003 Work Trends survey, "half (50%) of workers age 18-29 believe there are steps they can take to avert job loss, compared to 39% of workers age 30-49 and 29% of workers 50 and older. (p. 11)

According to a 2003 Work Trends survey, "half (50%) of workers age 18-29 believe there are steps they can take to avert job loss, compared to 39% of workers age 30-49 and 29% of workers 50 and older. (p. 11)

Dixon, K. A., & Van Horn, C. E. (2003). The disposable worker: Living in a job loss economy (Work Trends Survey No. 6.2). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/Disposable%20Worker.pdf

The employee survey was conducted from June 10 - 21, 2003 by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis (CSRA) at the University of Connecticut. This report is based on a total of 1,015 telephone interviews completed with adult members of the workforce in the contiguous United States.

According to a 2003 Work Trends survey, "among workers age 18-29 [who experienced job loss], only 21% received severance, compared to 33% of workers age 30-49 and 35% of those age 50 and older." (p. 15)

According to a 2003 Work Trends survey, "among workers age 18-29 [who experienced job loss], only 21% received severance, compared to 33% of workers age 30-49 and 35% of those age 50 and older." (p. 15)

Dixon, K. A., & Van Horn, C. E. (2003). The disposable worker: Living in a job loss economy (Work Trends Survey No. 6.2). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/Disposable%20Worker.pdf

The employee survey was conducted from June 10 - 21, 2003 by the Center for Survey Research and Analysis (CSRA) at the University of Connecticut. This report is based on a total of 1,015 telephone interviews completed with adult members of the workforce in the contiguous United States.

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