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According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "roughly half of employees remain unsatisfied with their finances and almost 3 in 5 are worried about their financial future."

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "roughly half of employees remain unsatisfied with their finances and almost 3 in 5 are worried about their financial future."

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, among those workers who report their health status as "very good", 52% are worried about their future financial state, compared to 63% of those who rate their health as "good" and 72% of those in fair...

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, among those workers who report their health status as "very good", 52% are worried about their future financial state, compared to 63% of those who rate their health as "good" and 72% of those in fair health or worse. (fig. 3)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "retirement confidence climbed between 2009 and 2013, and nearly 1/4 of employees are now 'very confident' of having enough income for the first 15 years of retirement". (fig. 4)

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "retirement confidence climbed between 2009 and 2013, and nearly 1/4 of employees are now 'very confident' of having enough income for the first 15 years of retirement". (fig. 4)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, although nearly 25% of the respondents are confident in having enough income for the first 15 years of retirement, after 25 years of retiring "only 8% remain confident of a financially comfortable retirement"...Among...

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, although nearly 25% of the respondents are confident in having enough income for the first 15 years of retirement, after 25 years of retiring "only 8% remain confident of a financially comfortable retirement"...Among those aged 50+, "in 2007, 34% were very confident of their ability to afford the first 15 years of retirement, compared with only 24% in 2013". (fig. 4 and 5)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, reducing debt has become increasingly important to workers recently. "More employees are spending less and postponing big purchases, up from 49% in 2011 to 56% in 2013". (fig. 7)

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, reducing debt has become increasingly important to workers recently. "More employees are spending less and postponing big purchases, up from 49% in 2011 to 56% in 2013". (fig. 7)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, 43% plan on retiring later than previously planned [43%], while 45% report no change and 12% plan to retire earlier. "A large majority of these employees expect to delay retirement by 3 or more years,...

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, 43% plan on retiring later than previously planned [43%], while 45% report no change and 12% plan to retire earlier. "A large majority of these employees expect to delay retirement by 3 or more years, and 44% plan on a delay of 5 years or more". (Fig. 13 and 14)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, among those employees who report that they plan to delay their retirement, 57% report that they are in poor health and 59% report high stress levels. (Fig. 13)

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, among those employees who report that they plan to delay their retirement, 57% report that they are in poor health and 59% report high stress levels. (Fig. 13)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "in 2009, 31% of workers planned on retiring before age 65 and 41% planned on retiring after 65. In 2013, only 25% of workers planned on retiring before 65 and half expected to retire after 65." (fig....

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, "in 2009, 31% of workers planned on retiring before age 65 and 41% planned on retiring after 65. In 2013, only 25% of workers planned on retiring before 65 and half expected to retire after 65." (fig. 15)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, more than three-quarters of employees (76%) say their employer recently enacted significant changes that could compromise their near-term or long-term financial security. These changes includes layoffs...

According to a 2013 Towers Watson survey of over 4000 retirement plan participants working full-time, more than three-quarters of employees (76%) say their employer recently enacted significant changes that could compromise their near-term or long-term financial security. These changes includes layoffs (47%), increased health care premiums or out-of-pocket costs (38%); cut or changed retirement benefits (24%). (fig. 1)

Gardner, J., & Nyce, S. (2014). Workers still uneasy about financial security and retirement. Results from Towers Watson's 2013/2014 Global Benefit Attitudes Survey. U. S.: Towers Watson. Retrieved from http://www.towerswatson.com/en/Insights/Newsletters/Americas/Insider/2014/workers-still-uneasy-about-financial-security-and-retirement

This Towers Watson study surveyed 5,070 U.S. respondents employed by nongovernment organizations with 1,000 or more employees. The findings in this article reflect responses from 4,248 retirement plan participants working full-time. All results are weighted by age, gender and salary to the national average of similar workers.

According to the 2014 National Study of Employers, "employers with 50 or more employees are most likely (96%) to offer 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans, with for-profit employers using the former and nonprofits the latter (Table 21). Moreover, 80% of employers make contributions to employees' individual...

According to the 2014 National Study of Employers, "employers with 50 or more employees are most likely (96%) to offer 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans, with for-profit employers using the former and nonprofits the latter (Table 21). Moreover, 80% of employers make contributions to employees' individual retirement plans. Defined-benefit pension plans continue to decline. Employers offering defined-benefit pension plans have declined from 26% in 2008 to 21% in 2014." (Table 22 and p. 10)

Matos, K., & Galinsky, E. (2014). 2014 National Study of Employers. New York: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://www.familiesandwork.org/2014-national-study-of-employers/

The 2014 NSE sample includes 1,051 employers with 50 or more employees; 67% are for-profit employers and 33% are nonprofit organizations; 39% operate at only one location, while 61% percent have operations at more than one location. Families and Work Institute (FWI) designed the questionnaire, and Harris Interactive, Inc. conducted the interviews on behalf of FWI.

According to a 2014 analysis of data from four major household surveys, "at any given point, only about half of private sector wage and salary workers age 25-64 participate in any retirement plan. About 65 percent may have access to a plan through their current employer." (p. 1)

According to a 2014 analysis of data from four major household surveys, "at any given point, only about half of private sector wage and salary workers age 25-64 participate in any retirement plan. About 65 percent may have access to a plan through their current employer." (p. 1)

Munnell, A. H., & Bleckman, D. (2014). Is pension coverage a problem in the private sector? (Issue Brief No. 14-7-508). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/IB_14-7-508.pdf

This analysis compares four major household data sets that provide information about pension coverage: the Current Population Survey, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Survey of Consumer Finances, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

According to a 2014 analysis of data from four major household surveys, “about 50 percent of private sector workers participate in a retirement plan…[But], roughly one-third of households reach their sixties with no retirement plan at all.” (p. 5)

According to a 2014 analysis of data from four major household surveys, “about 50 percent of private sector workers participate in a retirement plan…[But], roughly one-third of households reach their sixties with no retirement plan at all.” (p. 5)

Munnell, A. H., & Bleckman, D. (2014). Is pension coverage a problem in the private sector? (Issue Brief No. 14-7-508). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/IB_14-7-508.pdf

This analysis compares four major household data sets that provide information about pension coverage: the Current Population Survey, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Survey of Consumer Finances, and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

According to a 2014 report from Aon Hewitt, when asked about their retirement plan initiatives for 2014, 6% of US employers report that they are very likely to evaluate phased retirement alternatives, while 20% report that they are somewhat likely to do so. Others say that they are somewhat unikely...

