Volunteerism

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According to a 2014 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "by age, 35- to 44-year-olds were most likely to volunteer (30.6%). Volunteer rates were lowest among 20- to 24-year-olds (18.5%). For persons 45 years and over, the volunteer rate tapered off as age increased. Teens (16- to 19-year-olds)...

According to a 2014 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "by age, 35- to 44-year-olds were most likely to volunteer (30.6%). Volunteer rates were lowest among 20- to 24-year-olds (18.5%). For persons 45 years and over, the volunteer rate tapered off as age increased. Teens (16- to 19-year-olds) had a volunteer rate of 26.2%."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014). Volunteering rate at 25.4 percent for year ending September 2013 : The Editor's desk. Retrieved February 28, 2014, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2014/ted_20140228.htm

These data were collected through a supplement to the September 2013 Current Population Survey.

According to a 2014 analysis of data from a survey by Merrill Lynch, "compared to those in pre-retirement careers, retirees who are employed "are nearly five times more likely to work part-time (83% vs. 17%) and three times more likely to be self-employed (32% vs. 11%)" They are also more likely to...

According to a 2014 analysis of data from a survey by Merrill Lynch, "compared to those in pre-retirement careers, retirees who are employed "are nearly five times more likely to work part-time (83% vs. 17%) and three times more likely to be self-employed (32% vs. 11%)" They are also more likely to volunteers 20 hours per week or more (13% vs. 1%). (p. 11)

Merrill Lynch. (2014). Work in retirement: Myths and motivations. U. S.: Merrill Lynch. Retrieved from http://www.wealthmanagement.ml.com/publish/content/application/pdf/GWMOL/MLWM_Work-in-Retirement_2014.pdf

This report is based on a nationally representative survey of 1,856 working retirees and nearly 5,000 pre-retirees and non-working retirees. This study, which was completed in March 2014, was conducted in partnership with Age Wave and executed online by TNS. Findings in this report are based on a sample of 3,503 respondents age 25+, representative of the U.S. national population by age, income, gender, and geography. The report also includes findings based on an oversample of 1,856 working retirees age 50+ who self-identified as both 'retired' and 'working.'

According to a 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the 2012 volunteer rate (the percentage of the population who volunteered at least once between September 2011 and September 2012) was 26.5 percent.  "By age, 35- to 44-year-olds were most likely to volunteer (31.6 percent). Volunteer rates...

According to a 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, the 2012 volunteer rate (the percentage of the population who volunteered at least once between September 2011 and September 2012) was 26.5 percent.  "By age, 35- to 44-year-olds were most likely to volunteer (31.6 percent). Volunteer rates were lowest among 20- to 24-year-olds (18.9 percent)." For persons aged 45-54, 55-64, and 65+, the volunteer rates were 29.3%, 27.6%, and 24.4%, respectively.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2013). Volunteering in the United States--2012. (Report No. USDL-13-0285). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/volun_02222013.htm

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2012 Current Population Survey (CPS). The supplement was sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service.

According to a 2013 AARP report, there is little difference across the generations in involvement in volunteer work. Among Boomers (ages 48-66) 22% report involvements in volunteer activites, compared to 23% of those in the "Silent" generation (ages 67-83) and 24% in the "Greatest" (age 84+).

According to a 2013 AARP report, there is little difference across the generations in involvement in volunteer work. Among Boomers (ages 48-66) 22% report involvements in volunteer activites, compared to 23% of those in the "Silent" generation (ages 67-83) and 24% in the "Greatest" (age 84+).

AARP. (2013). Civic engagement among mid-life and older adults: Findings from the 2012 survey on civic engagement. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2012/Civic-Engagement-Among-Mid-Life-and-Older-Adults-Findings-from-the-2012-Survey-on-Civic-Engagement-AARP.pdf

This report is based on a telephone survey conducted by AARP in June 2012, using a random sample of 1,500 adults 45+ (including1,000 AARP members).

According to a 2012 BLS report, "by age, 35- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 54-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (31.8 and 30.6 percent, respectively). Persons in their early twenties were the least likely to volunteer (19.4 percent)." Among 55-64 year-olds and those age 65+, the rates declined...

According to a 2012 BLS report, "by age, 35- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 54-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (31.8 and 30.6 percent, respectively). Persons in their early twenties were the least likely to volunteer (19.4 percent)." Among 55-64 year-olds and those age 65+, the rates declined to 28.1% and 24%, respectively.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Volunteer rate rises in 2011. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2012/ted_20120223.htm

These data were collected through a supplement to the September 2011 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2012 BRS report, the volunteer rate rose by 0.5 percentage point to 26.8 percent for the year ending in September 2011. From September 2010 to September 2011, about 64.3 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once. By age, 35- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 54-year-olds...

According to a 2012 BRS report, the volunteer rate rose by 0.5 percentage point to 26.8 percent for the year ending in September 2011. From September 2010 to September 2011, about 64.3 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once. By age, 35- to 44-year-olds and 45- to 54-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (31.8 and 30.6 percent, respectively). Persons in their early twenties were the least likely to volunteer (19.4 percent).

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Volunteer rate rises in 2011. The editor's desk. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2012/ted_20120223.htm

These data were collected through a supplement to the September 2011 Current Population Survey (CPS).

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, among employers responding to the survey, "community volunteer programs ...were offered by 43% of organizations." (p. 60)

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, among employers responding to the survey, "community volunteer programs ...were offered by 43% of organizations." (p. 60)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee benefits report: The employee benefits landscape in a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/research/surveyfindings/articles/documents/2012_empbenefits_report.pdf

In January 2012, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,500 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,200 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 550 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%.

According to a 2011 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "in the year ending in September 2010, 35- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (32.2 percent of the population). Persons aged 16 to 24 were the least likely to volunteer (18.4 percent)." For adults aged 45-54 and 55-64, the...

According to a 2011 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "in the year ending in September 2010, 35- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to volunteer (32.2 percent of the population). Persons aged 16 to 24 were the least likely to volunteer (18.4 percent)." For adults aged 45-54 and 55-64, the rates were 30.3% and 27.2%, respectively, while 23.6% of those 65 years and older volunteered during the same period.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Volunteering in 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved January 31, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110128.htm

These data were collected through a supplement to the September 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS).

