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According to a 2013 analysis of CPS data, "in December 2012, 51.3 percent of unemployed men and women ages 55 to 64 and 40.9 percent of those ages 65 and older had been out of work for more than six months. The corresponding figure for those ages 25 to 54 was 41.8 percent.

According to a 2013 analysis of CPS data, "in December 2012, 51.3 percent of unemployed men and women ages 55 to 64 and 40.9 percent of those ages 65 and older had been out of work for more than six months. The corresponding figure for those ages 25 to 54 was 41.8 percent.

Johnson, R. W., & Park, J. S. (2013). Labor force statistics on older Americans, 2012. (Retirement Security Data Brief No. 8). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412734-Labor-Force-Statistics-on-Older-Americans-2012.pdf

This brief provides annual and monthly labor force statistics on older Americans, a growing segment of the workforce. Drawing on data from the BLS's Current Population Survey, it shows labor force participation rates (the share of the noninstitutionalized civilian population that is employed or looking for work).

According to a 2012 analysis of BLS statistics, "duration of unemployment for jobseekers aged 65 and over averaged 48.3 weeks in March, 2012, compared to 20.2 weeks in December 2007. Long-term unemployment [i.e., out of work for more than 6 weeks] for jobseekers aged 65 and over was 48.9 percent in...

According to a 2012 analysis of BLS statistics, "duration of unemployment for jobseekers aged 65 and over averaged 48.3 weeks in March, 2012, compared to 20.2 weeks in December 2007. Long-term unemployment [i.e., out of work for more than 6 weeks] for jobseekers aged 65 and over was 48.9 percent in March 2012, compared to 23.4 percent at the start of the recession (December 2007). (p. 6-7)

Rix, S. E. (2012). The employment situation, March 2012: Unemployment rises for older workers. (Fact Sheet No. 255). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/research/public_policy_institute/econ_sec/2012/The-Employment-Situation-March-2012-AARP-ppi-econ-sec.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation—March 2012, USDL-12-0614 (Washington, DC: BLS, April 6, 2012);

According to a 2012 analysis of Census Bureau data, during the Great Recession (2007-2009) "the share of workers age 25 or older ever unemployed grew from 17.4 to 20.7 percent...By contrast, the share of workers age 25 or older unemployed for six months or more during a 24-month period doubled, increasing...

According to a 2012 analysis of Census Bureau data, during the Great Recession (2007-2009) "the share of workers age 25 or older ever unemployed grew from 17.4 to 20.7 percent...By contrast, the share of workers age 25 or older unemployed for six months or more during a 24-month period doubled, increasing from 4.6 to 9.3 percent....that is, "a modest rise in the number of people who lost their jobs coupled with a large increase in the amount of time the unemployed spent out of work."

Johnson, R. W., & Butrica, B. A. (2012). Age disparities in unemployment and reemployment during the great recession and recovery (Brief No. 3). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412574-Age-Disparities-in-Unemployment-and-Reemployment-During-the-Great-Recession-and-Recovery.pdf

Data come primarily from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), which has been tracking a large sample of American households from mid-2008 through early 2011.

According to a 2012 analysis of Census Bureau data, during the Great Recession (2007-2009), "12.1 percent of workers age 25 to 34 were unemployed for at least six months, compared with 8.3 percent of those age 50 to 61. Half of workers age 50 to 61 who became unemployed spent at least six months out...

According to a 2012 analysis of Census Bureau data, during the Great Recession (2007-2009), "12.1 percent of workers age 25 to 34 were unemployed for at least six months, compared with 8.3 percent of those age 50 to 61. Half of workers age 50 to 61 who became unemployed spent at least six months out of work (8.3 percent of 16.7 percent), compared with 44 percent of workers age 25 to 34 who lost their jobs." (p. 2)

Johnson, R. W., & Butrica, B. A. (2012). Age disparities in unemployment and reemployment during the great recession and recovery (Brief No. 3). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412574-Age-Disparities-in-Unemployment-and-Reemployment-During-the-Great-Recession-and-Recovery.pdf

Data come primarily from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), which has been tracking a large sample of American households from mid-2008 through early 2011.

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS data, "once unemployed, older workers, on average, continue to be out of work longer than their younger counterparts." Average duration of unemployment in January for jobseekers aged 55 and over was to 44.4 weeks. Average duration of unemployment for younger jobseekers...

