Flexible Work Options: Remote Work

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According to the 2013 Work-Life Fit survey, "almost one-third (31%) of full-time workers in the U.S. do most of their work from a remote location, such as home, business center, or other location." (p. 1)

According to the 2013 Work-Life Fit survey, "almost one-third (31%) of full-time workers in the U.S. do most of their work from a remote location, such as home, business center, or other location." (p. 1)

Flex+Strategy Group / Work+Life Fit, Inc. (2014). It's 10 A.M. Do you know where and how your employees are working? Retrieved March 1, 2014, from http://www.worklifefit.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/WorkLifeFitReportFINALUPDATED--with%20Updated%20Hyperlink.pdf

In December 2013, the Flex+Strategy Group / Work+Life Fit, Inc. engaged ORC International to conduct a telephone survey of a national probability sample of 556 full-time U.S. employees with a +/- 4 percent margin of error.

According to the 2013 Work-Life Fit survey, there is "no significant difference in the age groups of remote workers." Among Gen Y workers (age 18-24), 35% report that they do most of their work remotely, compared to 30% of Gen X (30-49) workers and 30% of Boomers (age 50+).

According to the 2013 Work-Life Fit survey, there is "no significant difference in the age groups of remote workers." Among Gen Y workers (age 18-24), 35% report that they do most of their work remotely, compared to 30% of Gen X (30-49) workers and 30% of Boomers (age 50+).

Flex+Strategy Group / Work+Life Fit, Inc. (2014). It's 10 A.M. Do you know where and how your employees are working? Retrieved March 1, 2014, from http://www.worklifefit.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/WorkLifeFitReportFINALUPDATED--with%20Updated%20Hyperlink.pdf

In December 2013, the Flex+Strategy Group / Work+Life Fit, Inc. engaged ORC International to conduct a telephone survey of a national probability sample of 556 full-time U.S. employees with a +/- 4 percent margin of error.

According to the 2014 National Study of Employers, employers with 50 or more employees most frequently allow at least some groups of workers to have control over when they take breaks (92%), take time off for important family and personal needs without loss of pay (82%), and periodically change their...

According to the 2014 National Study of Employers, employers with 50 or more employees most frequently allow at least some groups of workers to have control over when they take breaks (92%), take time off for important family and personal needs without loss of pay (82%), and periodically change their starting and quitting times within some range of hours (81%)...and occasionally work some of their regular paid hours at home (67%)." (p. 5)

Matos, K., & Galinsky, E. (2014). 2014 National Study of Employers. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/2014-national-study-of-employers/

The 2014 NSE sample includes 1,051 employers with 50 or more employees— 67% are for-profit employers and 33% are nonprofit organizations; 39% operate at only one location, while 61% percent have operations at more than one location. Families and Work Institute (FWI) designed the questionnaire, and Harris Interactive, Inc. conducted the interviews on behalf of FWI.2 The results of the survey are being released with the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), which also consulted on the survey questions, as an integral part of the FWI-SHRM partnership and When Work Works initiative.

According to a 2014 survey of 556 full-time US employees, "among those who have any work life flexibility, the majority of flexibility in 2013 was informal and occasional (55%) such as occasional changes in schedule or your work location other than your employer's office, while the remainder (42%) had...

According to a 2014 survey of 556 full-time US employees, "among those who have any work life flexibility, the majority of flexibility in 2013 was informal and occasional (55%) such as occasional changes in schedule or your work location other than your employer's office, while the remainder (42%) had a formally agreed upon arrangement with their employer." (p. 2)

Flex+Strategy Group/Work Life Fit. (2014). Ambivalence is not a strategy: Employees sense waning commitment to work life flexibility. Madison, NJ: Flex+Strategy Group/Work Life Fit. Retrieved from http://www.worklifefit.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/WaningCommittmentReportFINAL.pdf

This report is based on a December 2013 ORC International telephone survey of a national probability sample of 556 full-time U.S. employees with a +/- 4 percent margin of error. The survey and research reports are the most recent installment in a biennial series of "reality checks" that have monitored the national progress of issues related to work life flexibility from the individual's point of view since 2006.

According to the 2014 SHRM Employee Benefits Report, "roughly three out of five (59%) organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 54% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 29% on a part-time basis, and 20% on a full-time basis."

According to the 2014 SHRM Employee Benefits Report, "roughly three out of five (59%) organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 54% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 29% on a part-time basis, and 20% on a full-time basis."

SHRM. (2014). 2014 employee benefits. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management. Retrieved from https://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Documents/14-0301%20Beneftis_Report_TEXT_FNL.pdf

A sample of HR professionals was randomly selected from SHRM's membership database, which included approximately 275,000 individual members at the time the survey was conducted. In February 2014, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 4,000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,867 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 510 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 13%.

According to a 2013 Gallup study, "despite working longer hours, working remotely seems to have a slightly positive effect on workers' employee engagement levels. [Remote] workers are slightly more engaged (32%) than employees who work on-site (28%). However, there is a point of diminishing returns...

According to a 2013 Gallup study, "despite working longer hours, working remotely seems to have a slightly positive effect on workers' employee engagement levels. [Remote] workers are slightly more engaged (32%) than employees who work on-site (28%). However, there is a point of diminishing returns for engaging remote workers. Those who spend less than 20% of their time working remotely are the most engaged, at 35%, and they have the lowest active disengagement, at 12%." (p. 29)

Gallup. (2013). State of the american workplace: Employee engagement insights for U.S. business leaders. Washington, DC: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/strategicconsulting/163007/state-american-workplace.aspx

The data in this report came from Gallup's Q12 Client Database, Gallup Panel studies, or Gallup Daily tracking. Some findings came from Gallup's 2012 meta-analysis.

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "between 2005 to 2012, employers have increased their provision of options that allow employees to better manage the times and places in which they work. These include flex time (from 66% to 77%); flex place (from 34% to 63%); choices in managing time...