According to a 2011 analysis of U.S. Census data, among the total voting age population, between 1964 and 2010, there was an overall decline in voting, with 69.3% voting in 1964 compared 41.8% in 2010. Among persons aged 45-64 years of age, the percentage of the population who voted declined from 75.9%...

According to a 2011 analysis of U.S. Census data, among the total voting age population, between 1964 and 2010, there was an overall decline in voting, with 69.3% voting in 1964 compared 41.8% in 2010. Among persons aged 45-64 years of age, the percentage of the population who voted declined from 75.9% in 1964 to 51.1% in 2010. Among person 65 years and over, the percentage of voters also declined; 66.3% voted in 1964, compared to 58.9% in 2010.

Sloan Center on Aging & Work. (2011). Unpublished analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Time Series Table A-1. Retreived from http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/socdemo/voting/publications/historical/index.html

According to a 2011 report from the Corporation for National and Community Service, "only 63.5 percent of the volunteers who served in 2009 returned to service again in 2010, which is two percentage points lower than the volunteer retention rate between 2008 and 2009, which was 65.5 percent." (p. 3)

According to a 2011 report from the Corporation for National and Community Service, "only 63.5 percent of the volunteers who served in 2009 returned to service again in 2010, which is two percentage points lower than the volunteer retention rate between 2008 and 2009, which was 65.5 percent." (p. 3)

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2011). New report: Americans devote 8.1 billion hours to volunteering in 2010 . Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/FactSheetFinal.pdf

Data are collected each year through a supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS) September Volunteer Supplement.

According to a 2011 report from the Corporation for National and Community Service, Generation X volunteers (born 1965-1981) devoted more time to service in 2010 than they everhave before, giving more than 2.3 billion hours -- an increase of almost 110 million hours over 2009. Generation X members more...

According to a 2011 report from the Corporation for National and Community Service, Generation X volunteers (born 1965-1981) devoted more time to service in 2010 than they everhave before, giving more than 2.3 billion hours -- an increase of almost 110 million hours over 2009. Generation X members more than doubled their volunteer rate between 1989 and the present day, from 12.3 percent in 1989 to 29.2 percent in 2010....After middle age, volunteering rates begin to drop as age increases." (p. 1)

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2011). New report: Americans devote 8.1 billion hours to volunteering in 2010. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/FactSheetFinal.pdf

Data are collected each year through a supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS) September Volunteer Supplement.

According to a 2010 AARP report, "volunteering rates decreased with increasing age. Generation X reported the highest rates of volunteering of the last 12 months (78%); compared with 71% of Baby Boomers, and 69% of the Silent Generation, and just under a third of those in the Greatest Generation." (p....

According to a 2010 AARP report, "volunteering rates decreased with increasing age. Generation X reported the highest rates of volunteering of the last 12 months (78%); compared with 71% of Baby Boomers, and 69% of the Silent Generation, and just under a third of those in the Greatest Generation." (p. 40)

Williams, A., Fries, J., Koppen, J., & Prisuta, R. (2010). Connecting and giving: A report on how mid-life and older Americans spend their time, make connections and build communities. Washington, DC: AARP Knowledge Management. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/connecting_giving.pdf

This report presents the results of a telephone survey of 1,475 Americans age 45 years and older (i.e. members of the Baby Boom, Silent, and Greatest generations) and, for comparative purposes, 500 members of Generation X (ages 29-44). The survey was conducted in August, 2009.

According to a 2010 AARP report, "41% of respondents aged 45+ had attended community activities or meetings; 35% had written, phoned or emailed an elected official; 35% had worked with neighbors on a community problem; 30% had attended a local neighborhood association meeting." (p. 4)

According to a 2010 AARP report, "41% of respondents aged 45+ had attended community activities or meetings; 35% had written, phoned or emailed an elected official; 35% had worked with neighbors on a community problem; 30% had attended a local neighborhood association meeting." (p. 4)

Williams, A., Fries, J., Koppen, J., & Prisuta, R. (2010). Connecting and giving: A report on how mid-life and older Americans spend their time, make connections and build communities. Washington, DC: AARP Knowledge Management. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/connecting_giving.pdf

This report presents the results of a telephone survey of 1,475 Americans age 45 years and older (i.e. members of the Baby Boom, Silent, and Greatest generations) and, for comparative purposes, 500 members of Generation X (ages 29-44). The survey was conducted in August, 2009.

According to a 2010 AARP report, "In 2003 and 2009, 51 percent of survey respondents reported volunteering in the prior year. Volunteers in the 2003 study, however, reported spending an average of 15 hours a month in volunteer service. In 2009, volunteers report spending an average of 6-10 hours per...

According to a 2010 AARP report, "In 2003 and 2009, 51 percent of survey respondents reported volunteering in the prior year. Volunteers in the 2003 study, however, reported spending an average of 15 hours a month in volunteer service. In 2009, volunteers report spending an average of 6-10 hours per month in service--a decline of 5-9 hours per month over the 6-year time period." (p. 2)

Williams, A., Fries, J., Koppen, J., & Prisuta, R. (2010). Connecting and giving: A report on how mid-life and older Americans spend their time, make connections and build communities. Washington, DC: AARP Knowledge Management. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/connecting_giving.pdf

This report presents the results of a telephone survey of 1,475 Americans age 45 years and older (i.e. members of the Baby Boom, Silent, and Greatest generations) and, for comparative purposes, 500 members of Generation X (ages 29-44). The surveywas conducted in August, 2009.

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "by age, 35- to 44-year olds and 45- to 54-year olds were the most likely to volunteer. Their volunteer rates were 31.5 percent and 30.8 percent, respectively, in 2009. Volunteer rates were lowest among persons in their early twenties (18.8...

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "by age, 35- to 44-year olds and 45- to 54-year olds were the most likely to volunteer. Their volunteer rates were 31.5 percent and 30.8 percent, respectively, in 2009. Volunteer rates were lowest among persons in their early twenties (18.8 percent) and those age 65 and over (23.9 percent)." (Table 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Volunteering in the United States, 2009. Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "median annual hours spent on volunteer activities ranged from a low of 36 hours for those 25 to 34 years old to a high of 90 hours for volunteers age 65 and over. The 20- to 24-year-old group showed the largest over-the-year change in...

