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According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), among the oldest boomers, 52% are fully retired... 21% are working fulltime and just 12% are retired but working part-time or seasonally. Very few (2%) of the oldest Boomers are employed part-time. (p. 7)

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), among the oldest boomers, 52% are fully retired... 21% are working fulltime and just 12% are retired but working part-time or seasonally. Very few (2%) of the oldest Boomers are employed part-time. (p. 7)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "nearly a quarter of retired oldest Boomers left the workforce between the ages of 56 and 60. Nearly 20% retired at age 65. The average age of retirement is 59.5." (p. 8)

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "nearly a quarter of retired oldest Boomers left the workforce between the ages of 56 and 60. Nearly 20% retired at age 65. The average age of retirement is 59.5." (p. 8)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "when asked why retired oldest Boomers left the workforce, nearly four in 10 cited the fact that they reached retirement age and they just wanted to retire as the primary reason. Just 17% reported health as the main...

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "when asked why retired oldest Boomers left the workforce, nearly four in 10 cited the fact that they reached retirement age and they just wanted to retire as the primary reason. Just 17% reported health as the main incentive for retirement. Significantly more gave being laid off or unable to find work as the basis for their retirement in 2012 (10%) than in 2011 (6%)." (p. 9)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "of currently retired oldest Boomers, more than half (54%) left the workforce earlier than planned. Of those who retired earlier than expected, more did so for negative reasons than positive incentives. Health was the...

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "of currently retired oldest Boomers, more than half (54%) left the workforce earlier than planned. Of those who retired earlier than expected, more did so for negative reasons than positive incentives. Health was the biggest motivation (32%) and a quarter left the workforce early due to the loss of a job. Fewer than one in 10 retired early because they had adequate retirement resources or other reasons." (p.10)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetlLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "few reported actually retiring later than expected (8%). The primary push to work longer for those who retired later than planned was the need for the salary (30%). Yet just over a quarter (26%) did keep working because...

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "few reported actually retiring later than expected (8%). The primary push to work longer for those who retired later than planned was the need for the salary (30%). Yet just over a quarter (26%) did keep working because they enjoyed it and wanted to stay active." (p. 10)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "when asked about retirement income, more than half (58%) of currently retired oldest Boomers have found theirs to be less than before they stopped working. A quarter says their retirement income is about the same. Sixteen...

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "when asked about retirement income, more than half (58%) of currently retired oldest Boomers have found theirs to be less than before they stopped working. A quarter says their retirement income is about the same. Sixteen percent say their income has increased a little or a lot in retirement." (p. 11)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: MetLife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "nearly one-third (31%) of all older Boomers express high concern about providing for their own or spouse's/partner's long-term care needs -- the top retirement concern cited. More than a quarter (27%) are highly concerned...

According to a 2013 MetLife survey of the oldest baby boomers (those born in 1946), "nearly one-third (31%) of all older Boomers express high concern about providing for their own or spouse's/partner's long-term care needs -- the top retirement concern cited. More than a quarter (27%) are highly concerned about being able to afford health care in retirement, and nearly as many express this concern about having enough money to live comfortably, staying productive and outliving their retirement money." (p. 20)

Goyer, A. (2013). The MetLife report on the oldest boomers: Healthy, retiring rapidly and collecting social security. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-oldest-boomers.pdf

This survey was conducted for MetLife by GfK Custom Research between November-December 2012. A total of 1003 respondants were interviewed by phone -- all respondents were born in 1946.