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "between 2005 to 2012, employers have increased their provision of options that allow employees to better manage the times and places in which they work. These include flex time (from 66% to 77%); flex place (from 34% to 63%); choices in managing time (from 78% to 93%); and daily time off when important needs arise (from 77% to 87%)." (p. 6)

Matos, K., & Galinski, E. (2012). 2012 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Familes and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/NSE_2012.pdf

The 2012 NSE sample includes 1,126 employers with 50 or more employees--75% are for-profit employers and 25% are nonprofit organizations; 18% operate at only one location, while 82% percent have operations at more than one location. The results of the survey are being released with the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) as an integral part of the FWI-SHRM When Work Works initiative.

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed persons age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 11 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed persons age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 11 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). American Time Use Survey -- 2011 results. Retrieved June 25, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/atus_06222012.htm

The estimates in this release are based on annual average data from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). The ATUS, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is a continuous survey about how individuals age 15 and over spend their time.

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "self-employed workers were three times more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home on days worked--56 percent compared with 18 percent."

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "self-employed workers were three times more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home on days worked--56 percent compared with 18 percent."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). American Time Use Survey -- 2011 results. Retrieved June 25, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/atus_06222012.htm

The estimates in this release are based on annual average data from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). The ATUS, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is a continuous survey about how individuals age 15 and over spend their time.

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 21 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 85 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do some or all of their work...

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 21 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 85 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do some or all of their work at home.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). American Time Use Survey -- 2011 results. Retrieved June 25, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/atus_06222012.htm

The estimates in this release are based on annual average data from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). The ATUS, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is a continuous survey about how individuals age 15 and over spend their time.

According to a 2012 global workforce survey, "nearly half (47%) of our global sample work remotely or in some kind of flexible arrangement." (p. 6)

According to a 2012 global workforce survey, "nearly half (47%) of our global sample work remotely or in some kind of flexible arrangement." (p. 6)

Towers Watson. (2012). 2012 global workforce study. Engagement at risk: Driving strong performance in a volatile global environment. New York: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://towerswatson.com/assets/pdf/2012-Towers-Watson-Global-Workforce-Study.pdf

The Towers Watson Global Workforce Study covers more than 32,000 employees selected from research panels that represent the populations of full-time employees working in large and midsize organizations across a range of industries in 29 markets around the world. It was fielded by a third-party vendor via an online questionnaire between February and May 2012.

According to a 2012 analysis of two nationally-representative datasets, "among telecommuters, the average number of hours spent telecommuting each week is relatively modest, approximately 6 hours per week ... But fully 67 percent (i.e., 4.17/6.20) of telecommuting hours in one dataset [the NLSY] and...

According to a 2012 analysis of two nationally-representative datasets, "among telecommuters, the average number of hours spent telecommuting each week is relatively modest, approximately 6 hours per week ... But fully 67 percent (i.e., 4.17/6.20) of telecommuting hours in one dataset [the NLSY] and almost 50 percent (i.e., 3.21/6.75) in the other dataset [CPS] occur in the overtime portion of the weekly hours distribution." (p. 40)

Noonan, M. C., & Glass, J. L. (2012). The hard truth about telecommuting. Monthly Labor Review, 2012(6), 38-45. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2012/06/art3full.pdf

We use two nationally representative data sources, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) 1979 panel (hereafter, noted as the NLSY) and special supplements from the U.S. Census Current Population Survey (CPS),

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "in an average week in 2011, 7 percent of wage and salary workers adjusted their work schedules or location of their main jobs instead of taking time off from work."

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "in an average week in 2011, 7 percent of wage and salary workers adjusted their work schedules or location of their main jobs instead of taking time off from work."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Access to and use of leave--2011: Data from the American Time Use Survey. (Economic News Release No. USDL-12-1648). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/leave.nr0.htm

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "57% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 45% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 36% on a part-time basis and 20% on a full-time basis." (p. 43)

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "57% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 45% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 36% on a part-time basis and 20% on a full-time basis." (p. 43)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee benefits report: The employee benefits landscape in a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/research/surveyfindings/articles/documents/2012_empbenefits_report.pdf

In January 2012, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,500 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,200 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 550 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%.

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "three percent of organizations had a results-only work environment (ROWE), allowing employees to work wherever and whenever they wish as long as projects are completed on a timely basis." (p. 43)

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "three percent of organizations had a results-only work environment (ROWE), allowing employees to work wherever and whenever they wish as long as projects are completed on a timely basis." (p. 43)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee benefits report: The employee benefits landscape in a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/research/surveyfindings/articles/documents/2012_empbenefits_report.pdf

In January 2012, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,500 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,200 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 550 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%.

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "other types of flexible working benefits offered by organizations included seasonal scheduling (19%) and alternating location arrangements (5%), allowing employees to work part of the year in one location and the rest of the year in another location...

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "other types of flexible working benefits offered by organizations included seasonal scheduling (19%) and alternating location arrangements (5%), allowing employees to work part of the year in one location and the rest of the year in another location (e.g., snowbird employees--those who move from colder climates to warmer climates in the winter)." (p. 44)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee benefits report: The employee benefits landscape in a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/research/surveyfindings/articles/documents/2012_empbenefits_report.pdf

In January 2012, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,500 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,200 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 550 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%.

According to a 2012 anaylsis of US Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation, "the percentage of all workers who worked at least 1 day at home increased from 7.0 percent in 1997 to 9.5 percent in 2010... During this same time period, the population working exclusively from home increased...