According to a 2010 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "median annual hours spent on volunteer activities ranged from a low of 36 hours for those 25 to 34 years old to a high of 90 hours for volunteers age 65 and over. The 20- to 24-year-old group showed the largest over-the-year change in median hours volunteered, decreasing by 8 hours to a median of 40 hours. This followed an increase of 7 hours for this group in 2008." (table 2)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Volunteering in the United States, 2009. Retrieved January 26, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten (57%) Millennials say that they had volunteered in the past 12 months, which is no higher than the proportion of Gen Xers (54%) who said they had done this. About half of Baby Boomers (52%) and just 39% of those in the Silent generation...

According to a 2010 Pew Research Center survey, "nearly six-in-ten (57%) Millennials say that they had volunteered in the past 12 months, which is no higher than the proportion of Gen Xers (54%) who said they had done this. About half of Baby Boomers (52%) and just 39% of those in the Silent generation say they volunteered in the past year. (p. 83)

Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials: A portrait of generation next: Confident. connected. open to change. Washington, DC: The Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf

Findings in this study are mainly based on the results of a telephone survey conducted Jan. 14 to 27, 2010, on landlines and cell phones with a nationally representative sample of 2,020 adults. To allow for a detailed analysis of attitudes of the Millennial generation, the survey includes an oversample of respondents ages 18 to 29, for a total of 830 respondents in this age group.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "about 31% of all U.S. employees perform volunteer work or community service on a regular basis... Employees who do volunteer work spend 4.5 hours per week" on volunteer activities. (p. 43)

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "about 31% of all U.S. employees perform volunteer work or community service on a regular basis... Employees who do volunteer work spend 4.5 hours per week" on volunteer activities. (p. 43)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2009 BLS report, "about 61.8 million people, or 26.4 percent of the population, volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2007 and September 2008. Persons age 35 to 44 continued to be the most likely to volunteer (31.3 percent), while persons in their...

According to a 2009 BLS report, "about 61.8 million people, or 26.4 percent of the population, volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2007 and September 2008. Persons age 35 to 44 continued to be the most likely to volunteer (31.3 percent), while persons in their early twenties were the least likely (18.6 percent)." Among older adults, the rates declined from 29.9% for ages 45-54 to 28.1% for ages 55-64, and 23.5% for ages 65 and over. The volunteer rates of men and women were 23.2 percent, and 29.4 percent, respectively; women volunteered at a higher rate than did men across all age groups.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Volunteering in the United States, 2008. Retrieved January 26, 2009, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/volun.nr0.htm

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2008 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "according to a 2009 Pew survey, "women are somewhat more likely than men to say they expect to do volunteer work when they are older (83% of women vs. 77% of men)...men are more likely than women to predict that ...they will start a new job or second career (45% vs....

According to a 2009 Pew survey, "according to a 2009 Pew survey, "women are somewhat more likely than men to say they expect to do volunteer work when they are older (83% of women vs. 77% of men)...men are more likely than women to predict that ...they will start a new job or second career (45% vs. 32%)." (p. 30)

Taylor, P., Morin, R., Parker, K., & Wang, W. (2009). Growing old in America: Expectations vs. reality. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/getting-old-in-america.pdf

The Pew Social Trends Aging Survey obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,969 adults living in the continental United States. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from February 23 to March 23, 2009.

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, over 95 percent of adults in each of the four categories [male-female, married-unmarried] report doing some type of work, either paid work, volunteer work, or housework. (fig. 1, p. 2)

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, over 95 percent of adults in each of the four categories [male-female, married-unmarried] report doing some type of work, either paid work, volunteer work, or housework. (fig. 1, p. 2)

Havens, J. (2009). The working day: Understanding "work" across the life course (Issue Brief No. 21). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB21_WorkingDay_05-05.pdf

This brief examines the interaction of marital status and financial resources on the work participation of men and women across the life course. The findings are based on analysis of the 2003 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, "as they approach retirement age (roughly age 65), older adults tend to cut back on paid work and start increasing time for housework as well as volunteer activities. For instance, unmarried...

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, "as they approach retirement age (roughly age 65), older adults tend to cut back on paid work and start increasing time for housework as well as volunteer activities. For instance, unmarried men under age 50 spend 45 hours per week working (of which 82 percent is paid work), while those ages 65 and older report 18 hours of work (of which only 45 percent is paid work)." (fig. 4a, p. 6)

Havens, J. (2009). The working day: Understanding "work" across the life course (Issue Brief No. 21). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB21_WorkingDay_05-05.pdf

This brief examines the interaction of marital status and financial resources on the work participation of men and women across the life course. The findings are based on analysis of the 2003 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, "as they approach retirement age (roughly age 65), older adults tend to cut back on paid work and start increasing time for housework as well as volunteer activities." For instance, married men...

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, "as they approach retirement age (roughly age 65), older adults tend to cut back on paid work and start increasing time for housework as well as volunteer activities." For instance, married men under age 50 spend 42 hours per week doing paid work; those aged 50-64 do 36 hours per week paid work, while those ages 65 and older report 8 hours of work (fig. 4b, p. 6)

Havens, J. (2009). The working day: Understanding "work" across the life course (Issue Brief No. 21). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB21_WorkingDay_05-05.pdf

This brief examines the interaction of marital status and financial resources on the work participation of men and women across the life course. The findings are based on analysis of the 2003 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, unmarried women under age 50 spend 32 hours per week on paid work, while unmarried women aged 50-64 30 spend 30 hours on paid work, and those ages 65 and older report 3 hours of paid work. (fig....

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, unmarried women under age 50 spend 32 hours per week on paid work, while unmarried women aged 50-64 30 spend 30 hours on paid work, and those ages 65 and older report 3 hours of paid work. (fig. 4c, p. 6)

Havens, J. (2009). The working day: Understanding "work" across the life course (Issue Brief No. 21). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB21_WorkingDay_05-05.pdf

This brief examines the interaction of marital status and financial resources on the work participation of men and women across the life course. The findings are based on analysis of the 2003 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, married women under age 50 spend 26 hours per week on paid work, the same rate as those aged 50-64. Married women aged 65 and older report 7 hours of paid work. (fig. 4d, p. 6)

According to a 2009 Sloan Center on Aging and Work analysis of data from the Panel Study on Income Dynamics, married women under age 50 spend 26 hours per week on paid work, the same rate as those aged 50-64. Married women aged 65 and older report 7 hours of paid work. (fig. 4d, p. 6)

Havens, J. (2009). The working day: Understanding "work" across the life course (Issue Brief No. 21). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB21_WorkingDay_05-05.pdf

This brief examines the interaction of marital status and financial resources on the work participation of men and women across the life course. The findings are based on analysis of the 2003 wave of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

According to a 2009 survey by The Hartford, "frequency of volunteer work does not vary widely by age. Among respondents under age 50, 45.4% do not participate in volunteer work, compared to 47.9% of those over age 50. Those under age 50 are somewhat more likely to volunteer less than 1 day per month...

