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According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the average age at which non-retired Americans expect to retire has increased over time, from 60 in 1995 to 66 this year [2014]. Furthermore, in 1995, more non-retired Americans expected to retire younger -- 15% expected to retire before age 55, compared with 4% in...

According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the average age at which non-retired Americans expect to retire has increased over time, from 60 in 1995 to 66 this year [2014]. Furthermore, in 1995, more non-retired Americans expected to retire younger -- 15% expected to retire before age 55, compared with 4% in 2014."

Riffkin, R. (2014). Average U.S. retirement age rises to 62. US: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/168707/average-retirement-age-rises.aspx

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted April 3-6, 2014, with a random sample of 1,026 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. These trends in Americans' actual vs. expected age of retirement are from Gallup's annual Economy and Personal Finance survey, conducted April 3-6, 2014.

According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the majority of all age groups expect to retire at age 65 or older. This includes 62% of 18- to 29-year-olds, 62% of 30- to 49-year-olds, and 58% of 50- to 64-year-olds."

According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the majority of all age groups expect to retire at age 65 or older. This includes 62% of 18- to 29-year-olds, 62% of 30- to 49-year-olds, and 58% of 50- to 64-year-olds."

Riffkin, R. (2014). Average U.S. retirement age rises to 62. US: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/168707/average-retirement-age-rises.aspx

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted April 3-6, 2014, with a random sample of 1,026 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. These trends in Americans' actual vs. expected age of retirement are from Gallup's annual Economy and Personal Finance survey, conducted April 3-6, 2014.

According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the average age at which U.S. retirees report retiring is 62...while the average age at which non-retired Americans expect to retire [is] 66."

According to a 2014 Gallup report, "the average age at which U.S. retirees report retiring is 62...while the average age at which non-retired Americans expect to retire [is] 66."

Riffkin, R. (2014). Average U.S. retirement age rises to 62. US: Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/168707/average-retirement-age-rises.aspx

Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted April 3-6, 2014, with a random sample of 1,026 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. These trends in Americans' actual vs. expected age of retirement are from Gallup's annual Economy and Personal Finance survey, conducted April 3-6, 2014.

According to the 2012 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 60-plus, "when asked how soon they think they can retire from their current job, more than one-in-ten (12 %) respondents said they don't think they'll ever be able to retire." About one quarter (27%) expect to retire in 1-2 years, one fifth...

According to the 2012 CareerBuilder survey of workers aged 60-plus, "when asked how soon they think they can retire from their current job, more than one-in-ten (12 %) respondents said they don't think they'll ever be able to retire." About one quarter (27%) expect to retire in 1-2 years, one fifth (20%) expect to do to in 3-4 years, and another quarter with 5-6 years (27%).

Careerbuilder. (2013). Majority of workers plan to work after retiring, CareerBuilder survey finds. Chicago: CareerBuilder. Retrieved from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=2/27/2013&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr741_&id=pr741&ed=12/31/2013

The CareerBuilder survey included more than 680 U.S. workers age 60 and older and more than 2,600 hiring managers and human resources professionals between November 1 and November 30, 2012.

According to a 2013 Gallup survey, "37% of nonretired Americans say they expect to retire after age 65, 26% at age 65, and 26% before age 65. The most notable change over time is the increase in those expecting to work past age 65 -- the 37% this year is up from 22% a decade ago and 14% in 1995. Meanwhile,...

According to a 2013 Gallup survey, "37% of nonretired Americans say they expect to retire after age 65, 26% at age 65, and 26% before age 65. The most notable change over time is the increase in those expecting to work past age 65 -- the 37% this year is up from 22% a decade ago and 14% in 1995. Meanwhile, the percentage of nonretirees who say they expect to retire before age 65 has declined to 26% from 49% in 1995."