According to a 2014 report from Aon Hewitt, when asked about their retirement plan initiatives for 2014, 6% of US employers report that they are very likely to evaluate phased retirement alternatives, while 20% report that they are somewhat likely to do so. Others say that they are somewhat unikely (44%) or very unlikely (30%) to evaluate phased retirement alternatives for their employees. (p. 11)

AonHewitt. (2014). 2014 hot topics in retirement: Building a strategic focus. US: AonHewitt. Retrieved from http://www.aon.com/attachments/human-capital-consulting/2014_Hot-Topics-Retirement_Report_vFinal%281%29.pdf

 In the fall of 2013, Aon Hewitt surveyed HR professionals throughout the U.S. to learn what's likely to occur in the coming year regarding the design, management and delivery of their retirement programs--spanning both defined contribution and defined benefit plans. Included in this report are responses from more than 400 employers representing nearly 10 million employees.

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, retirement confidence was "strongly correlated with household participation in a retirement plan (including an individual retirement account (IRA)). Nearly half of workers without a retirement plan were not at all confident about their financial security...

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, retirement confidence was "strongly correlated with household participation in a retirement plan (including an individual retirement account (IRA)). Nearly half of workers without a retirement plan were not at all confident about their financial security in retirement, compared with only about 1 in 10 with a plan."

Helman, R., Adams, N., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2014). The 2014 retirement confidence survey: Confidence Rebounds--for those with retirement plans. (Issue Brief No. 397). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/surveys/rcs/2014/EBRI_IB_397_Mar14.RCS.pdf

These findings are part of the 24th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey was conducted in January 2014 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,501 individuals (1,000 workers and 501 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States. Random-digit dialing was used to obtain a representative cross section of the U.S. population. To further increase representation, a cell phone supplement was added to the sample.

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, "64 percent of workers report they or their spouse have saved for retirement (statistically equivalent to 66 percent in 2013), although nearly 8 in 10 (79 percent) full-time workers say that they or their spouse have done so. Here again, participation...

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, "64 percent of workers report they or their spouse have saved for retirement (statistically equivalent to 66 percent in 2013), although nearly 8 in 10 (79 percent) full-time workers say that they or their spouse have done so. Here again, participation in a retirement plan mattered: 90 percent of workers participating in a retirement plan had saved for retirement, compared with just 1 in 5 of those without a retirement plan."

Helman, R., Adams, N., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2014). The 2014 retirement confidence survey: Confidence Rebounds--for those with retirement plans. (Issue Brief No. 397). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/surveys/rcs/2014/EBRI_IB_397_Mar14.RCS.pdf

These findings are part of the 24th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey was conducted in January 2014 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,501 individuals (1,000 workers and 501 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States. Random-digit dialing was used to obtain a representative cross section of the U.S. population. To further increase representation, a cell phone supplement was added to the sample.

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, "among RCS workers who provided information on their retirement savings, 36 percent say they have less than $1,000 (up from 28 percent in 2013)... those who indicate they and their spouse do not have a retirement plan (either an IRA, defined contribution,...

According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, "among RCS workers who provided information on their retirement savings, 36 percent say they have less than $1,000 (up from 28 percent in 2013)... those who indicate they and their spouse do not have a retirement plan (either an IRA, defined contribution, or defined benefit plan) are far more likely than those who have a plan to be in this group (73 percent vs. 11 percent). Moreover, 68 percent with household income of less than $35,000 a year have savings of less than $1,000. Of those who have saved for retirement, only 38 percent report savings of less than $25,000."

Helman, R., Adams, N., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2014). The 2014 retirement confidence survey: Confidence Rebounds--for those with retirement plans. (Issue Brief No. 397). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/surveys/rcs/2014/EBRI_IB_397_Mar14.RCS.pdf

These findings are part of the 24th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey was conducted in January 2014 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,501 individuals (1,000 workers and 501 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States. Random-digit dialing was used to obtain a representative cross section of the U.S. population. To further increase representation, a cell phone supplement was added to the sample.

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "believes nearly half their retirement income will come from pensions, 401(k)s and other retirement plans, with only one-third from Social Security and 21% from savings and investments." (p.5)

According to a 2013 MetLife study, the average Generation X member (Americans born 1965 to 1976) "believes nearly half their retirement income will come from pensions, 401(k)s and other retirement plans, with only one-third from Social Security and 21% from savings and investments." (p.5)

MetLife. (2013). The MetLife study of gen X: The MTV generation moves into mid-life. New York: Metlife Mature Market Institute. Retrieved from https://www.metlife.com/assets/cao/mmi/publications/studies/2013/mmi-gen-x.pdf

This study marks a first broad examination of Generation X, establishing a baseline of their current work and retirement plans, finances and housing,family life and their views about their health, aging and generational identity.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, of those who report that financial need is not an important factor in their retirement plans, "58% say it is unlikely they will work after retirement compared with 28% of those who do consider financial need...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, of those who report that financial need is not an important factor in their retirement plans, "58% say it is unlikely they will work after retirement compared with 28% of those who do consider financial need a factor in their retirement decision. Similarly, 46% of individuals who say that employer-sponsored benefits are not an important factor in their decision on when to retire report that they are unlikely to work during retirement, compared with 29% for whom employer benefits are an important factor in their retirement decision". (p.2)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities...

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, "74% of Americans age 50 and older state that they have given their retirement years some or a great deal of thought. Financial need is the most commonly cited factor in deciding when to retire (69%). Majorities also cite their health (65%), the need for benefits through an employer such as health insurance (61%), ability to do the job (58%), and job satisfaction (54%) as extremely or very important factors in their decision. Wanting more free time and the retirement plans of spouses and partners are viewed as less important factors (with 38 and 37% respectively designated as very or extremely important)." (p.7)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 12% of people 50 or older who do not consider themselves retired had to borrow money from their retirement plan in the past year and "are much more likely to feel anxious (70%) than secure (12%)." (p.8)

According to a 2013 survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 12% of people 50 or older who do not consider themselves retired had to borrow money from their retirement plan in the past year and "are much more likely to feel anxious (70%) than secure (12%)." (p.8)

Benz, J., Sedensky, M., Tompson, T., & Agiesta, J. (2013). Working longer: Older Americans' attitudes on work and retirement. The Associated Press and NORC. Retrieved from http://www.apnorc.org/projects/Pages/working-longer-older-americans-attitudes-on-work-and-retirement.aspx

With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted a national survey of 1,024 adults ages 50 and over. This survey illuminates a slow-moving shift in the American idea of retirement.

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "employers offering defined-benefit pension plans have declined from 34% in 2005 to 22% in 2012. However, employers are now more likely to contribute to employees' retirement plans (up to 83% in 2012 from 74% in 2005)." (p. 7)

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "employers offering defined-benefit pension plans have declined from 34% in 2005 to 22% in 2012. However, employers are now more likely to contribute to employees' retirement plans (up to 83% in 2012 from 74% in 2005)." (p. 7)

Matos, K., & Galinski, E. (2012). 2012 National Study of Employers . New York, NY: Familes and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/NSE_2012.pdf

The 2012 NSE sample includes 1,126 employers with 50 or more employees--75% are for-profit employers and 25% are nonprofit organizations; 18% operate at only one location, while 82% percent have operations at more than one location. The results of the survey are being released with the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) as an integral part of the FWI-SHRM When Work Works initiative.