According to a 2009 survey by The Hartford, "frequency of volunteer work does not vary widely by age. Among respondents under age 50, 45.4% do not participate in volunteer work, compared to 47.9% of those over age 50. Those under age 50 are somewhat more likely to volunteer less than 1 day per month (20.8%) compared to those over age 50 (12.4%). Less than 10% of respondents in both age groups volunteer one day per month or more." (p. 10)

The Hartford. (2009). Cause support June 10, 2009 omnibus [voluntarism and charitable gift survey]. Hartford, CT: The Hartford.

an online survey among the TNS Omnibus panel of 1000 consumers (of all ages) was conducted. The study was fielded on June 10, 2009.

According to a 2009 survey by The Hartford, "respondents aged 50 or older are more likely to participate in volunteer work, with 52.9% of respondents reporting such activities, compared to 45.2% of those under age 50."  Those aged 50 or older are also more likely to "provide monetary donations...

According to a 2009 survey by The Hartford, "respondents aged 50 or older are more likely to participate in volunteer work, with 52.9% of respondents reporting such activities, compared to 45.2% of those under age 50."  Those aged 50 or older are also more likely to "provide monetary donations to causes they support, with 76.5% reporting such donations, compared to 60.8% of those under age 50." (p. 7)

The Hartford. (2009). Cause support June 10, 2009 omnibus [voluntarism and charitable gift survey]. Hartford, CT: The Hartford.

An online survey among the TNS Omnibus panel of 1000 consumers (of all ages) was conducted. The study was fielded on June 10, 2009.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study, "among adults aged 55-65, 40.3% did not volunteer in any of the survey periods [1996-2004]; 15.2% volunteered in only one period; 28.8% volunteered in two, three, or four survey periods; and 15.7% volunteered in all five periods...Nearly...

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study, "among adults aged 55-65, 40.3% did not volunteer in any of the survey periods [1996-2004]; 15.2% volunteered in only one period; 28.8% volunteered in two, three, or four survey periods; and 15.7% volunteered in all five periods...Nearly 4 in 10 adults aged 55-65 who volunteered in 1996 volunteered in all four subsequent periods, and another 2 in 10 volunteered in three of the four subsequent periods. (p. 648)

Butrica, B. A., Johnson, R. W., & Zedlewski, S. R. (2009). Volunteer dynamics of older Americans. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 64B(5), 644-655.

Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, the analysis examined entries into and exits from formal volunteer activities between 1996 and 2004 by adults aged 55-65 at study baseline. 5,872 individuals who completed all fi ve HRS interviews from 1996 to 2004.

According to a 2007 analysis from the Center on Aging and Work, the number of hours spent on volunteer activities increases with age. On average, approximately 29% of all civilian adults volunteered from September 2004 to September 2005 (with an average of 126 total volunteer hours), of those, 30.7%...

According to a 2007 analysis from the Center on Aging and Work, the number of hours spent on volunteer activities increases with age. On average, approximately 29% of all civilian adults volunteered from September 2004 to September 2005 (with an average of 126 total volunteer hours), of those, 30.7% were 50-64 years old (with an average of 136.5 total hours), and 24.8% were 65+ years old (with an average total of 175 hours) (fig. 5, p. 4)


Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

Analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that "among older workers, the odds of being very satisfied with life are 63.6% higher for females than for males; 45.3% lower for white non-Hispanics than for people of other ethnic/racial backgrounds, and 8.5% higher with...

Analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that "among older workers, the odds of being very satisfied with life are 63.6% higher for females than for males; 45.3% lower for white non-Hispanics than for people of other ethnic/racial backgrounds, and 8.5% higher with every additional year in age." (p. 6)

Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

According to a 2008 analysis of time-use data, "at low levels of volunteering, working part time or having access to a part-time schedule usually was associated with more time spent volunteering. However, at high levels of volunteering, the effect diminishes. Full-time workers who were very involved...

According to a 2008 analysis of time-use data, "at low levels of volunteering, working part time or having access to a part-time schedule usually was associated with more time spent volunteering. However, at high levels of volunteering, the effect diminishes. Full-time workers who were very involved with volunteering were just as likely (or in extreme cases, more likely) to remain involved in the future in comparison to part time workers. (p. 7, and fig. 6, p. 7)

McNamara, T. K. (2008). Time use across the life course (Issue Brief No. 18). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB18_TimeUse_2008-11-20.pdf

This Issue Brief utilizes time use data to outline the variation in the "typical" day over the life course, paying special attention to the role of work and job-related characteristics.

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "the volunteer rate among Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) decreased about half a percentage point, to 29.9 percent, between 2006 and 2007. The Midwest has the highest volunteer rate for Baby Boomers at 36.9 percent."

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "the volunteer rate among Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) decreased about half a percentage point, to 29.9 percent, between 2006 and 2007. The Midwest has the highest volunteer rate for Baby Boomers at 36.9 percent."

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2008). Volunteering in America: Research highlights. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/VIA_Brief_FINAL.pdf

The data used in this report were collected through supplements to the September Current Population Survey (CPS) in 1974, 1989, and 2002-2007. Today the CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households (approximately 100,000 adults), conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The purpose of the September supplement is to obtain information on the incidence of volunteering, the characteristics of volunteers, and civic life indicators in the United States.

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "boomers are most likely to continue volunteering if the activity that they perform is professional or managerial (74.8% retention). They are least likely to continue serving if their activity is primarily to engage in general labor or supply transportation...

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "boomers are most likely to continue volunteering if the activity that they perform is professional or managerial (74.8% retention). They are least likely to continue serving if their activity is primarily to engage in general labor or supply transportation (55.6% retention)."

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2008). Volunteering in America: Research highlights. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/VIA_Brief_FINAL.pdf

The data used in this report were collected through supplements to the September Current Population Survey (CPS) in 1974, 1989, and 2002-2007. Today the CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households (approximately 100,000 adults), conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The purpose of the September supplement is to obtain information on the incidence of volunteering, the characteristics of volunteers, and civic life indicators in the United States.

