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According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities also cite their health (65%), the need for benefits through an employer such as health insurance (61%), ability to do the job (58%), and job satisfaction (54%) as extremely or very important factors in their decision. Wanting more free time and the retirement plans of spouses and partners are viewed as less important factors (with 38 and 37% respectively designated as very or extremely important)." (p.7)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "81% of U.S. employees reported overall satisfaction with their current job, with 38% of employees indicating they were'very satisfied' and 43% 'somewhat satisfied.'  Employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs is down five percentage points...

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "81% of U.S. employees reported overall satisfaction with their current job, with 38% of employees indicating they were'very satisfied' and 43% 'somewhat satisfied.'  Employees' overall satisfaction with their jobs is down five percentage points from its peak of 86% in 2009 and four percentage points above its low in 2002 (77%)." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "83% of employees reported that they are determined to accomplish their work goals and confident they can meet their goals." (p. 3)

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "83% of employees reported that they are determined to accomplish their work goals and confident they can meet their goals." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "79% of employees reported satisfaction with their relationship with their co-workers." (p. 3)

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "79% of employees reported satisfaction with their relationship with their co-workers." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "75% of employees were satisfied with opportunities to use their skills and abilities at work." (p. 3)

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "75% of employees were satisfied with opportunities to use their skills and abilities at work." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization’s web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "72% of employees were satisfied with how their work contributed to their organization's business goals." (p. 3)

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "72% of employees were satisfied with how their work contributed to their organization's business goals." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "71% of employees reported that they frequently felt that they were putting all their effort into their work and that they were satisfied with their relationship with their immediate supervisor." (p. 3)

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "71% of employees reported that they frequently felt that they were putting all their effort into their work and that they were satisfied with their relationship with their immediate supervisor." (p. 3)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization’s web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "employees' top five very important factors contributing to job satisfaction were: opportunities to use skills and abilities (63%), displaced job security (61%), compensation/pay (60%), communication between employees and senior management (57%),...

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "employees' top five very important factors contributing to job satisfaction were: opportunities to use skills and abilities (63%), displaced job security (61%), compensation/pay (60%), communication between employees and senior management (57%), relationship with immediate supervisor (54%)." (p. 4-5)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "among the top 20 components of job satisfaction, only two showed significant differences based on age." Career advancement ranked 12th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 33% of Baby Boomers, compared to 50% of Millennials...

According to the 2012 SHRM survey on job satisfaction, "among the top 20 components of job satisfaction, only two showed significant differences based on age." Career advancement ranked 12th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 33% of Baby Boomers, compared to 50% of Millennials and 51% of Generation X . An organizations' financial stability was ranked 7th in overall importance; it was ranked as very important by 56% of Baby Boomers, 55% of Generation X, and 39% of Millenials. (Table 9, p 60)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, flexibility to balance life and work issues ranked 11th in overall importance by all employees, with 46% ranking it as a very important aspect of job satisfaction. (fig 2, p. 7)

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, flexibility to balance life and work issues ranked 11th in overall importance by all employees, with 46% ranking it as a very important aspect of job satisfaction. (fig 2, p. 7)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, among the 46% of employees who ranked flexibility to balance life and work issues as very important to their job satisfaction, 36% were satisfied with the level of flexibility offered, a gap of 10%. (Table 7, p. 58)

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, among the 46% of employees who ranked flexibility to balance life and work issues as very important to their job satisfaction, 36% were satisfied with the level of flexibility offered, a gap of 10%. (Table 7, p. 58)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, the most important aspect of job satisfaction for Baby Boomers is the opportunity to use skills and abilities, with 63% ranking this as very important. The other aspects among the top five for Baby Boomers are Job...

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, the most important aspect of job satisfaction for Baby Boomers is the opportunity to use skills and abilities, with 63% ranking this as very important. The other aspects among the top five for Baby Boomers are Job Security (61%), compensation/pay (60%), communication between employees and senior management (59%), and the organization's financial stability (56%). (Table 12, p. 64)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, 36% of employees were very satisfied with their access to "flexibility to balance life and work issues", while 31% were somewhat satisfied. Only 8% were somewhat dissatisfied and 4% very dissatisfied, with 21% neutral....

According to the 2012 SHRM Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement research report, 36% of employees were very satisfied with their access to "flexibility to balance life and work issues", while 31% were somewhat satisfied. Only 8% were somewhat dissatisfied and 4% very dissatisfied, with 21% neutral. (Table 8, p. 59)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee job satisfaction and engagement: How employees are dealing with uncertainty. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/StateandLocalResources/StateandLocalStatutesandRegulations/Documents/12-0537%202012_JobSatisfaction_FNL_online.pdf

The sample of employees used in this research was randomly selected from an outside survey research organization's web-enabled employee panel, which is based on the American Community Study. In total, 600 individuals completed the online 2012 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey, yielding a response rate of 83%. The survey was in the field for a period of seven days. All respondents were employed, either full time or part time.