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "employers in 2012 are less likely (22%) than those in 2005 (34%) to provide defined-benefit pension plans or assistance in obtaining public benefits (20% in 2005 compared with 15% in 2012). However, employers in 2012 are more likely (96%) than employers...

According to the 2012 National Study of Employers, "employers in 2012 are less likely (22%) than those in 2005 (34%) to provide defined-benefit pension plans or assistance in obtaining public benefits (20% in 2005 compared with 15% in 2012). However, employers in 2012 are more likely (96%) than employers in 2005 (83%) to provide 401(k), 403(b) or other retirement plans. They are also more likely (83%) than employers in 2005 (74%) to make contributions to employees' retirement plans." (p. 36)

Matos, K., & Galinski, E. (2012). 2012 national study of employers. New York, NY: Familes and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/NSE_2012.pdf

The 2012 NSE sample includes 1,126 employers with 50 or more employees--75% are for-profit employers and 25% are nonprofit organizations; 18% operate at only one location, while 82% percent have operations at more than one location. The results of the survey are being released with the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) as an integral part of the FWI-SHRM When Work Works initiative.

According to a 2012 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "nearly two-thirds of private industry workers had access to some form of retirement plan, typically either a defined-benefit plan (such as a pension) or defined-contribution plan (such as a 401(k)), and 48 percent chose to participate...

According to a 2012 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "nearly two-thirds of private industry workers had access to some form of retirement plan, typically either a defined-benefit plan (such as a pension) or defined-contribution plan (such as a 401(k)), and 48 percent chose to participate in a retirement benefit plan."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Who has benefits in private industry in 2012? Beyond the Numbers, 1(13) Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-1/who-has-benefits-in-private-industry-in-2012.htm

The estimates of private industry benefit access, participation, and share of medical care premiums in this issue are from the National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States--March 2012.

According to a 2012 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "access to retirement plans varied significantly by major occupational group, full- or part-time status, bargaining status, and wage category. Management, professional, and related occupations had nearly twice the access rate and more...

According to a 2012 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "access to retirement plans varied significantly by major occupational group, full- or part-time status, bargaining status, and wage category. Management, professional, and related occupations had nearly twice the access rate and more than 3 times the participation rate of service occupations. Similarly, full-time workers had nearly twice the access rate and 3 times the participation rate of part-time workers. Union workers showed very high access (92 percent) and participation (85 percent) rates for retirement plans".

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2012). Who has benefits in private industry in 2012? Beyond the Numbers, 1(13) Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-1/who-has-benefits-in-private-industry-in-2012.htm

The estimates of private industry benefit access, participation, and share of medical care premiums in this issue are from the National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States--March 2012.

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "many organizations offer retirement plans to help employees plan for their financial future. Overall, defined contribution retirement plans (92%) were the most common type of plan offered, followed by Roth 401(k) savings plans (34%), traditional...

According to the 2012 EBRI Employee Benefits survey, "many organizations offer retirement plans to help employees plan for their financial future. Overall, defined contribution retirement plans (92%) were the most common type of plan offered, followed by Roth 401(k) savings plans (34%), traditional defined benefit pension plans (21%) and cash balance pension plans (6%)." (p. 22)

SHRM. (2012). 2012 employee benefits report: The employee benefits landscape in a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/research/surveyfindings/articles/documents/2012_empbenefits_report.pdf

In January 2012, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,500 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, approximately 3,200 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 550 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "employed Black workers lag slightly behind employed whites in terms of the share of full-time workers who work for employers that offer a retirement plan (62.4 percent vs. 68.5 percent). Employed Latino workers are most disadvantaged in...

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "employed Black workers lag slightly behind employed whites in terms of the share of full-time workers who work for employers that offer a retirement plan (62.4 percent vs. 68.5 percent). Employed Latino workers are most disadvantaged in terms of workplace retirement plan access (43.1 percent)."

Rhee, N. (2012). Black and Latino retirement (in)security. Berkeley, Ca: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. Retrieved from http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/research/retirement_in_security2012.pdf

Unpublished data originally generated for S. Allegretto, N. Rhee, J. Saad-Lessler, and L. Schmitz, 2011, “California Workers’ Retirement Prospects,” in N. Rhee (ed.,) Meeting California’s Retirement Security Challenge, UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. URL: http://laborcenter.berkeley. edu/research/CAretirement_challenge_1011.pdf.

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "less than half of Black workers (47.7 percent) and less than a third of Latino workers (31.6 percent) in full-time jobs participate in an employer sponsored retirement plan."

According to a 2012 analysis of Current Population Survey data, "less than half of Black workers (47.7 percent) and less than a third of Latino workers (31.6 percent) in full-time jobs participate in an employer sponsored retirement plan."

Rhee, N. (2012). Black and Latino retirement (in)security. Berkeley, Ca: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. Retrieved from http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/research/retirement_in_security2012.pdf

Unpublished data originally generated for S. Allegretto, N. Rhee, J. Saad-Lessler, and L. Schmitz, 2011, “California Workers’ Retirement Prospects,” in N. Rhee (ed.,) Meeting California’s Retirement Security Challenge, UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education. URL: http://laborcenter.berkeley. edu/research/CAretirement_challenge_1011.pdf.

According to a 2011 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "64 percent of all private industry employees had access to retirement benefits, compared with 90 percent of state and local government employees. Eighty-five percent of state and local government employees actually participated in...

According to a 2011 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "64 percent of all private industry employees had access to retirement benefits, compared with 90 percent of state and local government employees. Eighty-five percent of state and local government employees actually participated in a retirement plan, compared with 49 percent of private industry workers."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2011). Employee benefits in the united states -- march 2011. Retrieved July 26, 2011, from http://bls.gov/news.release/ebs2.nr0.htm

These data are from the National Compensation Survey (NCS), which provides comprehensive measures of compensation cost trends and incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans.

According to a 2010 BLS report, "thirty-one percent of civilian workers in the lowest 10 percent of the national earnings range had access to defined-contribution retirement plans, compared with 68 percent of workers in the highest 10-percent earnings category." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 BLS report, "thirty-one percent of civilian workers in the lowest 10 percent of the national earnings range had access to defined-contribution retirement plans, compared with 68 percent of workers in the highest 10-percent earnings category." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on benefits by wage level (Vol. 2, Issue No. 1). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue1.pdf

This report is based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2009.

According to a 2010 BLS report, for employees eligible to participate in a defined-contribution retirement plan, "13 percent of the lowest paid workers participated, compared with 55 percent for the highest paid workers." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 BLS report, for employees eligible to participate in a defined-contribution retirement plan, "13 percent of the lowest paid workers participated, compared with 55 percent for the highest paid workers." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on benefits by wage level (Vol. 2, Issue No. 1). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue1.pdf

This report is based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "two percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families headed by individuals without a high school diploma. The share for families with a head having only a high school diploma increased to 12.2 percent....