According to a 2012 Metlife report on a survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost twice as many...stated that they were fully retired as were working full-time at age 65 (45% versus 24% respectively)." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 Metlife report on a survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost twice as many...stated that they were fully retired as were working full-time at age 65 (45% versus 24% respectively)." (p. 2)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, among those "who stated that they were fully retired, the average age at retirement for these Boomers was 59.7 for men and 57.2 for women." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, among those "who stated that they were fully retired, the average age at retirement for these Boomers was 59.7 for men and 57.2 for women." (p. 2)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those still working, over one-third anticipated that they will retire within the coming year, when they turn 66 and are eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those still working, over one-third anticipated that they will retire within the coming year, when they turn 66 and are eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits." (p. 2)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost one-half (45%) of 65-year-old Boomers are now fully retired (up from 19% in 2008), with another 14% reporting that they are retired but working part-time or seasonally." (p. 3)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost one-half (45%) of 65-year-old Boomers are now fully retired (up from 19% in 2008), with another 14% reporting that they are retired but working part-time or seasonally." (p. 3)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those who have not yet retired, 61% plan to retire at the same time as they planned one year ago. On average, Boomers who have not yet retired plan to do so by age 68.5." (p. 3)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those who have not yet retired, 61% plan to retire at the same time as they planned one year ago. On average, Boomers who have not yet retired plan to do so by age 68.5." (p. 3)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost four in 10 respondents (37%) who retired earlier than they had planned cite health-related reasons for doing so, while another 16% cite loss of a job or job opportunities. Those who retired later than they had planned...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost four in 10 respondents (37%) who retired earlier than they had planned cite health-related reasons for doing so, while another 16% cite loss of a job or job opportunities. Those who retired later than they had planned mention needing a salary to pay for day-to-day expenses (27%) and a desire to stay active (13%) as the reasons for delaying retirement." (p. 3)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "the majority of Boomers (63%) have ... started receiving Social Security benefits; of those, half started collecting before they had originally planned." (p. 3)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "the majority of Boomers (63%) have ... started receiving Social Security benefits; of those, half started collecting before they had originally planned." (p. 3)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, 85% reported excellent, very good, or good general health ratings. Almost two in 10 report being in worse health than they were in 2008. Of those, half have suffered a major health problem in the past three years." (p. 4)

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, 85% reported excellent, very good, or good general health ratings. Almost two in 10 report being in worse health than they were in 2008. Of those, half have suffered a major health problem in the past three years." (p. 4)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "among those currently working, just over half anticipate being able to retire before they turn 70 years old. In fact, 37% believe they will be able to retire within the next year (2012). On average, these respondents believe...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "among those currently working, just over half anticipate being able to retire before they turn 70 years old. In fact, 37% believe they will be able to retire within the next year (2012). On average, these respondents believe they will be able to retire by age 68.5. Between 2008 and 2011, the average planned retirement age among those still working increased by more than two years from 66.3 in 2008." (p. 6)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost half (46%) retired within the past few years, when they were age 62 or older. Just over a quarter (27%) retired between the ages of 56 and 61. Twenty percent retired at age 62. Just over a third (36%) of retirees...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "almost half (46%) retired within the past few years, when they were age 62 or older. Just over a quarter (27%) retired between the ages of 56 and 61. Twenty percent retired at age 62. Just over a third (36%) of retirees say the reason they retired was because they reached retirement age and wanted to. Another 18% cited health reasons." (p. 7)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, among those still working, 61% report that the age they plan to retire has not changed from that of their planned age one year ago... A third (32%), however, have changed their plans to a later date. This is primarily due...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, among those still working, 61% report that the age they plan to retire has not changed from that of their planned age one year ago... A third (32%), however, have changed their plans to a later date. This is primarily due to the need to continue receiving a salary to pay for day-to-day expenses, as reported by 27% of respondents. Another 24% report that they enjoy working or want to stay active. Of the few (7%) who now plan to retire earlier than they did one year ago, 23% attribute this to health reasons." (p. 7)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those who have already retired, half (51%) report they retired earlier than they had expected. Another 8% said they retired later than planned. The remaining retired as planned. More women than men reported an earlier...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "of those who have already retired, half (51%) report they retired earlier than they had expected. Another 8% said they retired later than planned. The remaining retired as planned. More women than men reported an earlier retirement (57% versus 43% respectively). The reason most retirees gave for why they decided to retire early was health-related (37%), followed by a loss of job (16%). Four in ten retirees said they retired early for 'other' reasons." (p. 8)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "while few (8%) retired later than planned, the main reason for this was the need for salary to pay for day-to-day expenses (27%), followed by the desire to remain active/enjoy working (13%), and the need to save more toward...

