Topic : Fact Record | Keywords : All

Click here to start a new search.
Limit the Results
 
32 Records Retrieved
| 0 Selected
According to the 2012 Engagement Study from Randstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents and 80...

According to the 2012 Engagement Study from Randstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents and 80 percent of millennials). These workers additionally perceive a higher morale in the workplace than other age groups, with 69 percent of millennials and 64 percent of mature workers born finding a positive energy at work, compared to just a 53 percent average among other generational groups."

Ranstad. (2013). Talking about my generation: New study finds millennial and mature workers' attitudes align. USA: Ranstad. Retrieved from http://www.randstadusa.com/about-randstad/press-room/talking-about-my-generation-new-study-finds-millennial-and-mature-workers-attitudes-align

The Randstad Engagement Index is comprised of findings from quarterly waves of research targeting employees and annual surveys of employers. The sixth wave of findings was conducted online Nov. 1 - 13, 2012 from a national sample of 3,417 adults aged 18 and older who are currently employed full time from Ipsos’ U.S. online panel.

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents...

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, "89 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) and 75 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) say they enjoy going to work every day, and a majority of both groups feels inspired to do their best at work (95 percent of mature respondents and 80 percent of millennials)."

Ranstad. (2013). Talking about my generation: New study finds millennial and mature workers' attitudes align. USA: Ranstad. Retrieved from http://www.randstadusa.com/about-randstad/press-room/talking-about-my-generation-new-study-finds-millennial-and-mature-workers-attitudes-align

The Randstad Engagement Index is comprised of findings from quarterly waves of research targeting employees and annual surveys of employers. The sixth wave of findings was conducted online Nov. 1 - 13, 2012 from a national sample of 3,417 adults aged 18 and older who are currently employed full time from Ipsos' U.S. online panel. Weighting was used to balance demographics and ensure samples reflect the U.S. population of working adults.

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, 69 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) and 64 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) report "finding a positive energy at work, compared to just a 53 percent average among other generational groups."

According to a 2013 analysis of survey data from Ranstad, 69 percent of millennials (born 1982-1994) and 64 percent of mature workers (born before 1946) report "finding a positive energy at work, compared to just a 53 percent average among other generational groups."

Ranstad. (2013). Talking about my generation: New study finds millennial and mature workers' attitudes align. USA: Ranstad. Retrieved from http://www.randstadusa.com/about-randstad/press-room/talking-about-my-generation-new-study-finds-millennial-and-mature-workers-attitudes-align

The Randstad Engagement Index is comprised of findings from quarterly waves of research targeting employees and annual surveys of employers. The sixth wave of findings was conducted online Nov. 1 - 13, 2012 from a national sample of 3,417 adults aged 18 and older who are currently employed full time from Ipsos' U.S. online panel. Weighting was used to balance demographics and ensure samples reflect the U.S. population of working adults.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers are three times as likely to hire a mature worker (60 percent) as they are to hire a Millennial (20 percent)."

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers are three times as likely to hire a mature worker (60 percent) as they are to hire a Millennial (20 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think mature workers and Millennials possess different personality traits. For example, hiring managers are most likely to associate mature workers with being reliable (91 percent) and professional (88 percent) while they say Millennial workers are creative (74 percent) and strong networkers (73 percent)."

Adecco Staffing Mature Worker Survey – Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "when it comes to skills that need strengthening, hiring managers feel mature workers need more technological know-how (72 percent), while that is the skill that Millennials need to develop least (5 percent)." Millennials, on the other hand, need to improve their writing skills (46 percent), while far fewer mature workers need to do so (9 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "hiring managers think that a challenge in hiring a mature worker is their resistance to taking direction from younger management (33 percent). Similarly, 27 percent of hiring managers also believe that a challenge in hiring a Millennial is their resistance to taking direction from older management."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "mature workers' biggest interview mistake is having high salary/ compensation demands (51 percent), followed by overconfidence in their abilities and experience (48 percent)."

