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According to a 2014 report from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, "the National Retirement Readiness Index [NRRI]* level for 2013 was 52 percent, only slightly better than the 53 percent reported for 2010. In comparison, the NRRI was 31% in 1983. *The NRRI shows the share of working-age...

According to a 2014 report from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, "the National Retirement Readiness Index [NRRI]* level for 2013 was 52 percent, only slightly better than the 53 percent reported for 2010. In comparison, the NRRI was 31% in 1983. *The NRRI shows the share of working-age house- holds who are 'at risk' of being unable to maintain their pre-retirement standard of living in retirement, based on analysis of data from the Federal Reserve's Survey of Consumer Finances.

Munnell, A. H., Hou, W., & Webb, A. (2014). NRRI update shows half still falling short. (Report No. 14-20). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IB_14-20-508.pdf

The NRRI shows the share of working-age house- holds who are 'at risk' of being unable to maintain their pre-retirement standard of living in retirement. The Index is constructed using the SCF, a triennial survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. households that collects detailed information on their assets, liabilities, and demographic characteristics.

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, 36% of the nation's young adults ages 18-31--the so-called Millenial generation--were living in their parents' home." (p. 1)

According to a 2013 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "in 2012, 36% of the nation's young adults ages 18-31--the so-called Millenial generation--were living in their parents' home." (p. 1)

Fry, R. (2013). A rising share of young adults live in their parents' home. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from ;http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2013/07/SDT-millennials-living-with-parents-07-2013.pdf

This report is based on analysis of the March 2012 Current Population Survey.

According to a 2011 AARP survey, of 1300 members of the aged 50-plus population who are working or looking for work, or who have recently left the labor force, about one in four (26 percent) thought that their standard of living in retirement will be somewhat (19 percent) or much (7 percent) better...

According to a 2011 AARP survey, of 1300 members of the aged 50-plus population who are working or looking for work, or who have recently left the labor force, about one in four (26 percent) thought that their standard of living in retirement will be somewhat (19 percent) or much (7 percent) better than that of the previous generation, while nearly half (47 percent) felt that it will be somewhat (31 percent) or much (16 percent) worse (figure 7). (p. 4)

Rix, S. E. (2011). 50+ and worried about today and tomorrow: Older Americans express concerns about the state of the economy and their current and future financial well-being. (Fact Sheet No. 242). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2011/fs242.pdf

In late August 2011, the AARP Public Policy Institute surveyed a random sample of noninstitutionalized men and women aged 50 and over who had been part of a sample of 5,027 people. In the follow-up survey (second wave), 1,304 people aged 50-plus were interviewed.

According to a 2011 AARP survey, of 1300 members of the aged 50-plus population who are working or looking for work, or who have recently left the labor force, about one in four (26 percent) thought that their standard of living in retirement will be somewhat (19 percent) or much (7 percent) better...

According to a 2011 AARP survey, of 1300 members of the aged 50-plus population who are working or looking for work, or who have recently left the labor force, about one in four (26 percent) thought that their standard of living in retirement will be somewhat (19 percent) or much (7 percent) better than that of the previous generation, while nearly half (47 percent) felt that it will be somewhat (31 percent) or much (16 percent) worse. (p. 4)

Rix, S. E. (2011). 50+ and worried about today and tomorrow: Older Americans express concerns about the state of the economy and their current and future financial well-being. (Fact Sheet No. 242). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2011/fs242.pdf

In late August 2011, the AARP Public Policy Institute surveyed a random sample of noninstitutionalized men and women aged 50 and over who had been part of a sample of 5,027 people. In the follow-up survey (second wave), 1,304 people aged 50-plus were interviewed.

A 2008 report on retirement preparedness indicates that "44 percent [of respondents] will be 'at risk' of being unable to maintain their standard of living in retirement. An analysis by age group indicates that...about 35 percent of the Early Boomers (those born between 1948 and 1954) will not...

A 2008 report on retirement preparedness indicates that "44 percent [of respondents] will be 'at risk' of being unable to maintain their standard of living in retirement. An analysis by age group indicates that...about 35 percent of the Early Boomers (those born between 1948 and 1954) will not have an adequate retirement income. This share increases to 44 percent for the Late Boomers (those born between 1955 and 1964), and then rises to 48 percent for the Generation Xers (those born between 1965 and 1974)." (p. 1)

Munnell, A. H., Golub-Sass, F., Soto, M., & Webb, A. (2008). Do households have a good sense of their retirement preparedness? (Issue Brief No. 8-11). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/ib_8-11.pdf

The National Retirement Risk Index (NRRI) measures the percentage of working-age households who are 'at risk' of being financially unprepared for retirement today and in coming decades. The NRRI is based on analysis of the U.S. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Survey of Consumer Finances, 2004.

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