According to a 2008 AARP survey, "four in ten Americans aged 44-79 (41%) indicate they are very or somewhat likely to increase the amount of time they spend volunteering in the next five years." (p. 4)

According to a 2008 AARP survey, "four in ten Americans aged 44-79 (41%) indicate they are very or somewhat likely to increase the amount of time they spend volunteering in the next five years." (p. 4)

Bridgeland, J. M., Putnam, R. D., & Wofford, H. L. (2008). More to give: Tapping the talents of the baby boomer, silent and greatest generations. Washington, DC: AARP; Civic Enterprises LLC. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/moretogive.pdf

A national survey was condected by telephone among a total of 1,012 adult between the ages of 44 and 79 from June 6 to 11, 2008.

According to a 2008 AARP survey, "seventy-one percent of respondents said they prefer volunteering without a specific schedule, while 21 percent said they prefer regular and ongoing opportunities." (p. 19)

According to a 2008 AARP survey, "seventy-one percent of respondents said they prefer volunteering without a specific schedule, while 21 percent said they prefer regular and ongoing opportunities." (p. 19)

Bridgeland, J. M., Putnam, R. D., & Wofford, H. L. (2008). More to give: Tapping the talents of the baby boomer, silent and greatest generations. Washington, DC: AARP; Civic Enterprises LLC. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/moretogive.pdf

A national survey was condected by telephone among a total of 1,012 adults between the ages of 44 and 79 from June 6 to 11, 2008.

According to a 2005 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2005, 26.9  million adults (11.9%) volunteered at a religious organization, while 46.9 million adults (20.7%) volunteered for one or more secular organizations.  Among adults age 50 throught 64, 7.2 million (14.2%) donated...

According to a 2005 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2005, 26.9  million adults (11.9%) volunteered at a religious organization, while 46.9 million adults (20.7%) volunteered for one or more secular organizations.  Among adults age 50 throught 64, 7.2 million (14.2%) donated time to religion, and 10.6 million (21%) contributed their time to one or more secular casues during the same period.  4.6 million adults ages 65 and older (13.2%) volunteered to religion and 6.4 million (15.4%) volunteered to at least one secular cause." (p.3)


Havens, J., & McNamara, T. K. (2007). Civic engagement: Volunteering dynamics and flexible work options (Issue Brief No. 07). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 30, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB07_VolunteeringDynamics_000.pdf

"This Issue Brief both describes volunteering behavior among older adults, compared to volunteering behavior among the adult population as a whole, and considers the possibilities for workplace policies to encourage or discourage volunteering in this subset of the population."

A 2007 McKinsey survey found that "two-thirds of boomers over age 50 view retirement as a time to contribute to society. Today 90 percent of the people in Habitat for Humanity's database of active volunteers are in their late 50s or early 60s."

A 2007 McKinsey survey found that "two-thirds of boomers over age 50 view retirement as a time to contribute to society. Today 90 percent of the people in Habitat for Humanity's database of active volunteers are in their late 50s or early 60s."

Court, D., Farrell, D., & Forsyth, J. E. (2007). Serving aging baby boomers. McKinsey Quarterly, 104(4), 102-113.

McKinsey researchers surveyed 5,100 older boomers and younger members of the silent generation and conducted 32 in-home interviews that involved observing the environments of the interviewees and listening to their verbal narratives.

According to a 2007 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "religious volunteers donated an average of 3.3 full time weeks per volunteer; secular volunteers donated an average of 3.1 full time weeks per volunteer to secular causes. Volunteers age 50 through 64 contributed an average of 126 annual...

According to a 2007 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "religious volunteers donated an average of 3.3 full time weeks per volunteer; secular volunteers donated an average of 3.1 full time weeks per volunteer to secular causes. Volunteers age 50 through 64 contributed an average of 126 annual hours (3.6 full time weeks) per volunteer to religion and 113 annual hours (3.2 full time weeks) to secular organizations. Volunteers age 65 and older donated an average of 134 annual hours (3.8 full time weeks) per volunteer to religion and 167 annual hours (4.8 full time weeks) per volunteer to secular groups." (fig. 1, p. 4)


Havens, J., & McNamara, T. K. (2007). Civic engagement: Volunteering dynamics and flexible work options (Issue Brief No. 07). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB07_VolunteeringDynamics_000.pdf

"This Brief both describes volunteering behavior among older adults, compared to volunteering behavior among the adult population as a whole, and considers the possibilities for workplace policies to encourage or discourage volunteering in this subset of the population." (p. 1)

A 2007 analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows that "volunteer tasks vary by age groups. Some tasks, such as mentoring youth or tutoring, peak in the twenties or early thirties, then decline among other age groups. Other tasks, such as coaching sports, peak in middle age. Volunteering time...

A 2007 analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows that "volunteer tasks vary by age groups. Some tasks, such as mentoring youth or tutoring, peak in the twenties or early thirties, then decline among other age groups. Other tasks, such as coaching sports, peak in middle age. Volunteering time to managerial or professional tasks tends to peak in the early retiree years (55 to 64), while tasks such as collecting food or providing general office assistance continue to increase with age." (fig. 2, p. 5)


Havens, J., & McNamara, T. K. (2007). Civic engagement: Volunteering dynamics and flexible work options (Issue Brief No. 07). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB07_VolunteeringDynamics_000.pdf

"This Brief both describes volunteering behavior among older adults, compared to volunteering behavior among the adult population as a whole, and considers the possibilities for workplace policies to encourage or discourage volunteering in this subset of the population." (p. 1)

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement study, more than 10 million healthy older adults without caregiving responsibilities do not engage in paid work or formal volunteering. More than half of these able adults are under age 75, and more than 9 out of 10 have some paid work...

According to a 2007 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement study, more than 10 million healthy older adults without caregiving responsibilities do not engage in paid work or formal volunteering. More than half of these able adults are under age 75, and more than 9 out of 10 have some paid work experience. (p. 6)

Zedlewski, S. R., & Butrica, B. A. (2007). Are we taking full advantage of older adults' potential? Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/411581_adult_potential.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the 2004 Health and Retirement Study, and estimates the potential for increasing engagement among adults 55 and older. Engagement is defined as working for pay or volunteering for an organization.