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "two percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families headed by individuals without a high school diploma. The share for families with a head having only a high school diploma increased to 12.2 percent. Approximately 75 percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families whose head was a college graduate." (p. 3-4)

Copeland, C. (2010). Total individual account retirement plan assets, by demographics, 2007, with market adjustments to March 2010 (EBRI Notes, Vol. 31 No. 5). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_05-May10.IAs.pdf

This article examines the distribution of total assets held in individual account retirement plans (401(k)-type plans, IRAs, and Keogh plans) across various demographic characteristics of American families, based on the latest data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "1.2 percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families with family income below $20,000, 15.1 percent for families with family incomes of $100,000-$149,999, and 49.9 percent for families with family...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "1.2 percent of individual account retirement plan assets were owned by families with family income below $20,000, 15.1 percent for families with family incomes of $100,000-$149,999, and 49.9 percent for families with family incomes of $150,000 or more. The families in the top 10 percentile of net worth owned 59.6 percent of individual account retirement plan assets, compared with 0.5 percent of those in the bottom 25 percent of net worth." (p. 4)

Copeland, C. (2010). Total individual account retirement plan assets, by demographics, 2007, with market adjustments to March 2010 (EBRI Notes, Vol. 31 No. 5). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_05-May10.IAs.pdf

This article examines the distribution of total assets held in individual account retirement plans (401(k)-type plans, IRAs, and Keogh plans) across various demographic characteristics of American families, based on the latest data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "approximately 70 percent of the employment-based retirement plan assets were held by families headed by individuals ages 45-64. The largest concentration of IRA and Keogh assets is held by families with heads in the next oldest...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "approximately 70 percent of the employment-based retirement plan assets were held by families headed by individuals ages 45-64. The largest concentration of IRA and Keogh assets is held by families with heads in the next oldest age group (ages 55-74), who own just over 60 percent of these assets....just less than 90 percent of individual account retirement plan assets were held by families headed by white, non-Hispanic individuals." (p. 2)

Copeland, C. (2010). Total individual account retirement plan assets, by demographics, 2007, with market adjustments to March 2010 (EBRI Notes, Vol. 31 No. 5). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_05-May10.IAs.pdf

This article examines the distribution of total assets held in individual account retirement plans (401(k)-type plans, IRAs, and Keogh plans) across various demographic characteristics of American families, based on the latest data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances.

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "twenty percent of private industry workers and 79 percent of State and local government workers participated in a defined benefit retirement plan in March 2009. Of those that participated in defined benefit plans, 19 percent of private...

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "twenty percent of private industry workers and 79 percent of State and local government workers participated in a defined benefit retirement plan in March 2009. Of those that participated in defined benefit plans, 19 percent of private industry workers and 10 percent of State and local government workers were in frozen plans. [Frozen plans are those that are closed to employees not previously participating in the plan and/or place limits on future benefits for some or all active participants.] The remaining 81 percent of private industry defined-benefit planparticipants and 90 percent of State and local government definedbenefit plan participants were in open plans, which are active plans available to current and new employees." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on defined-benefit plans: "frozen" defined-benefit plans (Program Perspectives, Vol 2 No. 3). Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue3.pdf

These results are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefi ts in the United States, March 2009,

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about 64 percent of both full- and part-time civilian employees in the United States have access to both an employer-sponsored medical care plan and an employer-sponsored retirement plan. Another 15 percent of civilian...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about 64 percent of both full- and part-time civilian employees in the United States have access to both an employer-sponsored medical care plan and an employer-sponsored retirement plan. Another 15 percent of civilian employees have access to either a medical care plan or a retirement plan but not both. The remaining 20 percent of civilian employees have access to neither a medical care plan nor a retirement plan." (p. 1)

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on combined benefit plans (Program Perspectives, Vol. 2, issue No. 4). Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue4.pdf

These statistics are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about 86 percent of employees in establishments with 500 or more workers have access to both medical care and retirement plans, while about 40 percent of workers in establishments with 1-49 workers have similar access....

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about 86 percent of employees in establishments with 500 or more workers have access to both medical care and retirement plans, while about 40 percent of workers in establishments with 1-49 workers have similar access. About one third of employees in establishments with 1-49 employees do not have access to either retirement or medical care plans, while 7 percent of employees in establishments with 500 or more employees do not have access to either benefit." (p. 2)

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on combined benefit plans (Program Perspectives, Vol. 2, issue No. 4). Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue4.pdf

These statistics are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about one in three civilian workers in the lowest 25th percentile of earnings have access to both medical care benefits and a retirement plan, while access to both benefits ranges from 67 percent to 86 percent for workers...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the BLS National Compensation Survey, "about one in three civilian workers in the lowest 25th percentile of earnings have access to both medical care benefits and a retirement plan, while access to both benefits ranges from 67 percent to 86 percent for workers in the highest three quartiles." (p. 3)

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Program perspectives on combined benefit plans (Program Perspectives, Vol. 2, issue No. 4). Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/program_perspectives_vol2_issue4.pdf

These statistics are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "among older workers, 40% rated their financial situation as poor, and 61% said they have adjusted their plans for retirement. Almost the same percentage of younger workers (39%) also rated their financial situation as poor,...

According to a 2010 analysis of data from a survey of unemployed job seekers, "among older workers, 40% rated their financial situation as poor, and 61% said they have adjusted their plans for retirement. Almost the same percentage of younger workers (39%) also rated their financial situation as poor, but a smaller percentage of them have changed retirement plans (43%). (p. 13)

Heidkamp, M., Corre, N., & Van Horn, C. (2010). The new unemployables: Older job seekers struggle to find work during the great recession--comparing the job search, financial, and emotional experiences of older and younger unemployed Americans. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging & Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/research_sites/agingandwork/pdf/publications/IB25_NewUnemployed.pdf

The March 2010 survey reinterviewed 908 of the 1,202 individuals who had been part of a nationally representative August 2009 survey of people who lost jobs during the prior year.

According to a 2010 report of a survey of 950 small and large employers, "637 (67%) of the establishments indicated that that phased retirement would be feasible for a generic white collar worker, and another 142 (15%) of the establishments said that phased retirementwas possible in some cases." In...

According to a 2010 report of a survey of 950 small and large employers, "637 (67%) of the establishments indicated that that phased retirement would be feasible for a generic white collar worker, and another 142 (15%) of the establishments said that phased retirementwas possible in some cases." In most of these establishments, the employer has in mind an informal arrangement that is negotiated with an individual worker and that occurs before official retirement. Formal phased retirement plans are rare, especially in small organizations." (p. 1011)

Hutchens, R. (2010). Worker characteristics, job characteristics, and opportunities for phased retirement. Labour Economics, 17(6), 1010-1021.