According to a 2012 anaylsis of US Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation, "the percentage of all workers who worked at least 1 day at home increased from 7.0 percent in 1997 to 9.5 percent in 2010... During this same time period, the population working exclusively from home increased from 4.8 percent of all workers to 6.6 percent. The population working both at home and at another location increased from 2.2 percent to 2.8 percent of all workers." (p. 2)

Mateyka, P. J., Rapino, M. A., & Landivar , L. C. (2012). Home-based workers in the United States: 2010. (Current Population Reports No. P70-132). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-132.pdf

The data used in this report primarily come from two different surveys administered by the U.S. Census Bureau: the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

According to a 2012 analysis of US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, "the percentage of workers who worked the majority of the work week at home increased from 3.6 percent to 4.3 percent of the population between 2005 and 2010." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 analysis of US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, "the percentage of workers who worked the majority of the work week at home increased from 3.6 percent to 4.3 percent of the population between 2005 and 2010." (p. 2)

Mateyka, P. J., Rapino, M. A., & Landivar , L. C. (2012). Home-based workers in the United States: 2010. (Current Population Reports No. P70-132). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-132.pdf

The data used in this report primarily come from two different surveys administered by the U.S. Census Bureau: the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

According to a 2012 analysis of US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, "about 1 in 10 workers who worked exclusively from home were over the age of 65 in 2010." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 analysis of US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, "about 1 in 10 workers who worked exclusively from home were over the age of 65 in 2010." (p. 2)

Mateyka, P. J., Rapino, M. A., & Landivar , L. C. (2012). Home-based workers in the United States: 2010. (Current Population Reports No. P70-132). Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-132.pdf

The data used in this report primarily come from two different surveys administered by the U.S. Census Bureau: the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

According to a 2011 report on a survey of managers from over 500 different business organizations, "the most prevalent flexibility programs offered are part time schedules (with or without benefits), flex-time (flexible start/stop times) and telework on an ad-hoc basis (meet a repair person, sick child,...

According to a 2011 report on a survey of managers from over 500 different business organizations, "the most prevalent flexibility programs offered are part time schedules (with or without benefits), flex-time (flexible start/stop times) and telework on an ad-hoc basis (meet a repair person, sick child, etc.). These programs are each offered to some or all employees in more than 80% of companies, with more than two-thirds of organizations (68%) offering all three programs. (Fig.1, p. 5)

WorldatWork. (2011). Survey on workplace flexibility. Washington, DC: WorldatWork.Org. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=48160

On Oct. 20, 2010 survey invitations were e-mailed to 5,191 WorldatWork members with total rewards as their area of responsibility. The survey closed on Nov. 2, 2010, with 692 responses, a 13% response rate, yeilding 537 total usable responses. Respondents work at the managerial level or higher in the headquarters of companies in North America.

According to the 2011 SHRM employee benefits report, "other types of flexible working benefits offered by companies included seasonal scheduling (16%) and alternating location arrangements (5%), allowing employees to work part of the year in one location and the rest of the year in another location...

According to the 2011 SHRM employee benefits report, "other types of flexible working benefits offered by companies included seasonal scheduling (16%) and alternating location arrangements (5%), allowing employees to work part of the year in one location and the rest of the year in another location (e.g., snowbird employees--those who move from colder climates to warmer climates in the winter)." (p. 47)

SHRM. (2011). 2011 employee benefits research report: Examining employee benefits amidst uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/2011_Emp_Benefits_Report.pdf

A sample of HR professionals was randomly selected from SHRM's membership database, which included approximately 250,000 individual members at the time the survey was conducted. In February 2011, 600 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 18%.

According to the 2011 SHRM employee benefits report, "63% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 45% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 34% on a part-time basis and 20% on a full-time basis. "

According to the 2011 SHRM employee benefits report, "63% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 45% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 34% on a part-time basis and 20% on a full-time basis. "

SHRM. (2011). 2011 employee benefits research report: Examining employee benefits amidst uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/2011_Emp_Benefits_Report.pdf

A sample of HR professionals was randomly selected from SHRM's membership database, which included approximately 250,000 individual members at the time the survey was conducted. In February 2011, 600 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 18%.

According to a 2011 analylsis of data on telework, "forty-five percent of the US workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least part-time telework." (p. 4)

According to a 2011 analylsis of data on telework, "forty-five percent of the US workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least part-time telework." (p. 4)

Lister, K., & Harnish, T. (2011). The state of telework in the U.S: How individuals, business and government benefit. USA: Telework Research Network. Retrieved from http://www.workshifting.com/downloads/downloads/Telework-Trends-US.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from various sources including: The Census Bureau's American Community Survey, the BLS American Time Use Survey, WorldatWorks Telework 2011 and Workplace Flexibility Surveys, and other sources.

According to a 2011 study of working fathers, "more than three quarters of fathers reported using flex-time on either a formal or informal basis, 57% worked from home at least some part of their time, and 27% utilized compressed workweeks. Over 80% of those who worked from home or used flex-time did...

According to a 2011 study of working fathers, "more than three quarters of fathers reported using flex-time on either a formal or informal basis, 57% worked from home at least some part of their time, and 27% utilized compressed workweeks. Over 80% of those who worked from home or used flex-time did so on an informal basis." (p. 28-29)

Harrington, B., Van Deusen, F. R., & Humberd, B. K. (2011). The new dad: Caring, committed and conflicted. Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center for Work & Family. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/centers/cwf/pdf/FH-Study-Web-2.pdf

Findings are based on a national survey of 963 working fathers with at least one child age 18 or younger, who work for one of four Fortune 500 companies that agreed to administer the study within their organizations. The four companies are all large and have revenues ranging from $20-50 billion per year.60% of respondents were managers, 37% salaried professionals, and only 3% were paid hourly. All worked full-time.

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "self-employed workers were three times more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home on days worked in 2010 -- ”64 percent compared with 19 percent."

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "self-employed workers were three times more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home on days worked in 2010 -- ”64 percent compared with 19 percent."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Work at home and in the workplace, 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110624.htm

These data are from the American Time Use Survey, 2010 results, published in 2011 at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 10 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 10 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Work at home and in the workplace, 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110624.htm

These data are from the American Time Use Survey, 2010 results, published in 2011 at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 24 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 83 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do some or all of their...