These results are from Gallup's annual Economy and Personal Finance survey. Results for this Gallup poll are based on telephone interviews conducted April 4-14, 2013, with a random sample of 2,017 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

According to a 2013 analysis of data from EBRI's Retirement Confidence survey, "One in three workers expect to retire at age 70 or never retire; 7 in 10 retirees retired before age 65" (p. 30). "Three in 10 workers report their expected retirement age has changed in the past year; among these workers,...

According to a 2013 analysis of data from EBRI's Retirement Confidence survey, "One in three workers expect to retire at age 70 or never retire; 7 in 10 retirees retired before age 65" (p. 30). "Three in 10 workers report their expected retirement age has changed in the past year; among these workers, the large majority expect to retire later." (p. 31)

AARP. (2013). 2013 retirement confidence survey: A secondary analysis of the findings from respondents age 50+. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/surveys_statistics/general/2013/2013-Retirement-Confidence-Survey-A-Secondary-Analysis-of-the-Findings-from-Respondents-Age-50-Plus-AARP-rsa-gen.pdf

This report presents the findings of a secondary analysis of the Employee Benefit Research Institute's (EBRI) 2013 Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) - focusing on findings from survey respondents (i.e., workers and retirees) age 50 years and older.

According to a 2012 global workforce survey of 32,000 workers worldwide, among full-time employees in large and mid-size organizations, "thirty-nine percent expect to retire somewhat or much later than planned." (p. 2)

According to a 2012 global workforce survey of 32,000 workers worldwide, among full-time employees in large and mid-size organizations, "thirty-nine percent expect to retire somewhat or much later than planned." (p. 2)

Towers Watson. (2012). 2012 global workforce study. Engagement at risk: Driving strong performance in a volatile global environment. New York: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://towerswatson.com/assets/pdf/2012-Towers-Watson-Global-Workforce-Study.pdf

The Towers Watson Global Workforce Study covers more than 32,000 employees selected from research panels that represent the populations of full-time employees working in large and midsize organizations across a range of industries in 29 markets around the world. It was fielded by a third-party vendor via an online questionnaire between February and May 2012.

According to the 2011 EBRI Retirement Confidence Survey, "the percentage of workers who expect to retire after age 65 has increased over time, from 11 percent in 1991 and 1996 to 20 percent in 2001, 25 percent in 2006, and 36 percent in 2011." (p. 1)

According to the 2011 EBRI Retirement Confidence Survey, "the percentage of workers who expect to retire after age 65 has increased over time, from 11 percent in 1991 and 1996 to 20 percent in 2001, 25 percent in 2006, and 36 percent in 2011." (p. 1)

Helman, R., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2011). The 2011 retirement confidence survey: Confidence drops to record lows, reflecting "the new normal". (Issue Brief No. 355). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_03-2011_No355_RCS-2011.pdf

These findings are part of the 21st annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS), which was conducted in January 2011 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,258 individuals (1,004 workers and 254 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States.

According to the 2011 EBRI Retirement Confidence Survey, twenty-three percent of workers ...say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. Of those, the vast majority (89 percent) report that their expected retirement age has increased. This means that 20 percent of all workers...

According to the 2011 EBRI Retirement Confidence Survey, twenty-three percent of workers ...say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. Of those, the vast majority (89 percent) report that their expected retirement age has increased. This means that 20 percent of all workers planned to postpone their retirement in 2011 (down from 25 percent in 2009 and 24 percent in 2010)." (p. 28)

Helman, R., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2011). The 2011 retirement confidence survey: Confidence drops to record lows, reflecting "the new normal". (Issue Brief No. 355). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_03-2011_No355_RCS-2011.pdf

These findings are part of the 21st annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS), which was conducted in January 2011 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,258 individuals (1,004 workers and 254 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States.