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "mature workers' biggest interview mistake is having high salary/ compensation demands (51 percent), followed by overconfidence in their abilities and experience (48 percent)."

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "91% of hiring managers say mature workers are reliable." Hiring managers also report that they regard older workers as professional (85%), good listeners (77%), and organized (77%), and that they have a positive work ethic (75%)...

According to a 2012 survey of hiring managers at 500 U.S. companies, "91% of hiring managers say mature workers are reliable." Hiring managers also report that they regard older workers as professional (85%), good listeners (77%), and organized (77%), and that they have a positive work ethic (75%) and strong leadership/magagerial skills (75%).

Telephone survey of 501 hiring managers (those responsible for making hiring decisions at their company, division, group or job), fielded by Braun Research from August 23-30, 2012. Differences between various demographics groups were also explored: Gender and Geographic Region. Survey results have a margin of error +/- 4.4% for this sample size.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "among the occupations that ranked as the top 10 occupations with the highest concentrations of mature workers, "the concentration of mature workers in these occupations ranged from a high of 44% among tax preparers to over one-third...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "among the occupations that ranked as the top 10 occupations with the highest concentrations of mature workers, "the concentration of mature workers in these occupations ranged from a high of 44% among tax preparers to over one-third (35%) among taxi drivers and chauffers." (Table 2)

Fogg, N. P., & Harrington, P. E. (2012). Occupational profiles for the mature worker: Finding and using detailed information about occupations with the largest share of mature workers. Chicago: Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL). Retrieved from http://www.cael.org/pdfs/TMT_Occupational_Profiles

We identified those occupations with the highest concentration of workers aged 55 and above through an analysis of the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) public use data files. we also used the ACS data in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupation Information Network, known as the O*NET information system, to develop the specific occupational profiles in this study.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "among the occupations that ranked as the top 10 occupations with the highest concentrations of mature workers, "the median age of workers in 8 out of these 10 occupations in 2010 was over 50. This means that half of all workers...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "among the occupations that ranked as the top 10 occupations with the highest concentrations of mature workers, "the median age of workers in 8 out of these 10 occupations in 2010 was over 50. This means that half of all workers in 8 out of the top 10 mature worker intensive occupations had already celebrated their fiftieth birthday in 2010." (Table 2, p. 9)

Fogg, N. P., & Harrington, P. E. (2012). Occupational profiles for the mature worker: Finding and using detailed information about occupations with the largest share of mature workers. Chicago: Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL). Retrieved from http://www.cael.org/pdfs/TMT_Occupational_Profiles

We identified those occupations with the highest concentration of workers aged 55 and above through an analysis of the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) public use data files. we also used the ACS data in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupation Information Network, known as the O*NET information system, to develop the specific occupational profiles in this study.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "across all occupations, the intensity of work measured by mean weekly hours of employment for workers of all ages (16+) was not very different from the work intensity of mature workers. In 2010, the mean weekly hours of employment...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "across all occupations, the intensity of work measured by mean weekly hours of employment for workers of all ages (16+) was not very different from the work intensity of mature workers. In 2010, the mean weekly hours of employment among workers of all ages was 38 hours; only one hour more than the mean weekly hours of employment among mature workers." (p. 13)

Fogg, N. P., & Harrington, P. E. (2012). Occupational profiles for the mature worker: Finding and using detailed information about occupations with the largest share of mature workers. Chicago: Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL). Retrieved from http://www.cael.org/pdfs/TMT_Occupational_Profiles

We identified those occupations with the highest concentration of workers aged 55 and above through an analysis of the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) public use data files. we also used the ACS data in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupation Information Network, known as the O*NET information system, to develop the specific occupational profiles in this study.

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "in 2010, nearly 6% of all workers reported a disability....Mature workers were more likely to have a disability. Among all mature workers the incidence of disability was 11.4%, nearly twice as high as the rate of disability among...

