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According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "44% of adults age 50 years and older have a job that they say requires physical effort almost all or most of the time, and another 25% say their job requires physical effort some of the time. Three in ten say...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "44% of adults age 50 years and older have a job that they say requires physical effort almost all or most of the time, and another 25% say their job requires physical effort some of the time. Three in ten say their job requires little to no physical effort. Adults age 50-54 (52%) and adults age 55-59 (55%) are more likely than adults age 60-64 (38%) and adults age 65 and older (39%) to have a job that requires or to have had a job that required physical effort almost all or most of the time". (p.4)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, in 1979, adults age 55+ comprised 14.3% of the labor force. In 2011, that figure had increased to 20.1%.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, in 1979, adults age 55+ comprised 14.3% of the labor force. In 2011, that figure had increased to 20.1%.

Economic Policy Institute. (2012). State of working America, 12th edition. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://stateofworkingamerica.org/

Authors' analysis of Current Population Survey public data series.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, in 1979, the unemployment rate for adults age 55+ was 5.9%. In 2011, the that figure had increased to 9.0%.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, in 1979, the unemployment rate for adults age 55+ was 5.9%. In 2011, the that figure had increased to 9.0%.

Economic Policy Institute. (2012). State of working America, 12th edition. Retrieved October 15, 2012, from http://stateofworkingamerica.org/

Authors' analysis of Current Population Survey public data series.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "unemployment among older workers [age 55 and older] grew in all industries, but percentage point increases were largest in construction and manufacturing. In 2009, 14.3 percent of older construction workers and 10.9 percent of older manufacturing workers...

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "unemployment among older workers [age 55 and older] grew in all industries, but percentage point increases were largest in construction and manufacturing. In 2009, 14.3 percent of older construction workers and 10.9 percent of older manufacturing workers were unemployed, well above the overall 2009 unemployment rate of 6.5 percent for adults age 55 and older." (p. 8)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

Based on a 2008 analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (2001-2002), the total Health and Eating Index (HEI) score for adults age 65 and over was 68 out of the maximum 100 points. There were no significant differences among the HEI total scores for adults age 55-64, 65-74, or...

Based on a 2008 analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (2001-2002), the total Health and Eating Index (HEI) score for adults age 65 and over was 68 out of the maximum 100 points. There were no significant differences among the HEI total scores for adults age 55-64, 65-74, or 75 and over, which ranged from 64-68. (Indicator 23)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics. (2008). Older Americans 2008: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2008_Documents/OA_2008.pdf

This report describes the overall status of the U.S. population age 65 and over, using data from over a dozen national data sources to construct broad indicators of well-being for the older population and to monitor changes in these indicators over time.

According to the 2005 Current Population Study data, 5,365 thousand Americans age 55 or older worked part time, with an additional 180 thousand seeking part-time employment. 8.5% of adults age 55 or older were categorized as members of the part-time labor force, compared to 20.3% of those ages 20 to...

According to the 2005 Current Population Study data, 5,365 thousand Americans age 55 or older worked part time, with an additional 180 thousand seeking part-time employment. 8.5% of adults age 55 or older were categorized as members of the part-time labor force, compared to 20.3% of those ages 20 to 24 and 9.4% of adults ages 25 to 54. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006: 206, 213).


Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2006, January). Employment and earnings. Retrieved January 18, 2007, from http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsa2005.pdf

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey has been conducted for more than 50 years. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. Respondents are interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household 15 years of age and older. However, published data focus on those ages 16 and over. The sample provides estimates for the nation as a whole and serves as part of model-based estimates for individual states and other geographic areas. Estimates obtained from the CPS include employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators...They are available by a variety of demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, marital status, and educational attainment...occupation, industry, and class of worker.

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