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 24 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 83 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do some or all of their work at home in 2010 -- 22.9 percent of employed men compared with 24.5 percent of employed women."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Work at home and in the workplace, 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110624.htm

These data are from the American Time Use Survey, 2010 results, published in 2011 at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, 83% of employers offer ad hoc or occassional telework (e.g., to meet a repairman). (p. 4)

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, 83% of employers offer ad hoc or occassional telework (e.g., to meet a repairman). (p. 4)

WorldatWork. (2011). Telework 2011: A WorldatWork special report. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=53034

WorldatWork collected workplace flexibility survey data from 537 employers (members of WorldatWork) between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2, 2010. Employee data comes froma random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. adults ages 18 and older conducted between Dec. 9 and Dec. 30, 2010.

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, "the option to telework regularly on a monthly basis is offered more often to salaried employees (97% of employers offer this) than to hourly employees (offered by 11% of employers)." (p. 5)

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, "the option to telework regularly on a monthly basis is offered more often to salaried employees (97% of employers offer this) than to hourly employees (offered by 11% of employers)." (p. 5)

WorldatWork. (2011). Telework 2011: A WorldatWork special report. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=53034

WorldatWork collected workplace flexibility survey data from 537 employers (members of WorldatWork) between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2, 2010. Employee data comes froma random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. adults ages 18 and older conducted between Dec. 9 and Dec. 30, 2010.

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, in 2010, 56% of male respondants report that they are teleworkers, compared to 44% of women respondants. The majority of teleworkers, 51%, were aged 35-54, while 42% were 18-34, and 8% were aged 55+. Most teleworkers (69%) are college graduates, with 25% having...

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, in 2010, 56% of male respondants report that they are teleworkers, compared to 44% of women respondants. The majority of teleworkers, 51%, were aged 35-54, while 42% were 18-34, and 8% were aged 55+. Most teleworkers (69%) are college graduates, with 25% having a post-graduate degree. (Fig. 3, p. 6)

WorldatWork. (2011). Telework 2011: A WorldatWork special report. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=53034

WorldatWork collected workplace flexibility survey data from 537 employers (members of WorldatWork) between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2, 2010. Employee data comes froma random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. adults ages 18 and older conducted between Dec. 9 and Dec. 30, 2010.

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, "in 2010, 84% of teleworkers [that is, employees working remotely or from home once a month or more] did so one day per week or more, up from 72% in 2008." (p. 4)

According to a 2011 WorldatWork report, "in 2010, 84% of teleworkers [that is, employees working remotely or from home once a month or more] did so one day per week or more, up from 72% in 2008." (p. 4)

WorldatWork. (2011). Telework 2011: A WorldatWork special report. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=53034

WorldatWork collected workplace flexibility survey data from 537 employers (members of WorldatWork) between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2, 2010. Employee data comes froma random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. adults ages 18 and older conducted between Dec. 9 and Dec. 30, 2010.

According to a 2011 WorldatWork survey, "while 83% of employer respondents offered ad hoc teleworking, only 28% communicated the benefit to recruits." (p. 4)

According to a 2011 WorldatWork survey, "while 83% of employer respondents offered ad hoc teleworking, only 28% communicated the benefit to recruits." (p. 4)

WorldatWork. (2011). Telework 2011: A WorldatWork special report. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=53034

WorldatWork collected workplace flexibility survey data from 537 employers (members of WorldatWork) between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2, 2010. Employee data comes froma random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey of 1,002 U.S. adults ages 18 and older conducted between Dec. 9 and Dec. 30, 2010.

According to the 2011 Work+Life Fit survey of full-time employed adults, 35% of respondents plan to look for a new job either inside or outside of their organization. Among those who plan to look for a new job, 65% reported wanting a more flexible schedule (32%), the ability to telework (25%), or to...

According to the 2011 Work+Life Fit survey of full-time employed adults, 35% of respondents plan to look for a new job either inside or outside of their organization. Among those who plan to look for a new job, 65% reported wanting a more flexible schedule (32%), the ability to telework (25%), or to work a reduced schedule for less money (8%). (p. 4)

Work+Life Fit. (2011). 2011 Work+Life fit reality check summary. Madison, NJ: Work+Life Fit, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.worklifefit.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/wlf_2011realitycheck_summaryFINAL_0.pdf

The Work+Life Fit™ Reality Check is a biennial study that monitors the national progress of issues related to work life flexibility from the individual’s point of view. This telephone survey of a national probability sample of 637 full-time employed adults was sponsored by Work+Life Fit, Inc., conducted by Opinion Research Corporation on March 3-7, 2011, and has a margin of error of +/- 4 percent.

According to the 2011 Work+Life Fit Reality Check, 8 out of 10 full-time employees currently use some type of day-to-day or formal work-life flexibility. Among the specific types of work life flexibility, 62% report that they currently use "some type of day-to-day, ad-hoc flex," while 55% use "day-to-day...

According to the 2011 Work+Life Fit Reality Check, 8 out of 10 full-time employees currently use some type of day-to-day or formal work-life flexibility. Among the specific types of work life flexibility, 62% report that they currently use "some type of day-to-day, ad-hoc flex," while 55% use "day-to-day flex hours" and 46% use "formal flextime." Other types of flexibility used include "formal telework" (33%), "day-to-day telework" (34%), and "compressed work schedule" (27%). (p. 4)

Work+Life Fit. (2011). 2011 Work+Life fit reality check summary. Madison, NJ: Work+Life Fit, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.worklifefit.com/sites/default/files/pdfs/wlf_2011realitycheck_summaryFINAL_0.pdf

The Work+Life Fit Reality Check is a biennial study that monitors the national progress of issues related to work life flexibility from the individual's point of view. This telephone survey of a national probability sample of 637 full-time employed adults was sponsored by Work+Life Fit, Inc., conducted by Opinion Research Corporation on March 3-7, 2011, and has a margin of error of +/- 4 percent.