The data are based on a stratified random sample of 950 establishments drawn from Dun and Bradstreet's Strategic Marketing Record for December 2000. The survey was executed by the University of Massachusetts Center for Survey Research between June 2001 and November 2002.

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey, "97% of companies offered at least one retirement plan. Overall, defined contribution retirement plans (92%) were most common type of plan offered, followed by Roth 401(k) savings plans (28%), traditional defined benefit pension plans (27%) and cash...

According to the 2010 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey, "97% of companies offered at least one retirement plan. Overall, defined contribution retirement plans (92%) were most common type of plan offered, followed by Roth 401(k) savings plans (28%), traditional defined benefit pension plans (27%) and cash balance pension plans (9%). In addition, 11% offered supplemental executive retirement plans (SERPs)." (p. 18)

Society for Human Resource Management. (2010). 2010 employee benefits: Examining employee benefits in the midst of a recovering economy. Alexandria, VA: Society for Human Resource Management. Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/10-0280%20Employee%20Benefits%20Survey%20Report-FNL.pdf

In February 2010, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted its annual survey to gather information on the types of benefits employers offer to their employees. In February 2010, an e-mail that included a hyperlink to the Employee Benefits Survey was sent to 3,000 randomly selected SHRM members. Of these, 2,850 e-mails were successfully delivered to respondents, and 534 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 19%.

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "among full-time, full-year wage and salary workers ages 21-64, 54.4 percent participated in a retirement plan in 2009,...down almost 6 percentage points from the high of 60.4 percent measured in 1999." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "among full-time, full-year wage and salary workers ages 21-64, 54.4 percent participated in a retirement plan in 2009,...down almost 6 percentage points from the high of 60.4 percent measured in 1999." (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2010). Employment-based retirement plan participation: Geographic differences and trends, 2009. (Issue Brief No. 348). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=4663

This Issue Brief closely examines the level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS), the most recent data currently available (for 2009).

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "among all workers (including those who are not offered a retirement plan at work), 39.6 percent participated in a retirement plan in 2009, the first time in 15 years it dropped below 40 percent." (p. 1)

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "among all workers (including those who are not offered a retirement plan at work), 39.6 percent participated in a retirement plan in 2009, the first time in 15 years it dropped below 40 percent." (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2010). Employment-based retirement plan participation: Geographic differences and trends, 2009. (Issue Brief No. 348). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=4663

This Issue Brief closely examines the level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS), the most recent data currently available (for 2009).

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "participation [in an employment-based retirement plan]increases with age (61.2 percent for wage and salary workers ages 55-64, compared with 30.6 percent for those ages 21-24). (p. 1)

According to a 2010 EBRI report, "participation [in an employment-based retirement plan]increases with age (61.2 percent for wage and salary workers ages 55-64, compared with 30.6 percent for those ages 21-24). (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2010). Employment-based retirement plan participation: Geographic differences and trends, 2009. (Issue Brief No. 348). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=4663

This Issue Brief closely examines the level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS), the most recent data currently available (for 2009).

According to a 2010 analysis of retirement survey data, when workers were asked how they might respond to the economic downturn, about 32 percent of respondents reported that they plan to work longer, while 10 percent reported that they have increased or intend to increase their savings [contributions...

According to a 2010 analysis of retirement survey data, when workers were asked how they might respond to the economic downturn, about 32 percent of respondents reported that they plan to work longer, while 10 percent reported that they have increased or intend to increase their savings [contributions to retirement plans]; 8 percent reported that they will take both actions, and 50% plan to do neither of those actions. (fig. 1, p. 1)

Coe, N. B., & Haverstick, K. (2010). How do responses to the downturn vary by household characteristics? (Issue Brief No. 10-17). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/IB_10-17.pdf

The CRR surveyed 1,317 workers age 45 to 59 between July and August 2009; the group was drawn from a nationally representative panel maintained by Knowledge Networks.

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2010 National Compensation Survey, "employer-provided retirement plans were available to 74 percent of all full-time workers in private industry in March 2010; by contrast, 39 percent of part-time private industry workers had access to a retirement plan."

According to a 2010 analysis of data from the 2010 National Compensation Survey, "employer-provided retirement plans were available to 74 percent of all full-time workers in private industry in March 2010; by contrast, 39 percent of part-time private industry workers had access to a retirement plan."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Access to employer-provided benefits among full- and part-time private industry workers, March 2010.  The editor's desk. Retrieved August 11, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2010/ted_20100806.htm

These data are from the National Compensation Survey, which provides comprehensive measures of occupation earnings, compensation cost trends, and incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans in the United States. A worker with access to a medical or retirement plan is defined as having an employer-provided plan available for use, regardless of whether the worker chooses to enroll or participate in the plan.

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "workers in larger establishments (100 or more workers) were almost 3 times more likely than their counterparts in smaller firms (1 to 99 workers) to work for a company that includes an automatic enrollment provision in its savings...

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "workers in larger establishments (100 or more workers) were almost 3 times more likely than their counterparts in smaller firms (1 to 99 workers) to work for a company that includes an automatic enrollment provision in its savings and thrift retirement plan: 25 percent compared with 9 percent... Among all private industry workers who participated in savings and thrift plans, 19 percent had automatic enrollment in such plans."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2010). Automatic enrollment in savings and thrift retirement plans, March 2009, the editor's desk. Retrieved September 20, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2010/ted_20100915.htm

These data are from the National Compensation Survey and are for March 2009.

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "while 21 percent of private industry workers in the highest wage quartile had employers that automatically enrolled employees in their company's savings and thrift [retirement] plan, only 11 percent of workers in the lowest quartile...

According to a 2010 analysis of National Compensation Survey data, "while 21 percent of private industry workers in the highest wage quartile had employers that automatically enrolled employees in their company's savings and thrift [retirement] plan, only 11 percent of workers in the lowest quartile had this provision available. Workers in larger establishments were almost 3 times more likely than their counterparts in smaller firms to work for a company that includes an automatic enrollment provision in its savings and thrift retirement plan, 25 percent compared with 9 percent."

Celis, J. (2010). Disparities in automatic enrollment plan availability. Retrieved September 9, 2010, from http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc

These data are from the National Compensation Survey and are for March 2009.

A 2009 analysis of the most recent SIPP data [2006] shows that "the sponsorship level for all workers for pay ages 16 and over (defined as the fraction of workers whose employer or union sponsors a pension or retirement plan for any of the employees at the workers' place of employment) was 59 percent...

A 2009 analysis of the most recent SIPP data [2006] shows that "the sponsorship level for all workers for pay ages 16 and over (defined as the fraction of workers whose employer or union sponsors a pension or retirement plan for any of the employees at the workers' place of employment) was 59 percent in 2006.... The percentage of workers participating in a plan regardless of whether the plan was sponsored at the workers' place of employment (the participation level) was 44 percent in 2006. (p. 2)

Copeland, C. (2009). Retirement plan participation: Survey of income and program participation (SIPP) data, 2006. EBRI Notes, 30(2), 1-12. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/notespdf/EBRI_Notes_Feb09.Ret-Partic.pdf

This article presents results from the latest data [2006] from the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) on retirement plan participation.