According to a 2011 report on the Generations of Talent study from the Sloan Center on Aging & Work, job satisfaction varies by age. "The level of job satisfaction for respondents aged 30-39 (4.33) at the U.S. worksites is lower than that for respondents under 30 years of age (4.66) and for those...

According to a 2011 report on the Generations of Talent study from the Sloan Center on Aging & Work, job satisfaction varies by age. "The level of job satisfaction for respondents aged 30-39 (4.33) at the U.S. worksites is lower than that for respondents under 30 years of age (4.66) and for those aged 50 and above (4.55) in the United States." (p. 43, fig. 3.2.3)

Sarkisian, N., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Carapinha, R., Bhate, R., Lee, J., & Minnich, C. (2011). Effects of country & age on work engagement, job satisfaction & organizational commitment among employees in the United States. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/GOT_USEmployee.pdf

From May 2009 through November 2010, The Sloan Center on Aging & Work collaborated with seven multinational companies. In total, 24 worksites in 11 countries participated in the study, and 11,298 individual employees responded to the survey.

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "when the 2009 survey results are compared with those [from their comparable survey] in 1987, the largest decline in overall job satisfaction -- from 70.8 percent in 1987 to 43.4 percent now -- occurred among workers aged 65 and over....Workers under...

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "when the 2009 survey results are compared with those [from their comparable survey] in 1987, the largest decline in overall job satisfaction -- from 70.8 percent in 1987 to 43.4 percent now -- occurred among workers aged 65 and over....Workers under the age of 25 had the second greatest decline, dropping from 55.7 percent in 1987 to 35.7% in 2009." (p. 9)

Franco, L., Gibbons, J., & Barrington, L. (2010). I cant get no ... job satisfaction, that is: America's unhappy workers (Research Report No. 1459-09-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

This report is based on a 2009 survey of 5,000 U.S. households conducted for The Conference Board by TNS.

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "approximately 60 percent of baby boomers were satisfied with their jobs in 1987. By 2000, job satisfaction for this segment had dropped below the 50 percent mark, and it has continued to drop since then. Today, only about 46 percent of employees...

In a 2009 survey conducted for The Conference Board, "approximately 60 percent of baby boomers were satisfied with their jobs in 1987. By 2000, job satisfaction for this segment had dropped below the 50 percent mark, and it has continued to drop since then. Today, only about 46 percent of employees above the age of 45 [baby boomers] report being satisfied with their jobs. This represents a full 15 percent drop during the course of their careers." (p. 13)

Franco, L., Gibbons, J., & Barrington, L. (2010). I can't get no ... job satisfaction, that is: Americas unhappy workers (Research Report No. 1459-09-RR). New York: The Conference Board.

This report is based on a 2009 survey of 5,000 U.S. households conducted for The Conference Board by TNS.

According to a 2010 Pew survey, among workers who were unemployed for some period during the recession but are now re-employed, "nearly eight-in-ten re-employed workers say they are satisfied with their current job. But the job satisfaction share is even higher--89%--among workers who did not suffer...

According to a 2010 Pew survey, among workers who were unemployed for some period during the recession but are now re-employed, "nearly eight-in-ten re-employed workers say they are satisfied with their current job. But the job satisfaction share is even higher--89%--among workers who did not suffer a spell of unemployment during the recession. Moreover, the reemployed are more likely to feel overqualified for their current position than those who did not lose a job (54% vs. 36%)."

Morin, R. (2010). Back at work but...most ‘re-employed’ workers say they’re overqualified for their new job. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/763-re-employed-workers.pdf

This report is based on data from telephone interviews conducted May 11-31, 2010. 2,967 interviews, including 376 with adults working full- or part-time at the time of the survey who were unemployed at some point since the recession began in December, 2007.

According to a 2010 report from the Families and Work Institute, among employees with high access to workplace flexibility, "69% have high job satisfaction, 17% have moderate job satisfaction and 14% have low job satisfaction." Among those with low access to flexibility, 25% report high job satisfaction,...