According to a 2012 survey of Baby Boomers born in 1946 who turned 65 in 2011, "while few (8%) retired later than planned, the main reason for this was the need for salary to pay for day-to-day expenses (27%), followed by the desire to remain active/enjoy working (13%), and the need to save more toward retirement (11%)." (p. 8)

MetLife. (2012). Transitioning into retirement: TheMetLife study of baby boomers at 65. Westport, CT: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2012/studies/mmi-transitioning-retirement.pdf

Transitioning into Retirement was conducted by GfK Custom Research North America on behalf of the MetLife Mature Market Institute from November 3, 2011 through November 30, 2011. A total of 1,012 respondents born in 1946 were surveyed by random digit-dial telephone contact. The recontacted sample was among 942 respondents from the previous wave of Boomer Bookends: Insights Into the Oldest and Youngest Boomers (2009) who agreed to be recontacted. A total of 450 respondents from this group completed the follow-up survey. The sample was supplemented by an additional sample of 562 respondents from Dunhill.

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, in the United States as a whole, "the age-45-and-above population increased by more than one-quarter while the under-45 population increased by a mere 1.4 percent. Most notable is the 50 percent growth of those aged 55-64, heralding the ascension of the early...

According to a 2011 analysis of Census data, in the United States as a whole, "the age-45-and-above population increased by more than one-quarter while the under-45 population increased by a mere 1.4 percent. Most notable is the 50 percent growth of those aged 55-64, heralding the ascension of the early baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1955) into older life stages." (p. 3)

Frey, W. H. (2011). The uneven aging and ‘younging’ of america: State and metropolitan trends in the 2010 census. Washington, DC: Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/rc/papers/2011/0628_census_frey/0628_census_aging_frey.pdf

Data for this study draw from U.S. decennial censuses of 1990, 2000, and 2010.

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "the baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) will start turning 65 in 2011, and the number of older people will increase dramatically during the 2010-2030 period. The older population in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as their counterparts...

According to the Older Americans 2010 report, "the baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) will start turning 65 in 2011, and the number of older people will increase dramatically during the 2010-2030 period. The older population in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as their counterparts in 2000, growing from 35 million to 72 million and representing nearly 20 percent of the total U.S. population." (p. 2)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2010). Older Americans 2010: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2010_Documents/Docs/OA_2010.pdf

This report uses data from over a dozen national data sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Health and Retirement Survey, the American Time Use Survey, etc.

According to 2009 Bureau of Labor Satistics projections, "the baby-boom generation-those born between 1946 and 1964-is expected to remain in the labor force longer than previous generations. As this group ages, the number of people in the labor force aged 55 to 64 is expected to grow by 33 percent between...

According to 2009 Bureau of Labor Satistics projections, "the baby-boom generation-those born between 1946 and 1964-is expected to remain in the labor force longer than previous generations. As this group ages, the number of people in the labor force aged 55 to 64 is expected to grow by 33 percent between 2008 and 2018, and the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to grow by 78 percent. The numbers of 45- to 54-year-olds and 35- to 44-year-olds are expected to shrink as baby boomers age and shift into older groups."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). The baby-boom generation to remain in the labor force, the editor's desk. Retrieved January 3, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2009/ted_20091231.htm

This analysis is based on labor force projections from the Employment Projections Program of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to 2009 BLS projections, among the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946-1964), the number of people in the labor force aged 55 to 64 is expected to grow by 33 percent between 2008 and 2018, and the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to grow by 78 percent. The numbers...