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 34.2% of those ages 35-49, 30.7% of those aged 50-64, and 24.8% of those 65 and older volunteered for an organization (Havens, 2005: Table 1).

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 34.2% of those ages 35-49, 30.7% of those aged 50-64, and 24.8% of those 65 and older volunteered for an organization (Havens, 2005: Table 1).

Havens, J. (2006). [Analysis of data from the Current Population Study, September 2005]. Unpublished raw data.

"The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly study of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey has been conducted for more than 50 years. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. Respondents are interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household 15 years of age and older. However, published data focus on those ages 16 and over. The sample provides estimates for the nation as a whole and serves as part of model-based estimates for individual states and other geographic areas. Estimates obtained from the CPS include employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators...They are available by a variety of demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, marital status, and educational attainment...occupation, industry, and class of worker."

A 2006 analysis of CPS data, the Corporation for National and Community Service found that volunteer rates vary by state, with a minimum 3-year average of 13.7% and a maximum of 51.8%. (p. 29)

A 2006 analysis of CPS data, the Corporation for National and Community Service found that volunteer rates vary by state, with a minimum 3-year average of 13.7% and a maximum of 51.8%. (p. 29)


Corporation for National and Community Service. (2006, June). Volunteering in America: State Trends and Rankings. Washington, DC.

Using the 2002 to 2005 Current Population Study volunteering data, this study presents "volunteer rates according to demographic characteristics, the distribution of hours volunteered, the types of main organizations at which volunteer activities were performed, and the most common activities performed by volunteers." (p.10)

A 2006 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study shows that employees, ages 50 to 70, who were able to reduce their hours on the job in 2002 reported an average increase of 6 annual hours volunteered in the time period from 2002 to 2004 (McNamara, 2006).

A 2006 analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study shows that employees, ages 50 to 70, who were able to reduce their hours on the job in 2002 reported an average increase of 6 annual hours volunteered in the time period from 2002 to 2004 (McNamara, 2006).


McNamara, T.K. (2006). [Analysis of data from the Health and Retirement Study, 2002-2004]. Unpublished raw data.

The Health and Retirement Study is a nationally representative study of adults age 50 and older in the United States. This analysis uses the 2002 and 2004 data.

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "while the overall adult volunteer rate declined substantially from 1974 to 1989, the volunteer rate for adults 65 years old and over actually increased during that period (14.3% in 1974 to 16.9% in 1989). In fact, older adult volunteering...

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "while the overall adult volunteer rate declined substantially from 1974 to 1989, the volunteer rate for adults 65 years old and over actually increased during that period (14.3% in 1974 to 16.9% in 1989). In fact, older adult volunteering has been on an upwardtrajectory through the last three decades, going from 14.3 percent in 1974 to 23.5 percent in 2005." (p. 3)

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2006). Volunteer growth in America: A review of trends since 1974. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/06_1203_volunteer_growth.pdf

To enable comparisons across the 1974, 1989, and 2005 Current Population Surveys (CPS) administered by the U.S. Census Bureau, a consistent definition of an “adult volunteer” has been used. For all three survey periods, an adult volunteer is someone age 16 and older who did work through an organization in the previous 12 months for which they were not paid.

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, there was a 37 percent increase in volunteering among mid-life Americans since 1989 (from 23.2% in 1974 and 22% in 1989 to 30% in 2005)." Baby boomers made up 75% of the increase. (p. 2)

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, there was a 37 percent increase in volunteering among mid-life Americans since 1989 (from 23.2% in 1974 and 22% in 1989 to 30% in 2005)." Baby boomers made up 75% of the increase. (p. 2)

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2006). Volunteer growth in America: A review of trends since 1974. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/06_1203_volunteer_growth.pdf

To enable comparisons across the 1974, 1989, and 2005 Current Population Surveys (CPS) administered by the U.S. Census Bureau, a consistent definition of an 'adult volunteer' has been used. For all three survey periods, an adult volunteer is someone age 16 and older who did work through an organization in the previous 12 months for which they were not paid.

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "the adult volunteer rate declined by 15 percent between 1974 and 1989 (23.6% to 20.4%, respectively) but rebounded to a new high today (27%). In fact, the adult volunteering rate increased by more than 32 percent since 1989." (fig 1, p....

According to a 2006 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "the adult volunteer rate declined by 15 percent between 1974 and 1989 (23.6% to 20.4%, respectively) but rebounded to a new high today (27%). In fact, the adult volunteering rate increased by more than 32 percent since 1989." (fig 1, p. 2)

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2006). Volunteer growth in America: A review of trends since 1974. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/06_1203_volunteer_growth.pdf

To enable comparisons across the 1974, 1989, and 2005 Current Population Surveys (CPS) administered by the U.S. Census Bureau, a consistent definition of an 'adult volunteer' has been used. For all three survey periods, an adult volunteer is someone age 16 and older who did work through an organization in the previous 12 months for which they were not paid.

A 2005 report indicates that "almost two out of five caregivers - 38 percent - volunteer at a hospital, school, church, or other organization in their community. In comparison, 30 percent of adult children not providing care to a parent engage in some form of volunteer work."(p.6)

A 2005 report indicates that "almost two out of five caregivers - 38 percent - volunteer at a hospital, school, church, or other organization in their community. In comparison, 30 percent of adult children not providing care to a parent engage in some form of volunteer work."(p.6)

Center on an Aging Society. (2005, May). Adult children. The likelihood of providing care for an older parent. (Data Profile No. 2). Washington, DC: Center on an Aging Society. Retrieved August 21, 2005, from http://hpi.georgetown.edu/agingsociety/pubhtml/caregiver2/caregiver2.html

"This Profile provides an overview of adult children who are primary caregivers to an older parent that needs assistance performing one or more basic everyday activities…Furthermore, this Profile examines adult children that have living parents but are not primary caregivers as well as adults without any living parents. Adult children, non-caregivers and adults without living parents could be caregivers in another capacity, such as a secondary caregiver or a caregiver to a spouse or sibling."