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS data, "once unemployed, older workers, on average, continue to be out of work longer than their younger counterparts." Average duration of unemployment in January for jobseekers aged 55 and over was to 44.4 weeks. Average duration of unemployment for younger jobseekers in January was 33.9 weeks. (p. 3)

Rix, S. E. (2011). Unemployment down but overall job growth remains anemic. (Fact Sheet No. 210). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs210-employment.pdf

Statistics in this fact sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--January 2011, USDL-11-0129 (Washington, DC: BLS, February 4, 2011); tables in BLS's Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and July 2009; BLS tables at http://www.bls.gov/web/empsit.supp.toc.htm; and BLS's labor force statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/onescreen/?survey=ln

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS data, "as of January 2011, half of older unemployed workers, or 50.5 percent, were 'long-term unemployed'; that is, they had been out of work for 27 or more weeks" compared to 40.8 percent for younger jobseekers. (p. 3)

According to a 2011 analysis of BLS data, "as of January 2011, half of older unemployed workers, or 50.5 percent, were 'long-term unemployed'; that is, they had been out of work for 27 or more weeks" compared to 40.8 percent for younger jobseekers. (p. 3)

Rix, S. E. (2011). Unemployment down but overall job growth remains anemic. (Fact Sheet No. 210). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs210-employment.pdf

Statistics in this fact sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation—January 2011, USDL-11-0129 (Washington, DC: BLS, February 4, 2011); tables in BLS’s Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and July 2009; BLS tables at http://www.bls.gov/web/empsit.supp.toc.htm; and BLS’s labor force statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/onescreen/?survey=ln

According to a 2010 AARP report, "the total unemployment rate for persons aged 55 and over was 7.2 percent in December, 2009....Nearly half--49.4 percent--of the aged 55-plus unemployed segment of the labor force in December had been out of work for 27 or more weeks. That is more than double the 23...

According to a 2010 AARP report, "the total unemployment rate for persons aged 55 and over was 7.2 percent in December, 2009....Nearly half--49.4 percent--of the aged 55-plus unemployed segment of the labor force in December had been out of work for 27 or more weeks. That is more than double the 23 percent of the older workforce considered long-term unemployed in December 2007." (p. 1)

Rix, S. E. (2010). The employment situation, December 2009: Overall unemployment rate holds steady but ticks up slightly for older workers (Fact Sheet No. 165). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs165-employment.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--December 2009; tables in BLS's Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and January 2010; and BLS's Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/outside.jsp?survey=ln

According to a 2010 AARP report, "the average duration of unemployment for those aged 55 and over in December 2009 was 34.7 weeks. Unemployed persons under age 55 were out of work for an average of 28.1 weeks in December 2009." (p. 3-4)

According to a 2010 AARP report, "the average duration of unemployment for those aged 55 and over in December 2009 was 34.7 weeks. Unemployed persons under age 55 were out of work for an average of 28.1 weeks in December 2009." (p. 3-4)

Rix, S. E. (2010). The employment situation, December 2009: Overall unemployment rate holds steady but ticks up slightly for older workers (Fact Sheet No. 165). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs165-employment.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--December 2009; tables in BLS's Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and January 2010; and BLS's Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/outside.jsp?survey=ln

According to a 2010 AARP report, "as of December 2009, 49.4 percent of the older unemployed workforce and nearly 38.5 percent of the younger unemployed workforce could be classified as "longterm" unemployed; that is, they had been out of work for 27 or more weeks. Both percentages were somewhat lower...

According to a 2010 AARP report, "as of December 2009, 49.4 percent of the older unemployed workforce and nearly 38.5 percent of the younger unemployed workforce could be classified as "longterm" unemployed; that is, they had been out of work for 27 or more weeks. Both percentages were somewhat lower than in November but still well above what they were at the start of the recession. In December 2007, only 23 percent of the older unemployed workforce and 17 percent of the younger were long-term unemployed." (p. 4)

Rix, S. E. (2010). The employment situation, December 2009: Overall unemployment rate holds steady but ticks up slightly for older workers (Fact Sheet No. 165). Washington, DC: AARP Public Policy Institute. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/ppi/econ-sec/fs165-employment.pdf

Statistics in this Fact Sheet are from U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), The Employment Situation--December 2009; tables in BLS's Employment and Earnings, January 2008 and January 2010; and BLS's Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey, available at http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/outside.jsp?survey=ln.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployed population last year included 1.5 million workers age 55 to 64 and 421,000 workers age 65 and older, more than double the number in 2007. The 2009 average monthly unemployment rate for adults age 16 and older was 9.3 percent, about double the...