According to a 2011 survey of over 4000 adults aged 18+, "over half of workers (54 percent) expect to retire between age 60 and 69. However, more than one-third plan to work past age 70 or never retire. In the last 12 months, 40 percent of workers said they now expect to retire later." (p. 14)

According to a 2011 survey of over 4000 adults aged 18+, "over half of workers (54 percent) expect to retire between age 60 and 69. However, more than one-third plan to work past age 70 or never retire. In the last 12 months, 40 percent of workers said they now expect to retire later." (p. 14)

Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. (2011). The new retirement: Working. 12th annual Transamerica retirement survey. USA: Transamerica Center. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/resources/TCRS12thAnnual%20WorkerNewRetirementFINAL05162011.pdf

A 25 minute, online survey was conducted between January 31, 2011 -- March 10, 2011 among a nationally representative sample of 4,080 workers using the Harris online panel.

According to a 2011 survey of retirees and pre-retirees conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health, "60% of pre-retirees expect to retire at age 65 or older while 26% of retirees did retire at age 65 or older. Further, more pre-retirees now plan to retire later than they expected to during their...

According to a 2011 survey of retirees and pre-retirees conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health, "60% of pre-retirees expect to retire at age 65 or older while 26% of retirees did retire at age 65 or older. Further, more pre-retirees now plan to retire later than they expected to during their 40s as compared to retirees who actually retired later than they expected to during their 40s (39% vs. 12%). There is also a smaller, but still notable, minority of those who have not retired yet who say they never will retire fully (15%)."

Poll: Retirement and health. Summary and chart pack. (2011). Boston: Harvard School of Public Health. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/files/press_release_summary_of_retirement_poll_9.23.11_revised.pdf

Interviews were conducted via telephone (including both landline and cell phone) by SSRS/ICR of Media (PA) July 25 to August 18, 2011 among a nationally representative sample of 1254 adults over 50. It includes 755 are retirees and 409 are pre-retirees (those who have not retired but plan to).

According to the 2010 Retirement Confidence Survey, "the percentage of workers who expect to retire after age 65 has increased over time, from 11 percent in 1991 to 14 percent in 1995, 19 percent in 2000, 24 percent in 2005, and 33 percent in 2010." (p. 1)

According to the 2010 Retirement Confidence Survey, "the percentage of workers who expect to retire after age 65 has increased over time, from 11 percent in 1991 to 14 percent in 1995, 19 percent in 2000, 24 percent in 2005, and 33 percent in 2010." (p. 1)

Helman, R., Greenwald, M., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2010). The 2010 retirement confidence survey: Confidence stabilizing, but preparations continue to erode (Issue Brief No. 340). Washington, D.C.: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_03-2010_No340_RCS.pdf

These findings are part of the 20th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey was conducted in January 2010 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,153 individuals (902 workers and 251 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States.

According to a 2010 report from the Center for Retirement Research, "about 40 percent [of over 1300 survey respondents] expect to retire later than they had before the downturn, with most of those who intend to work longer delaying retirement by four or more years." (p. 3)

According to a 2010 report from the Center for Retirement Research, "about 40 percent [of over 1300 survey respondents] expect to retire later than they had before the downturn, with most of those who intend to work longer delaying retirement by four or more years." (p. 3)

Sass, S., Monk, C., & Haverstick, K. (2010). Workers' response to the market crash: Save more, work more? (Issue Brief No. 10-3). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/ib_10-3.pdf

The Center for Retirement Research surveyed 1,317 workers age 45 to 59 between July and August 2009; the group was drawn from a nationally representative panel maintained by Knowledge Networks.

According to a 2010 report from MetLife and the American Society on Aging, although "more than half (51%) of the comparison group and 45% of the LGBT respondents saying they would like to retire before age 65....only 23% of the general population and 22% of the LGBT population expect to retire before...