According to a 2010 Census Bureau report, among workforce participants who indicated that they were home based workers [that is, that they "usually" work at home] in 2005, "about 4 percent were age 15-24; nearly 18 percent were 25-34; 26 percent were 35-44; 26 percent were 45-54; 18 percent were 55-64...

According to a 2010 Census Bureau report, among workforce participants who indicated that they were home based workers [that is, that they "usually" work at home] in 2005, "about 4 percent were age 15-24; nearly 18 percent were 25-34; 26 percent were 35-44; 26 percent were 45-54; 18 percent were 55-64 and nearly 9 percent were 65 and older."

U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Census bureau reports home-based workers number 11 million in 2005. Retrieved February 3, 2010, from http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/employment_occupations/014553.html

These figures come from Home-Based Workers in the United States: 1999-2005, a series of tables that describe the type of employment, occupations and characteristics of home-based workers in the United States. The tables examine the total workforce and compare those who usually work at home with those who do not. "Usually" is defined to mean the most number of days during the week.

Acording to the 2010 BLS report on the American Time Use Survey, in 2009 "on the days that they worked, 24 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 84 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do...

Acording to the 2010 BLS report on the American Time Use Survey, in 2009 "on the days that they worked, 24 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 84 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace. Men and women were about equally likely to do some or all of their work at home. Self-employed workers were three times more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home on days worked--60 percent compared with 20 percent."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). American time use survey summary-- 2009 results. Retrieved June 22, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has released 2009 results from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). These data include the average amount of time per day in 2009 that individuals worked, did household activities, and engaged in leisure and sports activities.

According to a 2010 analysis of the Kelly Global Workforce Survey, "telecommuting or working from home is considered ‘extremely important’ by only 12 percent of respondents" worldwide.  However, in North America, 27 percent say that telecommuting or working from home would be ‘extremely important’...

According to a 2010 analysis of the Kelly Global Workforce Survey, "telecommuting or working from home is considered ‘extremely important’ by only 12 percent of respondents" worldwide.  However, in North America, 27 percent say that telecommuting or working from home would be ‘extremely important’ in attracting them to a job or keeping them in a job." (p. 2, 3)

Kelly Services. (2010). Employee loyalty rises during global economic recession, Kelly international workforce survey finds. Troy, MI: Kelly Services. Retrieved from http://www.easyir.com/easyir/kellyservices/CompanyLoyaltyGlobal_final_charts.pdf

The findings are part of the Kelly Global Workforce Index, which obtained the views of approximately 134,000 people in 29 countries across North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific. The survey, conducted from early October 2009 to the end of January 2010.

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey, "there were no significant changes in the flexible work benefits available to employees from 2009 to 2010." However, from 2006 to 2010, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of companies that offered flextime (57% in 2006 compared with...

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey, "there were no significant changes in the flexible work benefits available to employees from 2009 to 2010." However, from 2006 to 2010, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of companies that offered flextime (57% in 2006 compared with 49% in 2010). Telecommuting on a part-time basis was the only flexible working benefit offered by more organizations in 2010 than in 2006. (26% in 2006 compared with 34% in 2010). (p. 34 and Table G-2)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2010). 2010 employee benefits: Examining employee benefits in the midst of a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management. Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/10-0280%20Employee%20Benefits%20Survey%20Report-FNL.pdf

In February 2010, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted its annual
survey to gather information on the types of benefits employers offer to their employees. In
February 2010, an e-mail that included a hyperlink
to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,000
randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 2,850
e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents,
and 534 HR professionals responded, yielding a
response rate of 19%.

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey,"55% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 44% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 34% on a part time basis and 17% on a full-time basis." (p. 33-34)

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey,"55% of organizations offered some form of telecommuting: 44% of respondents reported that their organizations offered telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis, 34% on a part time basis and 17% on a full-time basis." (p. 33-34)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2010). 2010 employee benefits: Examining employee benefits in the midst of a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management. Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/10-0280%20Employee%20Benefits%20Survey%20Report-FNL.pdf

In February 2010, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted its annual survey to gather information on the types of benefits employers offer to their employees. In February 2010, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 2,850 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 534 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 19%.

According to a 2010 report from the Families and Work Institute, "50% of employers offer occasional flex place to some employees, but the number drops steeply for all or most employees, where 3% have this option...23% of employers allow some employees to work at home on a regular basis, with, not surprisingly,...

According to a 2010 report from the Families and Work Institute, "50% of employers offer occasional flex place to some employees, but the number drops steeply for all or most employees, where 3% have this option...23% of employers allow some employees to work at home on a regular basis, with, not surprisingly, only 1% offering this to all or most employees." (p. 5)

Galinsky, E., Sakai, K., & Wigton, T. (2010). Workplace flexibility among small employers. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/nscw08_workflex_DOL_101018.pdf

The findings in this report come from analysis of two comprehensive nationally representative studies of employers and employees conducted by Families and Work Institute: a study of employers--the 2008 National Study of Employers and a study of employees--the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, "higher-wage employees are much more likely (21%) than low-wage employees (4%) to be able to work some of their regular paid work hours at home." (p. 6)

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, "higher-wage employees are much more likely (21%) than low-wage employees (4%) to be able to work some of their regular paid work hours at home." (p. 6)

Bond, J. T., & Galinsky, E. (2010). Workplace flexibility and low-wage employees. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/WorkFlexAndLowWageEmployees.pdf