According to a 2010 report from the Families and Work Institute, among employees with high access to workplace flexibility, "69% have high job satisfaction, 17% have moderate job satisfaction and 14% have low job satisfaction." Among those with low access to flexibility, 25% report high job satisfaction, 25% moderate, and 50% low. (p. 36)

Galinsky, E., Sakai, K., & Wigton, T. (2010). Workplace flexibility among small employers. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/nscw08_workflex_DOL_101018.pdf

The findings in this report come from analysis of two comprehensive nationally representative studies of employers and employees conducted by Families and Work Institute: a study of employers -- the 2008 National Study of Employers and a study of employees -- the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "more than 3 in 4 employees with above-average flexibility and support [for flexibility from their employers] also report high job satisfaction." (p. 52)

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, "more than 3 in 4 employees with above-average flexibility and support [for flexibility from their employers] also report high job satisfaction." (p. 52)

Tang, C., & Wadsworth, S. M. (2010). Time and workplace flexibility. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/time_work_flex.pdf

The 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) survey was conducted by Harris Interactive, Inc. (formerly Louis Harris and Associates) using a questionnaire developed by the Families and Work Institute.A total of 3,502 interviews were completed with a nationwide cross-section of employed adults between November 12, 2007 and April 20, 2008.

According to a 2009 survey of adults in the labor force, "job satisfaction has declined. A third (33%) of workers say they are less satisfied with their job than a year ago. In 2008, just a quarter (25%) were less satisfied. Correspondingly, 35% of workers are less satisfied with their job security...

According to a 2009 survey of adults in the labor force, "job satisfaction has declined. A third (33%) of workers say they are less satisfied with their job than a year ago. In 2008, just a quarter (25%) were less satisfied. Correspondingly, 35% of workers are less satisfied with their job security than a year ago. (p. 6)

Van Horn, C. (2009). The distressed American worker: Fears of permanent job loss soar (Work Trends Survey No. 2009). New Brunswick, NJ: Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/WT%2018%20report(1).pdf

The national survey was conducted March 19-29, 2009, among 700 adults in the labor force, defined as those working full- or part-time jobs or unemployed and actively seeking employment.

According to a 2008 survey of recent retirees, "three-quarters of retirees (76 percent) report that their ability to afford retirement was an extremely or very important factor in their decision to retire. Two other factors are also mentioned by a majority of retirees as reasons for retiring: their...

According to a 2008 survey of recent retirees, "three-quarters of retirees (76 percent) report that their ability to afford retirement was an extremely or very important factor in their decision to retire. Two other factors are also mentioned by a majority of retirees as reasons for retiring: their job satisfaction (63 percent extremely or very important) and a desire for more personal or family time (60 percent) . Nearly half (46 percent) say that their own health was an extremely or very important reason for their retirement." (p. 5)

Helman, R., Copeland, C., VanDerhei, J., & Salisbury, D. (2008). EBRI 2008 recent retirees survey: Report of findings (Issue Brief No. 319). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_07-2008.pdf

This report presents the results of a survey conducted by Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc., on behalf of the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) to examine the factors that cause aerospace and defense industry workers to retire when they do and what might prompt them to delay their retirement. Online interviewing for the survey was conducted by Greenwald & Associates between March 24 and April 7, 2008. Completed responses from 5,722 retirees were received to the survey, for an overall response rate of 30 percent. Individual company response rates ranged between 22 and 41 percent.

A 2007 study of employee benefits trends "reveals a strong correlation between benefits satisfaction and job satisfaction. Among employees who are "highly satisfied" with their benefits, 80% indicate strong job satisfaction, up from 65% in 2005." (p. 19)

A 2007 study of employee benefits trends "reveals a strong correlation between benefits satisfaction and job satisfaction. Among employees who are "highly satisfied" with their benefits, 80% indicate strong job satisfaction, up from 65% in 2005." (p. 19)

Metlife. (2007). Study of employee benefits trends: Findings from the national survey of employers and employees. New York, NY: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved February 13, 2008 from http://www.whymetlife.com/trends/

This study summarizes the results of a national survey of 1,514 benefits decision-makers and 1,202 full-time employees concerning employee benefits, marketplace trends and their overall financial situations.

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 56% of workers aged 50 and older report a high level of job satisfaction, compared to 35% with moderate and 9% with low satisfaction. In comparison, 45% of employees in their middle years (aged 31-49) report high...

A 2007 analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce indicates that 56% of workers aged 50 and older report a high level of job satisfaction, compared to 35% with moderate and 9% with low satisfaction. In comparison, 45% of employees in their middle years (aged 31-49) report high satisfaction, while 45% in that age group report moderate and 11% low. More younger workers have low (13%) and moderate (52%) satisfaction, with 35% reporting high satisfaction. (fig. 9, p. 8)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

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