According to a 2012 analysis of data from the American Community Survey, "in 2010, nearly 6% of all workers reported a disability....Mature workers were more likely to have a disability. Among all mature workers the incidence of disability was 11.4%, nearly twice as high as the rate of disability among workers of all ages." (Figure 4).

Fogg, N. P., & Harrington, P. E. (2012). Occupational profiles for the mature worker: Finding and using detailed information about occupations with the largest share of mature workers. Chicago: Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL). Retrieved from http://www.cael.org/pdfs/TMT_Occupational_Profiles

We identified those occupations with the highest concentration of workers aged 55 and above through an analysis of the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) public use data files. we also used the ACS data in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupation Information Network, known as the O*NET information system, to develop the specific occupational profiles in this study.

According to a 2010 Careerbuilder survey of 500 workers aged 60+, "More than one-in-four (28 percent) mature workers age 60 plus plan to retire within the next two years, while 27 percent are planning to retire in three to four years, and 18 percent in the next five to six years. Sixteen percent estimate...

According to a 2010 Careerbuilder survey of 500 workers aged 60+, "More than one-in-four (28 percent) mature workers age 60 plus plan to retire within the next two years, while 27 percent are planning to retire in three to four years, and 18 percent in the next five to six years. Sixteen percent estimate it will be seven years or more before they can stop working, while one-in-ten workers (10 percent) don't think they'll ever be able to retire."

Careerbuilder. (2011). Fewer workers age 60 and up postponing retirement, finds new CareerBuilder survey. Retrieved January 29, 2011, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr617&sd=1%2f26%2f2011&ed=1%2f26%2f2011&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr617_

The nationwide survey was conducted among more than 500 U.S. workers age 60 and up between November 15 and December 2, 2010.

According to a 2010 Careerbuilder survey of 500 workers aged 60+, "the primary drivers for postponing retirement are financial restraints, as indicated by 65 percent of respondents, and the need for health insurance and other benefits, as indicated by 58 percent of respondents. However, mature workers...

According to a 2010 Careerbuilder survey of 500 workers aged 60+, "the primary drivers for postponing retirement are financial restraints, as indicated by 65 percent of respondents, and the need for health insurance and other benefits, as indicated by 58 percent of respondents. However, mature workers are staying on board at their companies for a variety of other reasons, including: enjoy their job (39 percent); enjoy where they work (36 percent); fear retirement may just be boring (26 percent); enjoy feeling needed (14 percent)."

Careerbuilder. (2011). Fewer workers age 60 and up postponing retirement, finds new CareerBuilder survey. Retrieved January 29, 2011, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr617&sd=1%2f26%2f2011&ed=1%2f26%2f2011&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr617_

The nationwide survey was conducted among more than 500 U.S. workers age 60 and up between November 15 and December 2, 2010.

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey, "7 percent of employers reported mature workers have applied for internships at their organizations. Four percent have hired mature workers while 55 percent would be willing to consider mature workers for internships."

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey, "7 percent of employers reported mature workers have applied for internships at their organizations. Four percent have hired mature workers while 55 percent would be willing to consider mature workers for internships."

Careerbuilder. (2010). Mature job seekers considering entry-level jobs, internships, relocation and starting their own business, CareerBuilder survey finds. Retrieved August 31, 2010, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr512&sd=7/22/2009&ed=07/22/2009

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris InteractiveВ© on behalf of CareerBuilder between May 22 and June 10, 2009 among 921 U.S. workers ages 18 and over who have been laid off in the past 12 months from a full-time position (percentages for some questions are based on a subset of U.S. workers, based on their responses to certain questions) and 2,667 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time; not self-employed; with at least significant involvement in hiring decisions; non-government) ages 18 and over.

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey, "of mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and did not find a new job, 41 percent stated they would consider relocating to another city or state to find employment."

According to a 2010 CareerBuilder survey, "of mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and did not find a new job, 41 percent stated they would consider relocating to another city or state to find employment."