The research findings presented here are drawn from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW)i conducted by the Families and Work Institute. The survey sample is representative of the entire workforce in the United States. The report looks only at wage and salaried workers (N=2,769) who are employed by someone else.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "although only 3% of employees work mainly from home, about 16% of all employees are allowed to work some of their paid hours at home. Among employees who are allowed to work part of their regular paid hours...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "although only 3% of employees work mainly from home, about 16% of all employees are allowed to work some of their paid hours at home. Among employees who are allowed to work part of their regular paid hours at home, two thirds (65%) have done so. Among those who have not, but are allowed to work at home, slightly more than half (52%) want to work at home. Among employees who are not allowed to work part of their regular paid time at home (representing 84% of the workforce), just under half (49%) express a desire to do so. (p. 25)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, "the proportion of employees whose primary work location is a fixed location other than home was stable from 2002 to 2008 (82% versus 81%). The proportion of employees whose primary work location is home also was...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, "the proportion of employees whose primary work location is a fixed location other than home was stable from 2002 to 2008 (82% versus 81%). The proportion of employees whose primary work location is home also was stable from 2002 to 2008 (2% to 3%). While most wage and salaried employees still work at a fixed location away from home, almost 1 in 5 employees works at multiple locations including customer or client locations or on the road from vehicles, planes or hotel or motel rooms."(p. 24)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, 40.7% of employees reported that they are able to work in a remote work location (such as home). (fig. 4, p. 5)

In a 2009 study on access to flexible work options, 40.7% of employees reported that they are able to work in a remote work location (such as home). (fig. 4, p. 5)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & Besen, E. (2009). Workplace flexibility: Findings from the age and generations study (Issue Brief No. 19). Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB19_WorkFlex_2009-02-04.pdf

The Age & Generations Study team collaborated with 9 organizations (12 departments) to collect three types of data: information about the organization (as a whole) from a key respondent (typically someone from HR), information about a selected department(s) in each organization from a key respondent (typically the department manger), and information about employees from the department(s). In total, 2,210 employees from 12 departments participated in this study. (p. 17)

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, "the number of Americans who worked from home or remotely at least one day per month for their employer ("employee telecommuters") increased from approximately 12.4 million in 2006 to 17.2 million in 2008. The rise in the number of telecommuters represents a two-year...

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, "the number of Americans who worked from home or remotely at least one day per month for their employer ("employee telecommuters") increased from approximately 12.4 million in 2006 to 17.2 million in 2008. The rise in the number of telecommuters represents a two-year increase of 39 percent, and an increase of 74 percent since 2005." (p. 5)

WorldatWork. (2009). Telework trendlines 2009. Washington, DC: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.workingfromanywhere.org/news/Trendlines_2009.pdf

Between Nov. 6, 2008, and Dec. 2, 2008, a random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey was conducted by The Dieringer Research Group with funding from WorldatWork, the Total Rewards Association. Interviews with 1,002 U.S. adults 18 years and older were conducted using computergenerated random-digit telephone lists.

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, the percentage telecommuters that work remotely "almost every day" has dropped from 51% in 2006 to 40% in 2008. The percentage of telecommuters who indicate they work remotely at least one day per week has also dropped, but to a lesser extent (from 77% in 2006...

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, the percentage telecommuters that work remotely "almost every day" has dropped from 51% in 2006 to 40% in 2008. The percentage of telecommuters who indicate they work remotely at least one day per week has also dropped, but to a lesser extent (from 77% in 2006 to 72% in 2008). (fig. 2, p. 7)

WorldatWork. (2009). Telework trendlines 2009. Washington, DC: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.workingfromanywhere.org/news/Trendlines_2009.pdf

Between Nov. 6, 2008, and Dec. 2, 2008, a random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey was conducted by The Dieringer Research Group with funding from WorldatWork, the Total Rewards Association. Interviews with 1,002 U.S. adults 18 years and older were conducted using computergenerated random-digit telephone lists.

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, "38 percent of respondents who reported they were not currently telecommuting said they had job-related tasks that they thought they could perform from home. Conversely, 61 percent of those not currently telecommuting said they did not have job tasks that could...

According to a 2009 WorldatWork report, "38 percent of respondents who reported they were not currently telecommuting said they had job-related tasks that they thought they could perform from home. Conversely, 61 percent of those not currently telecommuting said they did not have job tasks that could be performed remotely." (p. 7)

WorldatWork. (2009). Telework trendlines 2009. Washington, DC: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.workingfromanywhere.org/news/Trendlines_2009.pdf

Between Nov. 6, 2008, and Dec. 2, 2008, a random-digit dialed (RDD) telephone survey was conducted by The Dieringer Research Group with funding from WorldatWork, the Total Rewards Association. Interviews with 1,002 U.S. adults 18 years and older were conducted using computergenerated random-digit telephone lists.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "about 12 percent of full-time workers with a single job did some work at home on an average day is 2003-2007." (p. 1)

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "about 12 percent of full-time workers with a single job did some work at home on an average day is 2003-2007." (p. 1)

Allard, M. D., & Lacey, J. (2009). Work-at-home patterns by occupation (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 09-02). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/pdf/opbils72.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the 2003-2007 American time use survey; data are averages for 2003-2007.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "self-employed workers were over three times more likely to do some work at home than wage and salary workers. About 34 percent of the self-employed did at least some work at home on an average day, compared with 10 percent of...

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "self-employed workers were over three times more likely to do some work at home than wage and salary workers. About 34 percent of the self-employed did at least some work at home on an average day, compared with 10 percent of wage and salary workers." (p. 1)

Allard, M. D., & Lacey, J. (2009). Work-at-home patterns by occupation (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 09-02). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/pdf/opbils72.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the 2003-2007 American time use survey; data are averages for 2003-2007.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "Self-employed workers spent a larger percent of their total weekly work hours at home than did wage and salary workers -- 24 percent compared with 4 percent." (p. 1)

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "Self-employed workers spent a larger percent of their total weekly work hours at home than did wage and salary workers -- 24 percent compared with 4 percent." (p. 1)

Allard, M. D., & Lacey, J. (2009). Work-at-home patterns by occupation (Issues in Labor Statistics Summary No. 09-02). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/pdf/opbils72.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the 2003-2007 American time use survey; data are averages for 2003-2007.

