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In 1985, only 15% of men between 60 and 74 had a college degree. That fraction has since more than doubled, reaching 32%. Even more dramatic is the decline in the share of older men who lack a high school diploma. In 1985, more than 40% of men age 60-74 had not finished high school. By 2011, only 13%...

In 1985, only 15% of men between 60 and 74 had a college degree. That fraction has since more than doubled, reaching 32%. Even more dramatic is the decline in the share of older men who lack a high school diploma. In 1985, more than 40% of men age 60-74 had not finished high school. By 2011, only 13% lacked a high school diploma. (fig. 1, p. 2)

Burtless, G. (2013). Can educational attainment explain the rise in labor force participation at older ages? (Issue Brief No. 13-13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/IB_13-13.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the 1985-2011 Current Population Survey.

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed persons age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 11 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

According to a 2012 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed persons age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 11 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). American Time Use Survey -- 2011 results. Retrieved June 25, 2012, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/atus_06222012.htm

The estimates in this release are based on annual average data from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). The ATUS, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is a continuous survey about how individuals age 15 and over spend their time.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "among wage and salary workers age 25 and over, 61 percent of those with a bachelor's degree or higher were able to adjust their work schedules or location instead of taking time off from work, compared with only 38 percent of workers...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Time Use Survey, "among wage and salary workers age 25 and over, 61 percent of those with a bachelor's degree or higher were able to adjust their work schedules or location instead of taking time off from work, compared with only 38 percent of workers with less than a high school diploma."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Access to and use of leave--2011: Data from the American Time Use Survey. (Economic News Release No. USDL-12-1648). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/leave.nr0.htm

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 10 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

According to a 2011 report on the American Time Use Survey, "in 2010, on the days that they worked, 36 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 10 percent of those with less than a high school diploma."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Work at home and in the workplace, 2010. TED: The editor's desk. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2011/ted_20110624.htm

These data are from the American Time Use Survey, 2010 results, published in 2011 at http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.nr0.htm

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "about 10 percent of female workers age 55 to 64 without high school diplomas were unemployed last year, compared with about 5 percent of their counterparts with college degrees." (p. 10)

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "about 10 percent of female workers age 55 to 64 without high school diplomas were unemployed last year, compared with about 5 percent of their counterparts with college degrees." (p. 10)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "two percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families headed by individuals without a high school diploma. The share for families with a head having only a high school diploma increased to 12.2 percent....

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "two percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families headed by individuals without a high school diploma. The share for families with a head having only a high school diploma increased to 12.2 percent. Approximately 75 percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families whose head was a college graduate." (p. 3-4)

Copeland, C. (2010). Total individual account retirement plan assets, by demographics, 2007, with market adjustments to March 2010 (EBRI Notes, Vol. 31 No. 5). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_05-May10.IAs.pdf

This article examines the distribution of total assets held in individual account retirement plans (401(k)-type plans, IRAs, and Keogh plans) across various demographic characteristics of American families, based on the latest data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

According to a 2010 analysis of job characteristics data, "older workers with less than a high school diploma had the highest share of workers (77.2 percent) in difficult jobs [that is, either physically demanding jobs or jobs with difficult working conditions]. Those with an advanced degree had the...

According to a 2010 analysis of job characteristics data, "older workers with less than a high school diploma had the highest share of workers (77.2 percent) in difficult jobs [that is, either physically demanding jobs or jobs with difficult working conditions]. Those with an advanced degree had the lowest share of workers (22 percent) in difficult jobs."

Rho, H. J. (2010). Hard work? patterns in physically demanding labor among older workers. Washington, DC: Center for Economic and Policy Research. Retrieved from http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/older-workers-2010-08.pdf

This report is based on analysis of job characteristics data from the Occupational Information Network [O*NET] in conjunction with the data from the 2009 Outgoing Rotation Group (ORG) of the Current Population Survey.

According to a 2010 analysis from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, among persons born in the latter years of the baby boom [1957 to 1964], "blacks with less than a high school diploma (as of the 2008-09 survey) spent 47 percent of weeks employed from age 18 to age 44. By comparison, black high school...

According to a 2010 analysis from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, among persons born in the latter years of the baby boom [1957 to 1964], "blacks with less than a high school diploma (as of the 2008-09 survey) spent 47 percent of weeks employed from age 18 to age 44. By comparison, black high school graduates spent 68 percent of weeks employed. Hispanic or Latino high school dropouts spent 59 percent of weeks employed, compared with 74 percent of weeks for Hispanic or Latino high school graduates. White high school dropouts spent 64 percent of weeks employed, and white high school graduates spent 80 percent of weeks employed. Among those with a bachelor's degree, there was little difference between racial and ethnic groups in labor market attachment; each group spent 80 to 82 percent of weeks employed."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Number of jobs held, labor market activity, and earnings growth among the youngest baby boomers: Results from a longitudinal survey summary. Retrieved September 13, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsoy.nr0.htm