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "the unemployed population last year included 1.5 million workers age 55 to 64 and 421,000 workers age 65 and older, more than double the number in 2007. The 2009 average monthly unemployment rate for adults age 16 and older was 9.3 percent, about double the 4.6 percent rate in 2007. The unemployment rate was much higher among the youngest workers, with 17.6 percent of those age 16 to 24 out of work and looking for employment in 2009." (p. 3)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "more than two-fifths of out-of-work men age 62 to 69 in 2009 were unemployed for more than six months, compared with just less than a third of out-of-work men age 35 to 44. In December 2009, nearly half (48.8 percent) of unemployed men age 55 to 61 were out...

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "more than two-fifths of out-of-work men age 62 to 69 in 2009 were unemployed for more than six months, compared with just less than a third of out-of-work men age 35 to 44. In December 2009, nearly half (48.8 percent) of unemployed men age 55 to 61 were out of work for more than six months." (p. 12)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "about half of unemployed women age 55 to 61 and about two-thirds of those age 62 to 64 spent more than six months out of work in December 2009." (p. 12-13)

According to a 2010 Urban Institute report, "about half of unemployed women age 55 to 61 and about two-thirds of those age 62 to 64 spent more than six months out of work in December 2009." (p. 12-13)

Johnson, R. W., & Mommaerts, C. (2010). How did older workers fare in 2009?. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Retrieved from http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412039_older_workers.pdf

This report is based on data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS. The analysis compares 2009 outcomes with those in 2007, when unemployment fell to its lowest level after the 2001 recession.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "the unemployment rate for workers older than 55 was 7.0 percent in December 2009, below the national average for all workers. Of all older workers, both employed and unemployed, only 2.1 percent have been out of work for a year or longer, also below the national...

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "the unemployment rate for workers older than 55 was 7.0 percent in December 2009, below the national average for all workers. Of all older workers, both employed and unemployed, only 2.1 percent have been out of work for a year or longer, also below the national average for all workers." (p. 4)

Pew Economic Policy Group. (2010). A year or more: The high cost of long-term unemployment. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/uploadedFiles/wwwpewtrustsorg/Reports/Economic_Mobility/PEW-Unemployment%20Final.pdf

Pew calculations are based on data from the Current population survey in December 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among unemployed people between the ages of 20 and 24, only 18 percent had been out of work for a year or longer in December 2009. The percentage steadily increases with age: more than 29 percent of unemployed people older than 55 had been out of work for a...

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among unemployed people between the ages of 20 and 24, only 18 percent had been out of work for a year or longer in December 2009. The percentage steadily increases with age: more than 29 percent of unemployed people older than 55 had been out of work for a year or more -- a higher rate than any younger age group." (p. 4)

Pew Economic Policy Group. (2010). A year or more: The high cost of long-term unemployment. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/uploadedFiles/wwwpewtrustsorg/Reports/Economic_Mobility/PEW-Unemployment%20Final.pdf

Pew calculations are based on data from the Current population survey in December 2009.

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adult who were unemployed during the recession, "a majority of the long-term unemployed (56%) say their family income has declined during the recession, compared with 42% who were out of work less than three months and 26% of adults who have not been unemployed since...

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adult who were unemployed during the recession, "a majority of the long-term unemployed (56%) say their family income has declined during the recession, compared with 42% who were out of work less than three months and 26% of adults who have not been unemployed since the recession began in December 2007. " (p. 2)

Morin, R., & Kochbar, R. (2010). The impact of long-term unemployment: Lost income, lost friends--and loss of self-respect. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/760-recession.pdf

Survey results for this report are based on telephone interviews conducted in May 2010 with a sample of 810 people ages 18 to 64 living in the continental United States who were unemployed at some point during the recession. A total of 446 interviews were completed with respondents who are currently unemployed and 364 interviews were conducted of those who are currently working but were unemployed at some point during the recession.

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, nearly half (46%) of those unemployed six months or more say joblessness has strained family relations, compared with 39% of those who were out of work for less than three months. At the same time, more than four-in-ten...

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, nearly half (46%) of those unemployed six months or more say joblessness has strained family relations, compared with 39% of those who were out of work for less than three months. At the same time, more than four-in-ten (43%) long-term unemployed say they lost contact with close friends." (p. 2)

Morin, R., & Kochbar, R. (2010). The impact of long-term unemployment: Lost income, lost friends--and loss of self-respect. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/760-recession.pdf

Survey results for this report are based on telephone interviews conducted in May 2010 with a sample of 810 people ages 18 to 64 living in the continental United States who were unemployed at some point during the recession. A total of 446 interviews were completed with respondents who are currently unemployed and 364 interviews were conducted of those who are currently working but were unemployed at some point during the recession.