Careerbuilder. (2010). Mature job seekers considering entry-level jobs, internships, relocation and starting their own business, CareerBuilder survey finds. Retrieved August 31, 2010, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr512&sd=7/22/2009&ed=07/22/2009

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris InteractiveВ© on behalf of CareerBuilder between May 22 and June 10, 2009 among 921 U.S. workers ages 18 and over who have been laid off in the past 12 months from a full-time position (percentages for some questions are based on a subset of U.S. workers, based on their responses to certain questions) and 2,667 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time; not self-employed; with at least significant involvement in hiring decisions; non-government) ages 18 and over.

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "Seven percent of employers reported mature workers have applied for internships at their organizations. Four percent have hired mature workers while 55 percent would be willing to consider mature workers for internships."

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "Seven percent of employers reported mature workers have applied for internships at their organizations. Four percent have hired mature workers while 55 percent would be willing to consider mature workers for internships."

Careerbuilder.com. (2009). Mature job seekers considering entry-level jobs, internships, relocation and starting their own business, CareerBuilder survey finds. Retrieved July 28, 2009, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr512&sd=7/22/2009&ed=12/31/2009&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr512_

"This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder between May 22 and June 10, 2009 among 921 U.S. workers ages 18 and over who have been laid off in the past 12 months from a full-time position...and 2,667 hiring managers and human resource professionals. The survey included respondents ages 18 and older who were full-time workers in the private sector who were laid off in the last 12 months." The sample included around 200 workers age 55 and older. (Jennifer Grasz, personal communication, July 29, 2009)

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "of mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and did not find a job, 23 percent are considering starting their own business."

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "of mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and did not find a job, 23 percent are considering starting their own business."

Careerbuilder.com. (2009). Mature job seekers considering entry-level jobs, internships, relocation and starting their own business, CareerBuilder survey finds. Retrieved July 28, 2009, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr512&sd=7/22/2009&ed=12/31/2009&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr512_

"This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder between May 22 and June 10, 2009 among 921 U.S. workers ages 18 and over who have been laid off in the past 12 months from a full-time position...and 2,667 hiring managers and human resource professionals. The survey included respondents ages 18 and older who were full-time workers in the private sector who were laid off in the last 12 months." The sample included around 200 workers age 55 and older. (Jennifer Grasz, personal communication, July 29, 2009)

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "of those mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and found another job, 26 percent took a job in another field with the vast majority (75 percent) reporting that they are enjoying the experience. In terms of compensation, 40 percent...

According to a 2009 survey of U.S. workers and employers, "of those mature workers who were laid off in the last 12 months and found another job, 26 percent took a job in another field with the vast majority (75 percent) reporting that they are enjoying the experience. In terms of compensation, 40 percent landed positions with similar pay and another 13 percent found jobs with a higher compensation rate than what they were previously earning. Forty-eight percent took a pay cut."

Careerbuilder.com. (2009). Mature job seekers considering entry-level jobs, internships, relocation and starting their own business, CareerBuilder survey finds. Retrieved July 28, 2009, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr512&sd=7/22/2009&ed=12/31/2009&siteid=cbpr&sc_cmp1=cb_pr512_

"This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive on behalf of CareerBuilder between May 22 and June 10, 2009 among 921 U.S. workers ages 18 and over who have been laid off in the past 12 months from a full-time position...and 2,667 hiring managers and human resource professionals. The survey included respondents ages 18 and older who were full-time workers in the private sector who were laid off in the last 12 months." The sample included around 200 workers age 55 and older. (Jennifer Grasz, personal communication, July 29, 2009)