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates "that 62% of workers under age 65 were employed at jobs that offered some form of employer-sponsored retirement plan in 2007. This figure includes both defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans." (p. 2)

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates "that 62% of workers under age 65 were employed at jobs that offered some form of employer-sponsored retirement plan in 2007. This figure includes both defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans." (p. 2)

Purcell, P. (2009). Retirement savings and household wealth in 2007. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL30922_20090408.pdf

This Congressional Research Service (CRS) report presents data on retirement savings account ownership and retirement account balance collected through the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) in 2001, 2004, and 2007. The SCF is a survey of households sponsored by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in cooperation with the Department of the Treasury.

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "forty-nine percent of workers under age 65 participated in employer-sponsored retirement plans in 2007, little changed from the 48% who participated in employer-sponsored plans in 2004 and the 50% who participated in 2001."...

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "forty-nine percent of workers under age 65 participated in employer-sponsored retirement plans in 2007, little changed from the 48% who participated in employer-sponsored plans in 2004 and the 50% who participated in 2001." (p. 3)

Purcell, P. (2009). Retirement savings and household wealth in 2007. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL30922_20090408.pdf

This Congressional Research Service (CRS) report presents data on retirement savings account ownership and retirement account balance collected through the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) in 2001, 2004, and 2007. The SCF is a survey of households sponsored by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in cooperation with the Department of the Treasury.

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "workers at large firms were much more likely to have been offered a retirement plan than those employed at small firms. In 2007, 77% of workers employed at firms with 100 to 499 employees, and 88% of workers employed at firms...

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "workers at large firms were much more likely to have been offered a retirement plan than those employed at small firms. In 2007, 77% of workers employed at firms with 100 to 499 employees, and 88% of workers employed at firms with 500 or more employees, worked for employers that offered a retirement plan of some kind. In contrast, just 15% of employees at firms with fewer than 20 employees worked for employers that offered a retirement plan in 2007. This represents a substantial drop from 2001, when 22% of employees at firms with fewer than 20 employees worked at firms that offered a retirement plan." (p. 3)

Purcell, P. (2009). Retirement savings and household wealth in 2007. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL30922_20090408.pdf

This Congressional Research Service (CRS) report presents data on retirement savings account ownership and retirement account balance collected through the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) in 2001, 2004, and 2007. The SCF is a survey of households sponsored by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in cooperation with the Department of the Treasury.

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "full-time workers were much more likely than part-time workers to have been offered the opportunity to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. In 2007, 66% of full-time workers were offered a retirement plan at...

A 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances indicates that "full-time workers were much more likely than part-time workers to have been offered the opportunity to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. In 2007, 66% of full-time workers were offered a retirement plan at work, compared to 36% of part-time workers. More than half of full-time workers (53%) participated in employer-sponsored retirement plans in 2007, compared to just 19% of part-time workers. (p. 3)

Purcell, P. (2009). Retirement savings and household wealth in 2007. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL30922_20090408.pdf

This Congressional Research Service (CRS) report presents data on retirement savings account ownership and retirement account balance collected through the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) in 2001, 2004, and 2007. The SCF is a survey of households sponsored by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in cooperation with the Department of the Treasury.

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "almost 60% of Americans say they have lost money in mutual funds, 401(k) plans, or the stock market in the last twelve months. Men and women in or near retirement suffered the greatest losses," with 61% of boomers and 63% of silent generation...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "almost 60% of Americans say they have lost money in mutual funds, 401(k) plans, or the stock market in the last twelve months. Men and women in or near retirement suffered the greatest losses," with 61% of boomers and 63% of silent generation respondents reporting such loss, compared to 45% of millenials. (fig. 1, p. 4)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. new fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "the biggest financial worry among the age 55+ population is being unable to afford uninsured medical expenses during retirement", with 46% of respondents reporting this concern, compared to 23% reporting a concern about "outliving my money" and...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "the biggest financial worry among the age 55+ population is being unable to afford uninsured medical expenses during retirement", with 46% of respondents reporting this concern, compared to 23% reporting a concern about "outliving my money" and 18% concerned about lack of personal savings. (fig 3, p. 4)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. new fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "only 18% of Americans now say they have actively planned enough and are confident about their retirement future. Even among the Silent Generation, most of whom are already retired, just 36% say they have actively planned and are confident they...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "only 18% of Americans now say they have actively planned enough and are confident about their retirement future. Even among the Silent Generation, most of whom are already retired, just 36% say they have actively planned and are confident they are adequately prepared", compared to 18% of boomers, and 11% of both Gen X'ers and Millenials(fig. 5, p. 5)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. new fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "on average, pre-retirees say they now intend to postpone their retirement by 4.2 years, triggered by today's economic crisis," with boomers reporting 3.6 years postponement, gen X'ers 5.0 years, and Millenials 4.7 years. Silent generation...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "on average, pre-retirees say they now intend to postpone their retirement by 4.2 years, triggered by today's economic crisis," with boomers reporting 3.6 years postponement, gen X'ers 5.0 years, and Millenials 4.7 years. Silent generation respondents expect to postpone retirement by 1.9 years. (fig. 7. p. 6)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. new fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "four out of 10 respondents now worry they will have to financially support their parents or in-laws, with Millennials feeling the greatest burden. This growing interdependence now extends to siblings, with nearly a quarter of millennials worrying...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, "four out of 10 respondents now worry they will have to financially support their parents or in-laws, with Millennials feeling the greatest burden. This growing interdependence now extends to siblings, with nearly a quarter of millennials worrying they will need to provide care and support for siblings as well. (fig. 17-18, p. 11)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. New fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, in response to a question regarding the balance between work and leisure in retirement, 70% wanted to include at least some periods of work in their retirement; 43% of respondents envision going back and forth between periods of work and periods...

In a 2009 multigenerational survey of retirement plans, in response to a question regarding the balance between work and leisure in retirement, 70% wanted to include at least some periods of work in their retirement; 43% of respondents envision going back and forth between periods of work and periods of leisure, 22% working part-time, 5% working full-time, and 30% never working for pay again. (fig 20, p. 13)

Age Wave. (2009). Retirement at the tipping point: The year that changed everything. New fears, new hopes, and a new purpose for retirement. New York: Harris Interactive. Retrieved from http://www.agewave.com/RetirementTippingPoint.pdf

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive from March 30-March 31, 2009. In total, 2,082 interviews were conducted among 21-84 year olds spanning four generations of adults: the Silent Generation (ages 64 to 84), the Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 63), Generation X (ages 33 to 44), and Millennials (ages 21 to 32).

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "in 2007, 40.6 percent of families included a participant in an employment-based retirement plan (either a defined benefit or defined contribution plan) from a current job. In 2007, 66.2 percent of families had a participant...