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 30.2% of those aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization. (Table 1) *Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 30.2% of those aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization. (Table 1)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 27.3% of men aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization, while 32.8% of women aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization. (Table 1) *Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 27.3% of men aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization, while 32.8% of women aged 55 to 64 volunteered for an organization. (Table 1)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 24.8% of those aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization. (Table 1) *Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 24.8% of those aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization. (Table 1)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/volunteer_study_05.pdf

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 23.1% of men aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization, while 26.0% of women aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization. (Table 1) *Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 23.1% of men aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization, while 26.0% of women aged 65 and older volunteered for an organization. (Table 1)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/volunteer_study_05.pdf

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 19.0% of those aged 55 to 64 volunteered between 1-14 hours, 23.3% volunteered between 15-49 hours, 14.8% volunteered between 50-99 hours, 30.1% volunteered 100-499 hours, 6.6% volunteered over 500 hours, and 6.3% did not report their...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 19.0% of those aged 55 to 64 volunteered between 1-14 hours, 23.3% volunteered between 15-49 hours, 14.8% volunteered between 50-99 hours, 30.1% volunteered 100-499 hours, 6.6% volunteered over 500 hours, and 6.3% did not report their annual hours. (Table 2)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 13.4% of volunteers aged 65 years and older volunteered between 1-14 hours, 19.8% volunteered between 15-49 hours, 13.8% volunteered between 50-99 hours, 37.0% volunteered between 100-499 hours, 8.6% volunteered over 500 hours, and 7.4%...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 13.4% of volunteers aged 65 years and older volunteered between 1-14 hours, 19.8% volunteered between 15-49 hours, 13.8% volunteered between 50-99 hours, 37.0% volunteered between 100-499 hours, 8.6% volunteered over 500 hours, and 7.4% did not report their annual hours. (Table 2)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/volunteer_study_05.pdf

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 67.5% of volunteers aged 55 to 64 volunteered for one organization, 18.8% volunteered for two organizations, 8.6% volunteered for three organizations, 2.9% volunteered for four organizations, 2.0% volunteered for five or more organizations,...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 67.5% of volunteers aged 55 to 64 volunteered for one organization, 18.8% volunteered for two organizations, 8.6% volunteered for three organizations, 2.9% volunteered for four organizations, 2.0% volunteered for five or more organizations, and 0.2% did not report the number of organizations for which they volunteered for. (Table 3)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 69.2% of volunteers aged 65 and older volunteered for one organization, 19.7% volunteered for two organizations, 6.8% volunteered for three organizations, 2.1% volunteered for four organizations, 1.7% volunteered for five or more organizations,...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 69.2% of volunteers aged 65 and older volunteered for one organization, 19.7% volunteered for two organizations, 6.8% volunteered for three organizations, 2.1% volunteered for four organizations, 1.7% volunteered for five or more organizations, and 0.5% did not report the number of organizations for which they volunteered for. (Table 3)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 8.0% of volunteers aged 55-64 volunteered for a civic, political, professional, or international organization, 13.5% volunteered for an educational or youth service organization, 2.1% volunteered for an environmental or animal care organization,...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 8.0% of volunteers aged 55-64 volunteered for a civic, political, professional, or international organization, 13.5% volunteered for an educational or youth service organization, 2.1% volunteered for an environmental or animal care organization, 8.9% volunteered for a hospital or other health organization, 1.4% volunteered for a public safety organization, 41.2% volunteered for a religious organization, 15.5% volunteered for a social or community service organization, 3.8% volunteered for a sport, hobby, cultural, or arts organization, and 4.0% volunteered for other organizations. 1.7% could not be determined. (Table 4)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 8.2% of volunteers aged 65 and older volunteered for a civic, political, professional, or international organization, 6.2% volunteered for an educational or youth service organization, 0.9% volunteered for an environmental or animal care...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 8.2% of volunteers aged 65 and older volunteered for a civic, political, professional, or international organization, 6.2% volunteered for an educational or youth service organization, 0.9% volunteered for an environmental or animal care organization, 10.1% volunteered for a hospital or other health organization, 0.8% volunteered for a public safety organization, 45.0% volunteered for a religious organization, 18.0% volunteered for a social or community service organization, 3.7% volunteered for a sport, hobby, cultural, or arts organization, and 4.7% volunteered for other organizations. 2.3% could not be determined. (Table 4)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 3.4% of volunteers aged 55-64 volunteered as a coach, referee, or supervised sports teams, 19.4% tutored or taught, 13.9% mentored youth, 17.1% were an usher, greeter, or minister, 28.5% collected, prepared, distributed, or served food,...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 3.4% of volunteers aged 55-64 volunteered as a coach, referee, or supervised sports teams, 19.4% tutored or taught, 13.9% mentored youth, 17.1% were an usher, greeter, or minister, 28.5% collected, prepared, distributed, or served food, 16.7% collected, made, or distributed clothing, crafts, or goods other than food, 30.1% fundraised or sold items to raise money, 8.7% provided counseling, medical care, fire/EMS, or protective services, 14.4% provided general office services, 23.8% provided professional or management assistance, 10.7% engaged in music, performance, or other artistic activities, 22.9% engaged in general labor, and 14.3% volunteered in other capacities. (Table 5)


*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.  Figure from
Havens, J., & McNamara, T. K. (2007). Civic engagement: Volunteering dynamics and flexible work options (Issue Brief No. 07). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 30, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB07_VolunteeringDynamics_000.pdf

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 40.6% of volunteers aged 55-64 directly approached the organization to volunteer, 42.4% of volunteers were asked by someone else, 14.5% became involved in other ways, and 2.6% did not report on how they became involved in their organization....

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 40.6% of volunteers aged 55-64 directly approached the organization to volunteer, 42.4% of volunteers were asked by someone else, 14.5% became involved in other ways, and 2.6% did not report on how they became involved in their organization. (Table 6)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 42.1% of volunteers aged 55-64 directly approached the organization to volunteer, 41.0% of volunteers were asked by someone else (1.6%), 14.2% became involved in other ways, and 2.7% did not report on how they became involved in their...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 42.1% of volunteers aged 55-64 directly approached the organization to volunteer, 41.0% of volunteers were asked by someone else (1.6%), 14.2% became involved in other ways, and 2.7% did not report on how they became involved in their organization. (Table 6)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), those aged 55-64 cited the following reasons for not volunteering: burnout (3.0%), family responsibilities or childcare problems (9.5%), health or medical problems (15.8%), lack of time (40.0%), were not asked (2.9%),  no longer a...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), those aged 55-64 cited the following reasons for not volunteering: burnout (3.0%), family responsibilities or childcare problems (9.5%), health or medical problems (15.8%), lack of time (40.0%), were not asked (2.9%),  no longer a member of the organization (2.3%), not interested in volunteering (5.5%), moved or lack of information, transportation, or expenses (3.3%), no longer required or relevant to current life situation (6.6%), or other reasons (9.6%). 1.5% did not report their reason for not volunteering. (Table 7)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), those aged 65 and older cited the following reasons for not volunteering: burnout (3.1%), family responsibilities or childcare problems (6.5%), health or medical problems (46.5%), lack of time (12.4%), were not asked (2.5%), no longer...