In a 2007 survey of employees, 76% of Mature workers said "Freedom to set own hours if the work gets done" is appealing, compared to 74% of Baby Boomers, 73% of Generation X workers, and 63 % of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 76% of Mature workers said "Freedom to set own hours if the work gets done" is appealing, compared to 74% of Baby Boomers, 73% of Generation X workers, and 63 % of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 46% of Mature workers said a "Full-time job with extended time off as needed for personal reasons" is appealing. In comparison, 56% of Baby Boomers, 59% of Generation X workers, and 53% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 07, p. 12)Generations are defined as: Generation...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 46% of Mature workers said a "Full-time job with extended time off as needed for personal reasons" is appealing. In comparison, 56% of Baby Boomers, 59% of Generation X workers, and 53% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 07, p. 12)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 44% of Mature workers said a "Four-day work week with 10-hour days" is appealing, compared with 58% of Baby Boomers, 52% of Generation X workers, and 42% of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12)Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 44% of Mature workers said a "Four-day work week with 10-hour days" is appealing, compared with 58% of Baby Boomers, 52% of Generation X workers, and 42% of Generation Y workers. (Fig. 07, p. 12)Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 78% of Mature workers and 82% of Baby Boomers perceived computer use to be an "element of success in the workplace." In comparison, 79% of Generation X workers and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p....

In a 2007 survey of employees, 56% of Mature workers and 54% of Baby Boomers perceived "Management Skills" to be an element of success in the workplace. In comparison, 45% of Generation X and 28% of Generation Y workers perceived Management Skills to be important for workplace success. (Fig. 12, p. 17)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19) Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 87% of Mature workers and 81% of Baby Boomers say they currently use a desktop computer for work. In comparison, 75% of Generation X and 71% of Generation Y workers report current desktop computer use. (Fig. 13, p. 19)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 90% of Mature workers rated being "Ethical" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 84% of Baby Boomers, 83% of Generation X workers, and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31) Generations are defined as: Generation...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 90% of Mature workers rated being "Ethical" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 84% of Baby Boomers, 83% of Generation X workers, and 66% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2007 survey of employees, 74% of Mature workers and 70% of Baby Boomers rated being "Professional" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 63% of Generation X workers and 48% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31) Generations are defined as: Generation...

In a 2007 survey of employees, 74% of Mature workers and 70% of Baby Boomers rated being "Professional" as "extremely or very important" to workplace culture. In comparison, 63% of Generation X workers and 48% of Generation Y workers agreed. (Appendix Graph 25, p. 31)

Generations are defined as: Generation Y = adults whose birth year falls between 1980 and 1988; Generation X = 1965 and 1979; Baby Boomer = 1946 and 1964; Mature = 1900 and 1945.

Ranstad Work Solutions. (2007). The world of work 2007. Rochester, NY: Harris Interactive, Inc. Retrieved January 24, 2008 from http://www.us.randstad.com/the%20world%20of%20work%202007.pdf

The findings in this report are based on 3,139 interviews conducted online by Harris Interactive in 2007. Among these are 1,251 employers and 1,888 employees in the United States. The sample for employees consisted of U.S. residents who are 18 years of age or older who are currently employed fulltime or self-employed in a company with at least five employees. For employers, the sample consisted of U.S. business professionals who are 18 years of age or older and who make strategic Human Resources decisions or strongly influence those decisions and have been doing so for at least six months...and who were employed in an organization with at least five employees.

In a 2006 survey of employers, respondents indicated that "the greatest potential risk identified with the exodus of mature workers is the corresponding departure of senior leadership (52 percent), followed by middle management (41 percent) and technical talent and knowledge workers (39 percent)." (p....

In a 2006 survey of employers, respondents indicated that "the greatest potential risk identified with the exodus of mature workers is the corresponding departure of senior leadership (52 percent), followed by middle management (41 percent) and technical talent and knowledge workers (39 percent)." (p. 2)

Corporate Voices for Working Families, WorldatWork, & Buck Consultants. (2006). The real talent debate: Will aging boomers deplete the workforce?. Washington, DC: Corporate Voices for Working Families. Retrieved from http://www.cvworkingfamilies.org/downloads/TalentDebate.pdf?CFID=22487671&CFTOKEN=60403015

In October, 2006, an Internet-based survey was used to evaluate the impact of an aging workforce on the American marketplace. Four hundred eighty-seven organizations contributed to the survey database. Approximately 64 percent of the responses came from companies having 1,000 employees or more, with 20 percent of the companies surveyed reporting at least 20,000 employees. The primary objective of this survey was to assess the overall degree to which respondents considered the pending retirement of "baby boomer" employees, and reduced employee availability in succeeding generations, to be a significant issue.