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "in 2007, about 1 in 3 of workers in management, professional and related occupations spent some time working at home on days they worked. In contrast, people employed in other occupations were less likely to work at home; in both...

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "in 2007, about 1 in 3 of workers in management, professional and related occupations spent some time working at home on days they worked. In contrast, people employed in other occupations were less likely to work at home; in both 2003 and 2007, about 12 percent of these workers worked at home on days they worked."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Working at home, 2003-2007, the editor's desk. Retrieved June 29, 2009, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2009/jun/wk4/art02.htm

This report is based on analysis of data from the 2003-2007 American time use survey; data are averages for 2003-2007.

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "69 percent of Ys and 63 percent of Boomers want to work remotely. In both generations, nearly half of those who want to work remotely only want to work from home one day a week (p. 44)

According to a 2009 study comparing GenY and Boomer employees, "69 percent of Ys and 63 percent of Boomers want to work remotely. In both generations, nearly half of those who want to work remotely only want to work from home one day a week (p. 44)

Hewlett, S. A., Jackson, M., Sherbin, L., Shiller, P., Sosnovich, E., & Sumberg, K. (2009). Bookend generations: Leveraging talent and finding common ground. New York: Center for Work-Life Policy.

The first U.S. survey was conducted online in June and July 2008 among 3,782 U.S. women and men between the ages of 21 and 62 and currently employed in certain white collar occupations, with at least a bachelor's degree; The second U.S. survey was conducted online in January and February 2009 and re-interviewed a total of 1,046 of the respondents from the first survey.

According to a 2009 WorldatWork survey of 135 employers, "39% said they do not put formal employer-employee agreements in place before allowing employees to pursue flexibility. 41% said they do not have an integrated strategy regarding employee flexibility. 44% reported they do not have a formal selection...

According to a 2009 WorldatWork survey of 135 employers, "39% said they do not put formal employer-employee agreements in place before allowing employees to pursue flexibility. 41% said they do not have an integrated strategy regarding employee flexibility. 44% reported they do not have a formal selection process in place to determine who should -- and perhaps who should not -- work remotely. 44% reported not having an evaluation process in place to assess technology effectiveness in these situations." (p. 5)

Grentham, C., & Ware, J. (2009). Flexible work arrangements for nonexempt employees. Scottsdale, AZ: WorldatWork. Retrieved from http://www.worldatwork.org/waw/adimLink?id=33623

Work Design Collaborative (WDC) conducted an online survey to generate original data for this project. A mailing to WDC's Future of Work community of 2,000 members resulted in a total of 135 completed online surveys (a response rate of 6.8%).

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "employed persons worked an average of 7.6 hours on the days that they worked... On the days that they worked, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 87 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace... Self-employed...

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "employed persons worked an average of 7.6 hours on the days that they worked... On the days that they worked, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home, and 87 percent did some or all of their work at their workplace... Self-employed workers were more likely than wage and salary workers to have done some work at home--55 versus 16 percent." (p. 1-2)

U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). American time use survey summary: 2007 results. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/atus.pdf

This annual release of American Time Use Survey (ATUS) data focuses on the average amount of time per day in 2007 that Americans worked, did house- hold activities, cared for household children, participated in educational activities, and engaged in leisure and sports activities.

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "just under two in five (38%) view the 'opportunity for part-time work' as essential in their ideal job, and one in three (34%) identify the 'ability to work from home' as essential." In comparison, 74% rated having a flexible schedule...

According to a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, "just under two in five (38%) view the 'opportunity for part-time work' as essential in their ideal job, and one in three (34%) identify the 'ability to work from home' as essential." In comparison, 74% rated having a flexible schedule as absolutely essential part of their ideal job. (p. 55)

Groeneman, S. (2008). Staying ahead of the curve 2007: The AARP work and career study. Washington, D.C.: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/work_career_08.pdf

Interviews were completed for a nationally representative sample of workers ages 45 to 74, including those who are currently employed and those who are unemployed but looking for work. 1500 telephone interviews were conducted from April 13 through May 21, 2007. Additional interviews were completed with African Americans and Hispanics.

In a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, 31% of men and 36% of women ranked the ability to work from home as an essential part of their ideal job. (Table 9, p. 54)

In a 2008 AARP survey of older workers, 31% of men and 36% of women ranked the ability to work from home as an essential part of their ideal job. (Table 9, p. 54)

Groeneman, S. (2008). Staying ahead of the curve 2007: The AARP work and career study. Washington, D.C.: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/work_career_08.pdf

Interviews were completed for a nationally representative sample of workers ages 45 to 74, including those who are currently employed and those who are unemployed but looking for work. 1500 telephone interviews were conducted from April 13 through May 21, 2007. Additional interviews were completed with African Americans and Hispanics.

In a 2008 MetLife/Civic Ventures survey, "nine in 10 nonprofit employers (90%) say that they offer part-time work, and 86 percent say they offer flexible schedules to all or some employees. But just 40 percent say they offer employees the flexibility to do work from a mobile office or at home." (p....