According to 2009 BLS projections, among the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946-1964), the number of people in the labor force aged 55 to 64 is expected to grow by 33 percent between 2008 and 2018, and the number of people aged 65 and older is projected to grow by 78 percent. The numbers of 45- to 54-year-olds and 35- to 44-year-olds are expected to shrink, as baby boomers age and shift into older groups, decreasing by 5% and 1%, respectively.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). The baby-boom generation to remain in the labor force: The editor's desk. Retrieved January 13, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2009/ted_20091231.htm

These projections are from the BLS Employment Projections program.

In 2008, baby boomers (people born between 1946-64) made up 26.6% of the United States population and 39.3% of the United States labor force, according to analysis of 2008 Current Population Survey data.

In 2008, baby boomers (people born between 1946-64) made up 26.6% of the United States population and 39.3% of the United States labor force, according to analysis of 2008 Current Population Survey data.

Besen, E. (2008) [Analysis of Current Population Survey]. Unpublished raw data.

This analysis was conducted at the Sloan Center for Aging and Work at Boston College, and was based on the 2008 Current Population Survey of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "the volunteer rate among Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) decreased about half a percentage point, to 29.9 percent, between 2006 and 2007. The Midwest has the highest volunteer rate for Baby Boomers at 36.9 percent."

According to a 2008 report based on Census data, "the volunteer rate among Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) decreased about half a percentage point, to 29.9 percent, between 2006 and 2007. The Midwest has the highest volunteer rate for Baby Boomers at 36.9 percent."

Corporation for National and Community Service. (2008). Volunteering in America: Research highlights. Washington, DC: Corporation for National and Community Service. Retrieved from http://www.volunteeringinamerica.gov/assets/resources/VIA_Brief_FINAL.pdf

The data used in this report were collected through supplements to the September Current Population Survey (CPS) in 1974, 1989, and 2002-2007. Today the CPS is a monthly survey of about 60,000 households (approximately 100,000 adults), conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The purpose of the September supplement is to obtain information on the incidence of volunteering, the characteristics of volunteers, and civic life indicators in the United States.

According to a 2005 analysis of BLS data, the baby boomers, those born between 1946-1964 are shown represent the largest segment (48%) of the U.S. labor force in 2000.  By 2010, the baby boomers labor force participation is expected to represent only 37% of the labor force.Gunderson, S., Roberts,...

According to a 2005 analysis of BLS data, the baby boomers, those born between 1946-1964 are shown represent the largest segment (48%) of the U.S. labor force in 2000.  By 2010, the baby boomers labor force participation is expected to represent only 37% of the labor force.



Gunderson, S., Roberts, J., and Scanland, K. (2005). The Jobs Revolution: Changing How America Works, 2nd edition. Chicago, IL: The Greystone Group.



Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). The 21st century multi-generational workplace (Issue Brief No. 09). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved November 1, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB09_MultiGenWorkplace_001.pdf

In this Issue Brief, we explore how age “matters” at the workplace; how perspectives about age differ according to chronological age, generation, life state and career stage; and the implications for managers who supervise young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older adult employees.

A 2005 survey of baby boomers (i.e. people born between 1946 and 1964), conducted by Merrill Lynch, found that while most older workers want to continue to work, only 6 percent want to work as full-time employees.

A 2005 survey of baby boomers (i.e. people born between 1946 and 1964), conducted by Merrill Lynch, found that while most older workers want to continue to work, only 6 percent want to work as full-time employees.

Merrill Lynch. (2005, February 22)."The new retirement survey" from Merrill Lynch reveals how baby boomers will transform retirement. New York: Merrill Lynch. Retrieved June 27, 2006, from http://www.ml.com/index.asp?id=7695_7696_8149_46028_46503_46635

For the New Retirement Survey, "Harris Interactive® fielded the online and telephone survey between February 5 and March 1, 2004, among a nationwide cross section of 2,348 U.S. adults ages 40 to 58 of whom 1,061 were men and 1,287 were women. Data were weighted to reflect the total U.S. adult population ages 40 to 58 for age, sex, race, region, education and household income. For the telephone survey, data were weighted for the number of voice/telephone lines in the household. For the online survey, propensity score weighting was done to adjust for respondents' propensity to be online."

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