According to a 2006 survey of employers, among recruiting strategies to attract mature workers, 50.6% of respondents do not proactively pursue mature workers in recruiting. 25.3% attempt to rehire workers who previously retired, and 18.7% report emphasizing maturity and work experience when seeking...

According to a 2006 survey of employers, among recruiting strategies to attract mature workers, 50.6% of respondents do not proactively pursue mature workers in recruiting. 25.3% attempt to rehire workers who previously retired, and 18.7% report emphasizing maturity and work experience when seeking candidates. (p. 13)

Corporate Voices for Working Families, WorldatWork, & Buck Consultants. (2006). The real talent debate: Will aging boomers deplete the workforce?. Washington, DC: Corporate Voices for Working Families. Retrieved from http://www.cvworkingfamilies.org/downloads/TalentDebate.pdf?CFID=22487671&CFTOKEN=60403015

In October, 2006, an Internet-based survey was used to evaluate the impact of an aging workforce on the American marketplace. Four hundred eighty-seven organizations contributed to the survey database. Approximately 64 percent of the responses came from companies having 1,000 employees or more, with 20 percent of the companies surveyed reporting at least 20,000 employees. The primary objective of this survey was to assess the overall degree to which respondents considered the pending retirement of "baby boomer" employees, and reduced employee availability in succeeding generations, to be a significant issue.

In a 2006 survey of employers, "more than 80 percent of respondents, regardless of industry, have not surveyed their mature workers to determine future work preferences or intentions." (p. 2)

In a 2006 survey of employers, "more than 80 percent of respondents, regardless of industry, have not surveyed their mature workers to determine future work preferences or intentions." (p. 2)

Corporate Voices for Working Families, WorldatWork, & Buck Consultants. (2006). The real talent debate: Will aging boomers deplete the workforce?. Washington, DC: Corporate Voices for Working Families. Retrieved from http://www.cvworkingfamilies.org/system/files/TalentDebate.pdf

In October, 2006, an Internet-based survey was used to evaluate the impact of an aging workforce on the American marketplace. Four hundred eighty-seven organizations contributed to the survey database. Approximately 64 percent of the responses came from companies having 1,000 employees or more, with 20 percent of the companies surveyed reporting at least 20,000 employees. The primary objective of this survey was to assess the overall degree to which respondents considered the pending retirement of "baby boomer" employees, and reduced employee availability in succeeding generations, to be a significant issue.

According to a 2004 report from the Families and Work Institute, comparing work priorities of older and younger workers, 22% of boomers are work-centric, comparerd to 12-13% of Gen-Y and Gen-X. In contrast, 50-52% of younger workers are family-centric, compared with 41% of boomers. Similar numbers of...

According to a 2004 report from the Families and Work Institute, comparing work priorities of older and younger workers, 22% of boomers are work-centric, comparerd to 12-13% of Gen-Y and Gen-X. In contrast, 50-52% of younger workers are family-centric, compared with 41% of boomers. Similar numbers of boomers and younger workers are dual centric (35-37%).  Mature workers (58 or older) are most likely to be dual-centric (54%). 

Familes and Work Institute. (2004). Generation and gender in the workplace. Watertown, MA: American Business Collaboration. Retrieved August 16, 2007 from http://www.abcdependentcare.com/docs/ABC-generation-gender-workplace.pdf

"The research findings reported here are drawn from the Families and Work Institute National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). The NSCW is conducted every five years, beginning in 1992 and most recently in 2002. This representative sample of approximately 3,500 workers includes both wage and salaried employees, self-employed workers, and business owners. The data presented here pertain only to wage and salaried employees, ranging in number from 2,800-2,900 across the three administrations of the survey." (p. 33)

32 Records Retrieved
| 0 Selected