According to a 2009 analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, "in 2007, 40.6 percent of families included a participant in an employment-based retirement plan (either a defined benefit or defined contribution plan) from a current job. In 2007, 66.2 percent of families had a participant in [either] a current or previous employer's retirement plan or an IRA/Keogh." (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2009). Individual account retirement plans: An analysis of the 2007 survey of consumer finances, with market adjustments to June 2009 (Issue Brief No. 333). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_8-2009_No333_SCF.pdf

The Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), the Federal Reserve Board's triennial survey of wealth, is the basis for this study.

In a 2009 Gallup survey of adults employed full-time or part-time, 60% or more of the respondents were "completely satisfied," with relations with coworkers and flexibility of work hours. For other benefits and working conditions, the proportions reporting that they were completely satisfied are: health...

In a 2009 Gallup survey of adults employed full-time or part-time, 60% or more of the respondents were "completely satisfied," with relations with coworkers and flexibility of work hours. For other benefits and working conditions, the proportions reporting that they were completely satisfied are: health insurance benefits (43%), workload (54%), opportunities for promotion (40%), safety conditions (76%), job security (50%), vacation time (56%), and personal recognition (50%). Fewer than 40% were satisfied with pay, on-the-job stress, and employers' retirement plans.

Saad, L. (2009). Job security slips in U.S. worker satisfaction rankings. Retrieved August 31, 2009, from http://www.gallup.com/poll/122531/Job-Security-Slips-Worker-Satisfaction-Rankings.aspx

This survey was conducted by the Gallup Organization. Results are based on telephone interviews with 1,010 national adults, aged 18 and older, conducted Aug. 6-9, 2009.

According to a 2009 Pew survey, among the respondents "nearing retirement age--ages 50 to 61--a 63% majority think they might have to delay retirement because of the recession.Women in this retirement "threshold generation" have been most affected by the ailing economy. Fully 72% fear they will have...

According to a 2009 Pew survey, among the respondents "nearing retirement age--ages 50 to 61--a 63% majority think they might have to delay retirement because of the recession.Women in this retirement "threshold generation" have been most affected by the ailing economy. Fully 72% fear they will have to postpone their retirement plans, compared with 54% of men in this age group." (p. 20)

Pew Research Center. (2009). Recession turns a graying office grayer. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/americas-changing-workforce.pdf

This report is based on a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term trends in survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as on Pew Research's own survey of a representative national sample of 1,815 people ages 16 and older conducted from July 20 to Aug. 2, 2009.

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Labor Department data, "Employer-sponsored retirement plans are available to only about 38 percent of older Hispanic wage and salary workers, compared with about 64 percent of non-Hispanic whites and 55 percent of non-Hispanic blacks." (p. 19)

According to a 2009 analysis of U.S. Labor Department data, "Employer-sponsored retirement plans are available to only about 38 percent of older Hispanic wage and salary workers, compared with about 64 percent of non-Hispanic whites and 55 percent of non-Hispanic blacks." (p. 19)

Johnson, R. W., & Soto, M. (2009). 50+ Hispanic workers: A growing segment of the U.S. workforce. Washington, DC: AARP. Retrieved from http://assets.aarp.org/rgcenter/econ/hispanic_workers_09.pdf

This report is based on analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, as well as from the U.S. Department of Labor, University of Michigan and the Urban Institute.

According to a 2009 MetLife study, 50% of employees surveyed expressed interest in having their employers provide ways to convert retirement plan lump sums into income for life. On the other hand, only 21% of employers have expressed interest in having their company provide solutions that accomplish...

According to a 2009 MetLife study, 50% of employees surveyed expressed interest in having their employers provide ways to convert retirement plan lump sums into income for life. On the other hand, only 21% of employers have expressed interest in having their company provide solutions that accomplish this goal. (p. 48)

MetLife. (2009). Study of employee benefits trends: Findings from the 7th annual national survey of employers and employees. New York, NY: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Retrieved from http://whymetlife.com/trends/downloads/MetLife_EBTS09.pdf

The 7th annual MetLife Study of Employee Benefits Trends is based upon two separate sets of research interviews conducted during August and November 2008 among two distinct respondent groups. The August Study survey comprised 1,524 interviews with benefits decision-makers at companies with staff sizes of at least two employees. The employee sample comprised 1,349 interviews with full-time employees age 21 and over, at companies with a minimum of two employees. The November Study comprised 569 employer and 627 employee interviews at companies with at least two employees.

Data from the 2009 National Compensation Survey indicate that "sixty-seven percent of private industry employees had access to retirement benefits, compared with 90 percent of State and local government employees. Eighty-six percent of State and local government employees participated in a retirement...

Data from the 2009 National Compensation Survey indicate that "sixty-seven percent of private industry employees had access to retirement benefits, compared with 90 percent of State and local government employees. Eighty-six percent of State and local government employees participated in a retirement plan, a significantly greater percentage than for private industry workers, at 51 percent." (p. 1)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Employee benefits in the United States, March 2009. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/ebs2.pdf

These data are from the National Compensation Survey (NCS), which provides comprehensive measures of occupation earnings, compensation cost trends, and incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans. Farm and private household workers, the self-employed, and Federal government workers are excluded from the survey.

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "overall, union workers' rate of participation in retirement plans--at 80 percent--was greater than that of nonunion workers, which was 48 percent." (p. 2)

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "overall, union workers' rate of participation in retirement plans--at 80 percent--was greater than that of nonunion workers, which was 48 percent." (p. 2)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Program perspectives on retirement benefits (Issue No. 3). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/issue3.pdf

The estimates in this issue are from the National Compensation Survey of Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2008. (See www.bls.gov/ebs.)

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "in March 2008, the total cost to employers of private-industry retirement plans was 96 cents per hour worked. The cost of defined-contribution plans, 53 cents per hour, was higher than the cost of defined-benefit plans, 43 cents. However, because...

According to a 2009 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "in March 2008, the total cost to employers of private-industry retirement plans was 96 cents per hour worked. The cost of defined-contribution plans, 53 cents per hour, was higher than the cost of defined-benefit plans, 43 cents. However, because the percentage of employees participating in defined-contribution plans was more than double the percentage participating in defined-benefit plans, the cost per participating employee is higher for defined-benefit plans than for defined-contribution plans." (p. 3-4)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2009). Program perspectives on retirement benefits (Issue No. 3). Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/opub/perspectives/issue3.pdf

The estimates in this issue are from the National Compensation Survey of Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2008. (See www.bls.gov/ebs.)

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, "about 56 percent of all working-age (21-64) wage and salary employees work for an employer or union that sponsors a retirement plan. Among full-time, full-year wage and salary workers ages 21-64 (those with the strongest connection to the work force), just...