In a 2008 MetLife/Civic Ventures survey, "nine in 10 nonprofit employers (90%) say that they offer part-time work, and 86 percent say they offer flexible schedules to all or some employees. But just 40 percent say they offer employees the flexibility to do work from a mobile office or at home." (p. 9)

MetLife Foundation, & Civic Ventures. (2008). Tapping encore talent: A MetLife Foundation/Civic ventures survey of nonprofit employers. San Francisco, CA: Civic Ventures. Retrieved from http://www.civicventures.org/publications/surveys/employerssurvey08/employsurvey_fln_web_oct9.pdf

Hart Research Associates interviewed 427 nonprofit employers by telephone from March 27-April 18, 2008. All respondents worked for organizations with at least 15 employees, and half worked for organizations with more than 100 employees. (p. 33)

According to a 2007 survey of human resource professionals, working part (or all) of their regular workweek at home or at some other off site location is offered to "most/all" full-time employees at 12.3% of the organizations participating in the 2007 national study. (p. 16)

According to a 2007 survey of human resource professionals, working part (or all) of their regular workweek at home or at some other off site location is offered to "most/all" full-time employees at 12.3% of the organizations participating in the 2007 national study. (p. 16)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Smyer, M. A., Matz-Costa, C., & Kane, K. (2007). The national study report: Phase II of the national study of business strategy and workforce development (Research Highlight No. 04). Chestnut Hill, MA: The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved August 22, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH04_NationalStudy_03-07_004.pdf

The National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development is a 2007 study carried out by The Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility at Boston College. Human resource professionals at 578 non-governmental organizations with 50 or more employees completed a survey about their organization's response to the aging workforce. At these organizations, approximately three-fourths of the employees were full-time, almost half were women and one-third were members of a racial/ethnic minority group.

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "on the days that they worked in 2007, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home...35 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home compared with only 6 percent of those...

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "on the days that they worked in 2007, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home...35 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home compared with only 6 percent of those with less than a high school diploma. Multiple jobholders were much more likely to work at home than were single jobholders -- 31 versus 18 percent."

U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2007). Working at home in 2007, MLR: The editor's desk. Retrieved 7/7/2008 from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2008/jun/wk5/art03.htm 

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) provides nationally representative estimates of how, where, and with whom Americans spend their time, and is the only federal survey providing data on the full range of nonmarket activities, from childcare to volunteering.

According to a 2006 report from the Center on Aging & Work, "about one-third of employers make working at home available as an option for their employees."

According to a 2006 report from the Center on Aging & Work, "about one-third of employers make working at home available as an option for their employees."


Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2006). One size doesn't fit all: Workplace flexibility (Issue Brief No. 05). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 30, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB05_OneSizeDoesntFit_001.pdf

"This Issue Brief discusses opportunities to create flexible workplaces by restructuring jobs and redesigning work."

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 34% of employers allow some employees to work part of the work week at home occasionally, in comparison to 3% of employers that allow all or most employees to work part of the work week at home occasionally....

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 34% of employers allow some employees to work part of the work week at home occasionally, in comparison to 3% of employers that allow all or most employees to work part of the work week at home occasionally. (Table 3, p.6)

Families and Work Institute. (2005, September).2005 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Bond, T. J., Galinsky, E., Kim, S. S., & Brownfield, E. Retrieved August 02, 2006, from http://familiesandwork.org/press/2005nserelease.html#nse

“Families and Work Institute’s 2005 National Study of Employers (NSE) is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching study of the practices, policies, programs and benefits provided by U.S. employers to address the changing needs of today’s workforce and workplace…will provide ongoing measurements of employer work life benefits, policies, and practices. In 2005, it was redesigned to include a nationally representative sample of employers with 50 or more employers…The 2005 NSE sample included 1,092 employers with 50 or more employees-66 percent are for-profit companies and 34 percent are nonprofit organizations; 44 percent operate at only one location, while 56 percent have operations at more than one location.”

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 31% of employers allow some employees to work at home or off-site on a regular basis in comparison to 3% of employers that allow all or most employees to work at home or off-site on a regular basis....

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 31% of employers allow some employees to work at home or off-site on a regular basis in comparison to 3% of employers that allow all or most employees to work at home or off-site on a regular basis. (Table 3, p.6)

Families and Work Institute. (2005, September).2005 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Bond, T. J., Galinsky, E., Kim, S. S., & Brownfield, E. Retrieved August 02, 2006, from http://familiesandwork.org/press/2005nserelease.html#nse

“Families and Work Institute’s 2005 National Study of Employers (NSE) is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching study of the practices, policies, programs and benefits provided by U.S. employers to address the changing needs of today’s workforce and workplace…will provide ongoing measurements of employer work life benefits, policies, and practices. In 2005, it was redesigned to include a nationally representative sample of employers with 50 or more employers…The 2005 NSE sample included 1,092 employers with 50 or more employees-66 percent are for-profit companies and 34 percent are nonprofit organizations; 44 percent operate at only one location, while 56 percent have operations at more than one location.”

According to a 2002 survey conducted by The Conference Board, approximately one-third of older workers indicated that having access to a telework option would delay their transition into retirement,

According to a 2002 survey conducted by The Conference Board, approximately one-third of older workers indicated that having access to a telework option would delay their transition into retirement,

Parkinson, D. (2002).  Voices of experience: Mature workers in the future workforce. New York, NY: The Conference Board.

"Anticipating the impact of demographic trends on businesses, The Conference Board has been engaged in research examining the aging population, health care for retired employees, and the opportunities and constraints of employing older workers.  The Board convened the Engaging Mature Workers Working Group in September 2000 to address the challenge of maintaining a productive workforce in an aging society.  HR executives representing corporate staffing, benefits administration, and diversity management functions at 15 leading companies are lending their expertise to developing business strategies that maximize the talents of mature workers."

In a 2001 survey of employees in large US companies, 51% of employees work off-site on a regular basis. Of those, 67% are men and 33% are women. Among those who classify themselves as "regular" teleworkers (those who work from home one or more full days per week), 57% are men and 43% women. Of those...

In a 2001 survey of employees in large US companies, 51% of employees work off-site on a regular basis. Of those, 67% are men and 33% are women. Among those who classify themselves as "regular" teleworkers (those who work from home one or more full days per week), 57% are men and 43% women. Of those who report that they are "ad hoc" teleworkers (those who work from home at least one day per month), 64% are men and 36% women. (p. 79)

Richman, A. L., Noble, K., & Johnson, A. (2001). When the workplace is many places: The extent and nature of offsite work today. Watertown, MA: WFD Consulting.

A sample of 2057 adults were surveyed online. The Harris Poll Online database was used to select employees of for-profit companies of 500 or more employees.

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