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According to a 2013 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, among all US workers, "70 percent have access to medical benefits and 65 percent have access to retirement benefits. A somewhat smaller percentage of workers have access to both benefits (58 percent), while only 12 percent have access...

According to a 2013 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, among all US workers, "70 percent have access to medical benefits and 65 percent have access to retirement benefits. A somewhat smaller percentage of workers have access to both benefits (58 percent), while only 12 percent have access to medical benefits without retirement benefits and 7 percent have access to retirement benefits without medical benefits."

Kimbro, L., & Mayfield, M. (2013). Retirement and medical benefits: Who has both? (Beyond the Numbers, Vol. 2 No. 10). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-2/retirement-and-medical-benefits-who-has-both.htm

This article uses March 2012 National Compensation Survey (NCS) data to examine private industry workers’ access to medical benefits, retirement benefits, and combinations of the two benefits, by major occupation group, wage category, part-time and full-time status, union and nonunion status, and establishment size.

According to a 2013 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "more than three times as many full-time workers have access to medical benefits as their part-time counterparts: 86 percent of full-time workers have access to medical benefits, compared with 24 percent of part-time workers. Similarly,...

According to a 2013 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "more than three times as many full-time workers have access to medical benefits as their part-time counterparts: 86 percent of full-time workers have access to medical benefits, compared with 24 percent of part-time workers. Similarly, full-time workers are nearly twice as likely as part-time workers to have access to retirement benefits: 74 percent for full-time workers and 38 percent for part-time workers. In terms of combinations of both benefits, the majority of full- time workers have access to medical and retirement benefits while the majority of part-time workers have access to neither benefit."

Kimbro, L., & Mayfield, M. (2013). Retirement and medical benefits: Who has both? (Beyond the Numbers, Vol. 2 No. 10). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-2/retirement-and-medical-benefits-who-has-both.htm

This article uses March 2012 National Compensation Survey (NCS) data to examine private industry workers' access to medical benefits, retirement benefits, and combinations of the two benefits, by major occupation group, wage category, part-time and full-time status, union and nonunion status, and establishment size.

According to a 2009 survey on healthcare costs, in regard to future commitments to retiree medical benefits, 36% of employers have tightened restrictions on eligibility or plan to do so. Another 36% have eliminated or plan to eliminate employer subsidy for future retirees, while 26% have made or plan...

According to a 2009 survey on healthcare costs, in regard to future commitments to retiree medical benefits, 36% of employers have tightened restrictions on eligibility or plan to do so. Another 36% have eliminated or plan to eliminate employer subsidy for future retirees, while 26% have made or plan to make changes to cost sharing/employer subsidy for retiree medical benefits. (p. 9)

Towers Perrin. (2009). 2009 health care cost survey -- the health dividend: Capturing the value of employee health. Stamford, CT: Towers Perrin. Retrieved from http://www.towersperrin.com/tp/getwebcachedoc?webc=USA/2009/200901/2009_HCCS_Final_Report.pdf

This survey was conducted between August and September 2008. A total of 609 employers responded. They are primarily Fortunre 1000 companies in all regions of the United States.

According to a 2008 BLS report, "virtually all full-time employees in State and local government had access to retirement and medical benefits: 99 and 98 percent, respectively. In private industry, only 71 percent of full-time workers had access to retirement benefits and 85 percent to medical care."...

According to a 2008 BLS report, "virtually all full-time employees in State and local government had access to retirement and medical benefits: 99 and 98 percent, respectively. In private industry, only 71 percent of full-time workers had access to retirement benefits and 85 percent to medical care." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). Employee benefits in the United States, March 2008. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/ebs2_08072008.pdf

The data are from the March 2008 National Compensation Survey (NCS), which provides comprehensive measures of occupational earnings, compensation cost trends, and incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans. For the first time, this release includes data on benefits for civilian workers. Farm and private household workers, the self-employed, and the Federal government are excluded from the survey.

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