These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey of 9,964 men and women who were ages 14 to 22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 43 to 52 when interviewed most recently during the 2008-09 period. These respondents were born in the years 1957 to 1964, the latter years of the baby boom that occurred in the United States from 1946 to 1964.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "employees who are most likely to be able to control their schedule are: women, compared with men (38% versus 35%); employees with at least 4 years of college education (43%), compared with those with either...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "employees who are most likely to be able to control their schedule are: women, compared with men (38% versus 35%); employees with at least 4 years of college education (43%), compared with those with either some postsecondary (34%) or high school diploma/GED/less education (33%);managers or professionals, opposed to other occupations (44 versus 33%, respectively); and employees in service rather than in goods-producing industries (38 versus 30%, respectively). (p. 14-15)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, employees with more access to traditional flextime* include those who are "more highly educated (86% employees with at least some postsecondary education versus 82% employees with a high school diploma or less);...
According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, employees with more access to traditional flextime* include those who are "more highly educated (86% employees with at least some postsecondary education versus 82% employees with a high school diploma or less); managers and professionals (57% versus 37% other employees); men (47% versus 41% women); and workers in service industries (45% versus 38% employees in goods-producing industries."   (p. 17)

*Traditional flextime arrangements allow employees to vary when they start and end their work days within a range of
hours surrounding fixed core operating hours.

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2009 (June) analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics employment data, "workers with less job experience are particularly hard hit -- those age 16-24 face an unemployment rate of 17.8%; 25-54 year olds are seeing 8.5%; and those over 54 are at 7% (up 6.2, 4.5, and 3.9 percentage points,...

According to a 2009 (June) analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics employment data, "workers with less job experience are particularly hard hit -- those age 16-24 face an unemployment rate of 17.8%; 25-54 year olds are seeing 8.5%; and those over 54 are at 7% (up 6.2, 4.5, and 3.9 percentage points, respectively, since the start of the recession)."

In comparison, "unemployment was 14.7% among black workers, 12.2% among Hispanic workers, and 8.7% among white workers (increases of 5.8, 6.0, and 4.3 percentage points, respectively, since the start of the recession).  Male unemployment increased to 10.6% in June, compared to 8.3% for women (increases of 5.6 and 3.5 percentage points).  For workers with a college degree, the unemployment rate is 4.7%, and unemployment among those with only a high school diploma, at 9.8%, is more than double that of college-educated workers." 

Shierholz, H. (2009). Jobs picture for July 2, 2009. Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.epi.org/publications/entry/jobs_picture_20090702/

This report presents an analysis of the June 2, 2009 employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Census data, "In 2007, 41 percent of Hispanics ages 50 to 69 lacked a high school diploma, compared with only 18 percent of non-Hispanic blacks and 8 percent of non-Hispanic whites in the same age group. Only 12 percent of Latinos ages 50 to 69 earned at least a...

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Census data, "In 2007, 41 percent of Hispanics ages 50 to 69 lacked a high school diploma, compared with only 18 percent of non-Hispanic blacks and 8 percent of non-Hispanic whites in the same age group. Only 12 percent of Latinos ages 50 to 69 earned at least a Bachelor's degree. By contrast, [in the same age group] 17 percent of non-Hispanic blacks and 31 percent of non-Hispanic whites completed college." (p. 8)

Johnson, R. W., & Soto, M. (2009). 50+ Hispanic workers: A growing segment of the U.S. workforce. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/hispanic_workers_09.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, as well as from the U.S. Department of Labor, University of Michigan and the Urban Institute.

According to a 2008 analysis of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), in 2005 the median net worth of households with family head aged 65 or more was $59,500 if the family head had no high-school diploma, compared to $184,000 for those with a high school diploma, and $412,100 for those...

According to a 2008 analysis of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), in 2005 the median net worth of households with family head aged 65 or more was $59,500 if the family head had no high-school diploma, compared to $184,000 for those with a high school diploma, and $412,100 for those with some or more college education. (Table 10-2008)

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics. (2008). Older Americans 2008: Key indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved from http://agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2008_Documents/OA_2008.pdf

This report describes the overall status of the U.S. population age 65 and over, using data from over a dozen national data sources to construct broad indicators of well-being for the older population and to monitor changes in these indicators over time.

A 2008 analysis of Census Bureau data shows that, "in 2007, 28.7 percent of men age 50 and older with a graduate-level education received an annuity and/or pension income, compared with 19.8 percent of men without a high school diploma -- a differential of 8.9 percentage points." (p. 2)

A 2008 analysis of Census Bureau data shows that, "in 2007, 28.7 percent of men age 50 and older with a graduate-level education received an annuity and/or pension income, compared with 19.8 percent of men without a high school diploma -- a differential of 8.9 percentage points." (p. 2)

McDonnell, K. (2008). Retirement annuity and employment-based pension income among individuals age 50 and over: 2007 (EBRI Notes Vol. 29 No. 11). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_11-2008.pdf

This article provides an analysis of data from the March 2008 Census Bureau's Current Population survey on retirement annuity and pension income for the population age 50 and over.

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "on the days that they worked in 2007, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home...35 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home compared with only 6 percent of those...

According to the 2007 American Time Use Survey, "on the days that they worked in 2007, 20 percent of employed persons did some or all of their work at home...35 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home compared with only 6 percent of those with less than a high school diploma. Multiple jobholders were much more likely to work at home than were single jobholders -- 31 versus 18 percent."

U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2007). Working at home in 2007, MLR: The editor's desk. Retrieved 7/7/2008 from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2008/jun/wk5/art03.htm 

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) provides nationally representative estimates of how, where, and with whom Americans spend their time, and is the only federal survey providing data on the full range of nonmarket activities, from childcare to volunteering.

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