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), those aged 65 and older cited the following reasons for not volunteering: burnout (3.1%), family responsibilities or childcare problems (6.5%), health or medical problems (46.5%), lack of time (12.4%), were not asked (2.5%), no longer a member of the organization (1.3%), not interested in volunteering (5.4%), moved or lack of information, transportation, or expenses (3.1%), no longer required or relevant to current life situation (6.7%), or other reasons (11.5%). 1.1% did not report their reason for not volunteering. (Table 7)

*Note: Data on volunteers relate to persons who performed unpaid volunteer activities for an organization at any point from September 1, 2004, through the survey period in September 2005.

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 29.8% of full time workers volunteered, compared to 38.2% of part time workers, 26.4% of the unemployed, and 24.4% of those not in the labor force. (United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2005: Table 1)

According to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS), 29.8% of full time workers volunteered, compared to 38.2% of part time workers, 26.4% of the unemployed, and 24.4% of those not in the labor force. (United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2005: Table 1)

United States Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2005, September). Volunteering in the United States, 2005. Washington, DC.

These data on volunteering were collected through a supplement to the September 2005 Current Population Survey (CPS). Volunteers are defined as persons who did unpaid work (except for expenses) through or for an organization. The CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over." (p.1)

In a 2005 survey of employees and retirees from four selected firms, "almost three quarters (72%) of employees and retirees indicated Moderate to Very High Interest in pursuing volunteer activities through the workplace in retirement" (Center for Corporate Citizenship & Volunteers of America, 2005).

In a 2005 survey of employees and retirees from four selected firms, "almost three quarters (72%) of employees and retirees indicated Moderate to Very High Interest in pursuing volunteer activities through the workplace in retirement" (Center for Corporate Citizenship & Volunteers of America, 2005).

The Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College & Volunteers of America. (2005, June). Expanding the Boundaries of Corporate Volunteerism: Retirees as a Valuable Resource. Chestnut Hill, MA: Burnes, K., & Gonyea, J.G.

This report is based on data collected from three sources: "1) interviews with key corporate managers from a variety of sectors; 2) focus groups with employees and retirees; and 3) quantitative survey responses of employees and retirees." (p.4)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "About half (51%) the 45 and older population report volunteering when asked [whether]...they volunteer for a non-profit, charity, school, hospital, religious organization, neighborhood association, civic or other group...an additional 36% reported behaviors that were...

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "About half (51%) the 45 and older population report volunteering when asked [whether]...they volunteer for a non-profit, charity, school, hospital, religious organization, neighborhood association, civic or other group...an additional 36% reported behaviors that were not captured by the traditional volunteering question but could be considered to be in service to communities or persons." (AARP, 2003: 6).

AARP. (2003, October). 2003 Multicultural Study 2003: Time and Money: An In-Depth Look at 45+ Volunteers and Donors. Washington, DC.

AARP's 2003 multicultural project surveyed 2,069 Americans ages 45 and older by phone interview, aiming to "capture the several ways in which different race and ethnic groups give their time and money to the communities around them." (p.49)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "45 and older volunteers largely contribute their time sporadically--48% say they have no regular volunteer schedule, while 38% are regular volunteers, who pitch in each month." (AARP, 2003: 9)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "45 and older volunteers largely contribute their time sporadically--48% say they have no regular volunteer schedule, while 38% are regular volunteers, who pitch in each month." (AARP, 2003: 9)

AARP. (2003, October). 2003 Multicultural Study 2003: Time and Money: An In-Depth Look at 45+ Volunteers and Donors. Washington, DC.

AARP's 2003 multicultural project surveyed 2,069 Americans ages 45 and older by phone interview, aiming to "capture the several ways in which different race and ethnic groups give their time and money to the communities around them." (p.49)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "volunteers who are not employed average 19 hours per month compared to 12 hours by employed individuals, but the not employed are no more likely than the employed to be volunteers or to have regular volunteer commitments." (AARP, 2003: 9).

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that "volunteers who are not employed average 19 hours per month compared to 12 hours by employed individuals, but the not employed are no more likely than the employed to be volunteers or to have regular volunteer commitments." (AARP, 2003: 9).

AARP. (2003, October). 2003 Multicultural Study 2003: Time and Money: An In-Depth Look at 45+ Volunteers and Donors. Washington, DC.

AARP's 2003 multicultural project surveyed 2,069 Americans ages 45 and older by phone interview, aiming to "capture the several ways in which different race and ethnic groups give their time and money to the communities around them." (p.49)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that the most commonly given reasons for volunteering include: a personal responsibility to help others (65%), to make life more satisfying (58%), organizations has an established track record (51%), to help their own community (50%), to make a difference on an issue (49%),...

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that the most commonly given reasons for volunteering include: a personal responsibility to help others (65%), to make life more satisfying (58%), organizations has an established track record (51%), to help their own community (50%), to make a difference on an issue (49%), and to remain active (46%). (AARP, 2003: 28).


AARP. (2003, October). 2003 Multicultural Study 2003: Time and Money: An In-Depth Look at 45+ Volunteers and Donors. Washington, DC.

AARP's 2003 multicultural project surveyed 2,069 Americans ages 45 and older by phone interview, aiming to "capture the several ways in which different race and ethnic groups give their time and money to the communities around them." (p.49)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that 10% of adults over the age of 45 cited "employer encourages [them]" as a very important motivation for volunteering. (AARP, 2003: 28)

In a 2003 survey, AARP found that 10% of adults over the age of 45 cited "employer encourages [them]" as a very important motivation for volunteering. (AARP, 2003: 28)

AARP. (2003, October). 2003 Multicultural Study 2003: Time and Money: An In-Depth Look at 45+ Volunteers and Donors. Washington, DC.

AARP's 2003 multicultural project surveyed 2,069 Americans ages 45 and older by phone interview, aiming to "capture the several ways in which different race and ethnic groups give their time and money to the communities around them." (p.49)

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