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, "nearly four-in-ten (38%) long-term unemployed report they have lost some self-respect while out of work, compared with 29% who were jobless for shorter periods of time. The long-term unemployed also are significantly...

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, "nearly four-in-ten (38%) long-term unemployed report they have lost some self-respect while out of work, compared with 29% who were jobless for shorter periods of time. The long-term unemployed also are significantly more likely to say they sought professional help for depression or other emotional issues while out of work (24% vs. 10% for those unemployed less than three months) (p. 2)

Morin, R., & Kochbar, R. (2010). The impact of long-term unemployment: Lost income, lost friends--and loss of self-respect. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/760-recession.pdf

Survey results for this report are based on telephone interviews conducted in May 2010 with a sample of 810 people ages 18 to 64 living in the continental United States who were unemployed at some point during the recession. A total of 446 interviews were completed with respondents who are currently unemployed and 364 interviews were conducted of those who are currently working but were unemployed at some point during the recession.

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, "nearly seven-in-ten (68%) long-term unemployed say they changed their careers or job fields or seriously thought about doing so, compared with less than half of those (45%) who had been out of work less than three months....

According to a 2010 Pew survey of adults who were unemployed during the recession, "nearly seven-in-ten (68%) long-term unemployed say they changed their careers or job fields or seriously thought about doing so, compared with less than half of those (45%) who had been out of work less than three months. The long-term unemployed also were more likely to pursue job retraining programs or other educational opportunities while out of work (43% among those unemployed six or more months vs. 25% of those unemployed less than three months)." (p. 10)

Morin, R., & Kochbar, R. (2010). The impact of long-term unemployment: Lost income, lost friends--and loss of self-respect. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/760-recession.pdf

Survey results for this report are based on telephone interviews conducted in May 2010 with a sample of 810 people ages 18 to 64 living in the continental United States who were unemployed at some point during the recession. A total of 446 interviews were completed with respondents who are currently unemployed and 364 interviews were conducted of those who are currently working but were unemployed at some point during the recession.

According to a 2010 Pew survey, among workers who were unemployed for some period during the recession but are now re-employed, "more than half (53%) of those who were out of work for less than six months say their current job is better than their old one compared with 36% of those who were unemployed...

According to a 2010 Pew survey, among workers who were unemployed for some period during the recession but are now re-employed, "more than half (53%) of those who were out of work for less than six months say their current job is better than their old one compared with 36% of those who were unemployed six months or longer."

Morin, R. (2010). Back at work but...most ‘re-employed’ workers say they’re overqualified for their new job. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/763-re-employed-workers.pdf

This report is based on data from telephone interviews conducted May 11-31, 2010. 2,967 interviews, including 376 with adults working full- or part-time at the time of the survey who were unemployed at some point since the recession began in December, 2007.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among the unemployed, older workers were more likely than younger workers to be out of work for more than 99 weeks (10.7% of unemployed workers ages 45 and older, compared to 6.0% of unemployed workers under the age of 35." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "among the unemployed, older workers were more likely than younger workers to be out of work for more than 99 weeks (10.7% of unemployed workers ages 45 and older, compared to 6.0% of unemployed workers under the age of 35." (p. 1)

Mayer, G. (2010, December 10). The trend in long-term unemployment and characteristics of workers unemployed for more than 99 weeks. (CRS Report for Congress No. R41559). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41559.pdf

The analysis in this report is based on data from the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a household survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor.

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "during the period from October 2009 to September 2010, unemployed workers were more likely to be younger, but older unemployed workers were more likely to be out of work for more than 99 weeks. Almost half (48.7%) of unemployed workers were under the age of...

According to a 2010 analysis of CPS data, "during the period from October 2009 to September 2010, unemployed workers were more likely to be younger, but older unemployed workers were more likely to be out of work for more than 99 weeks. Almost half (48.7%) of unemployed workers were under the age of 35, compared to 34.0% of employed workers. On the other hand, 44.4% of workers unemployed for more than 99 weeks were 45 or older. Similarly, workers ages 45 and older were more likely than younger workers to be unemployed for more than 99 weeks. An estimated 10.7% of unemployed workers ages 45 and older were unemployed for more than 99 weeks, compared to 6.0% of unemployed workers under the age of 35." (p. 12)

Mayer, G. (2010, December 10). The trend in long-term unemployment and characteristics of workers unemployed for more than 99 weeks. (CRS Report for Congress No. R41559). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41559.pdf

The analysis in this report is based on data from the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS is a household survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor.

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