According to a 2010 report from MetLife and the American Society on Aging, although "more than half (51%) of the comparison group and 45% of the LGBT respondents saying they would like to retire before age 65....only 23% of the general population and 22% of the LGBT population expect to retire before age 65, and 40% (general population) to 48% (LGBT sample) think they would be at least 70 before they can retire." (p. 6)

MetLife Mature Market Institute and The American Society on Aging. (2010). Still out, still aging: The MetLife study of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender baby boomers. Westport, CT: The MetLife Mature Market Institute and The American Society on Aging. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2010/mmi-still-out-still-aging.pdf

Harris Interactive collected survey responses from 1,201 individuals aged 45-64 who self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT) from Harris Interactive's GLBT Panel. The general population sample included responses from 1,206 individuals of the same age from the Harris Poll Online Panel. Surveys were conducted online between December 10-21, 2009.

According to a 2010 AARP survey of adults who will turn 65 in 2011, "over half (54%) are already retired. Among the 31% who are employed full or part time, over one-third (35%) say thay have retired from a previous career. Almost half of those still remployed say they intend to quite work as soon...

According to a 2010 AARP survey of adults who will turn 65 in 2011, "over half (54%) are already retired. Among the 31% who are employed full or part time, over one-third (35%) say thay have retired from a previous career. Almost half of those still remployed say they intend to quite work as soon as they can, while 40% to not plan to stop working....29% of respondants who were currently working at age 65 say that they expect to retire at age 70."(p. 12)

Love, J. (2010). Approaching 65: A survey of baby boomers turning 65 years old. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/general/approaching-65.pdf

The AARP Turning 65 survey obtained telephone interviews with a sample of 801 respondents who will be turning 65 in 2011 drawn at random from the United States. The interviews were conducted from November 11-November 15, 2010.

According to the 2009 Retirement Confidence Survey, "twenty-eight percent of workers say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. Of those, the vast majority (89 percent) say that they have postponed retirement with the intention of increasing their financial security. Nevertheless,...

According to the 2009 Retirement Confidence Survey, "twenty-eight percent of workers say the age at which they expect to retire has changed in the past year. Of those, the vast majority (89 percent) say that they have postponed retirement with the intention of increasing their financial security. Nevertheless, the median (mid-point) worker expects to retire at age 65, with 21 percent planning to push on into their 70s. The median retiree actually retired at age 62, and 47 percent of retirees say they retired sooner than planned." (p. 2)

Helman, R., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2009). The 2009 retirement confidence survey: Economy drives confidence to record lows; many looking to work longer (Issue Brief No. 328). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_4-2009_RCS1.pdf

These findings are part of the 19th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS), a survey that gauges the views and attitudes of working-age and retired Americans regarding retirement, their preparations for retirement, their confidence with regard to various aspects of retirement, and related issues. The survey was conducted in January 2009 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,257 individuals (1,001 workers and 256 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States. Random digit dialing was used to obtain a representative cross section of the U.S. population. To further increase representation, a cell phone supplement was added to the sample

According to a 2008 report on a survey from the Society of Actuaries, among the respondents who were retired, "half retired before age 60 (52%), while only one in ten of the respondents who were pre-retirees currently in the workforce expect to retire prior to age 60 (10%). The largest share of pre-retirees...

According to a 2008 report on a survey from the Society of Actuaries, among the respondents who were retired, "half retired before age 60 (52%), while only one in ten of the respondents who were pre-retirees currently in the workforce expect to retire prior to age 60 (10%). The largest share of pre-retirees in the workforce report they plan to retire at or after age 65 (36%). Among those in the workforce, nearly three in ten pre-retirees say retirement does not apply to them--in other words, they expect to never retire (28%)." (p. 14)

Society of Actuaries. (2008). Key findings and issues: The phase of retirement and planning for the unexpected. Schaumburg, IL: Society of Actuaries. Retrieved from http://www.soa.org/files/pdf/research-2007-findings-phases.pdf

The survey was conducted through telephone interviews of 801 adults age 45 to 80 (400 retirees, 401 pre-retirees) in the summer of 2007. Households were selected for participation from a nationwide targeted list sample.

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