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, "about 56 percent of all working-age (21-64) wage and salary employees work for an employer or union that sponsors a retirement plan. Among full-time, full-year wage and salary workers ages 21-64 (those with the strongest connection to the work force), just under 63 percent worked for an employer or union that sponsors a plan. Among full-time, full-year wage and salary workers ages 21-64, just under 55 percent participated in a retirement plan." (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2009). Employment-based retirement plan participation: Geographic differences and trends, 2008 (Issue Brief No. 336). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_11-2009_No336_Ret-Part.pdf

This Issue Brief more closely examines this level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans "increases with age (62.7 percent for wage and salary workers ages 54-64, compared with 29.4 percent for those ages 21-24)." (p. 1)

According to a 2009 analysis of CPS data, participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans "increases with age (62.7 percent for wage and salary workers ages 54-64, compared with 29.4 percent for those ages 21-24)." (p. 1)

Copeland, C. (2009). Employment-based retirement plan participation: Geographic differences and trends, 2008 (Issue Brief No. 336). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_11-2009_No336_Ret-Part.pdf

This Issue Brief more closely examines this level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2009 Current Population Survey (CPS)

According to a 2009 survey from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, "full-time workers (84 percent) are far more likely than part-time workers (40%) to have an employee-funded retirement plan offered to them. This disparity is further amplified between workers of large and small companies....

According to a 2009 survey from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, "full-time workers (84 percent) are far more likely than part-time workers (40%) to have an employee-funded retirement plan offered to them. This disparity is further amplified between workers of large and small companies. Full-time workers of large companies (92 percent) are most likely to be offered an employee-funded plan. Part-time workers of small companies (24 percent) were least likely to be offered such a plan." (p. 19)

Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. (2009). 10th annual Transamerica retirement survey: Strengthening retirement savings in a weak economy. Retrieved from http://www.transamericacenter.org/resources/TCRS%2010th%20Annual%20Survey%20-%20Strengthening%20Savings.pdf

A 22 minute, online survey was conducted between December 16, 2008 - January 13, 2009 among a nationally representative sample of 3,466 for-profit workers using the Harris online panel.

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "the most popular initiatives implemented to manage the effects of the impending retirement of their older workers include: training for new positions (70%), telecommuting/working from a remote location (64%), career moves/lateral moves (55%),...

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "the most popular initiatives implemented to manage the effects of the impending retirement of their older workers include: training for new positions (70%), telecommuting/working from a remote location (64%), career moves/lateral moves (55%), continuing education programs (51%), retirement planning seminars (49%) and education or tools to assess the impact of earlier vs. later retirement including the effect on Social Security and pension benefits (49%)." (p. 14)

Metlife. (2009). MetLife emerging retirement model study: A survey of plan sponsors. New York: Metlife. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/institutional/services/cbf/retirement/EmergRetireModel-Study.pdf

MetLife commissioned Asset International to conduct online surveys with 240 employers from companies with at least 1,000 employees. Each respondent is from an organization that offers either a DB or DC plan or both, as well as other employer supported benefits. respondents came from companies that offer at least two of the following employee benefits where the organization pays some or the entire premium: medical insurance, dental insurance, disability insurance or life insurance.

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "nearly three-quarters (74%) of employers have either introduced (or plan to introduce) education or tools to help their employees make smart retirement decisions -- e.g., earlier vs. later retirement and when to take Social Security and pension...

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "nearly three-quarters (74%) of employers have either introduced (or plan to introduce) education or tools to help their employees make smart retirement decisions -- e.g., earlier vs. later retirement and when to take Social Security and pension benefits. In addition, nine-in-ten (89%) employers have already introduced (or intend to introduce) retirement planning seminars for employees." (p. 17)

Metlife. (2009). MetLife emerging retirement model study: A survey of plan sponsors. New York: Metlife. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/institutional/services/cbf/retirement/EmergRetireModel-Study.pdf

MetLife commissioned Asset International (which owns PlanSponsor magazine) to conduct online surveys with 240 employers from companies with at least 1,000 employees. Each respondent is from an organization that offers either a DB or DC plan or both, as well as other employer supported benefits. respondents came from companies that offer at least two of the following employee benefits where the organization pays some or the entire premium: medical insurance, dental insurance, disability insurance or life insurance.

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "seven in ten employers (71%) strongly or somewhat agree that regulatory complexities and ambiguities involving federal tax and age discrimination laws impact their organization's ability to offer a phased retirement program. About half...

According to a 2009 MetLife survey of 240 large employers, "seven in ten employers (71%) strongly or somewhat agree that regulatory complexities and ambiguities involving federal tax and age discrimination laws impact their organization's ability to offer a phased retirement program. About half (51%) of employers also strongly or somewhat agree that the retirement plan nondiscrimination rules can be an obstacle to an effective phased retirement program for their organization." (p. 27)

Metlife. (2009). MetLife emerging retirement model study: A survey of plan sponsors. New York: Metlife. Retrieved from http://www.metlife.com/assets/institutional/services/cbf/retirement/EmergRetireModel-Study.pdf

MetLife commissioned Asset International to conduct online surveys with 240 employers from companies with at least 1,000 employees. Each respondent is from an organization that offers either a DB or DC plan or both, as well as other employer supported benefits. respondents came from companies that offer at least two of the following employee benefits where the organization pays some or the entire premium: medical insurance, dental insurance, disability insurance or life insurance.

A 2009 analysis of data from the Sloan Center on Aging and Work shows that "organizations with a union presence (27%) were more likely to offer guaranteed or defined pension benefits to all of their employees than organizations without a union presence (16%). However, organizations with a union presence...

A 2009 analysis of data from the Sloan Center on Aging and Work shows that "organizations with a union presence (27%) were more likely to offer guaranteed or defined pension benefits to all of their employees than organizations without a union presence (16%). However, organizations with a union presence were no different from organizations without a union in terms of the proportion of their work forces that have access to a defined contribution retirement plan." (p. 139)

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Sano, J., & Matz-Costa, C. (2009). Unions' responsiveness to the aging of the workforce. Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health, 24(1), 125-146. doi:10.1080/15555240902849065

Data from the Sloan Center on Aging & Works National Study of Business Strategy and Workforce Development  were analyzed to examine the relationships between organizational characteristics, including union presence, and the availability of selected policies and benefits that are important to older workers. Information was gathered from 578 organizations with 50 or more employees.

According to a 2008 survey of small business owners, "68% of the business owners have set up a plan [for their own retirement] or are starting to create one, and seven in 10 already have a savings plan to reach their goal. More than a third (35%) said their own retirement plan is solid, and another...

According to a 2008 survey of small business owners, "68% of the business owners have set up a plan [for their own retirement] or are starting to create one, and seven in 10 already have a savings plan to reach their goal. More than a third (35%) said their own retirement plan is solid, and another 10 percent will have a plan in place by year-end."

National Association of Professional Employee Organizations. (2008). Report on the February 2008 survey of small businesses: Small businesses outpace larger ones in planning for impact of aging workforce. Alexandria, VA: NAPEO. Retrieved from http://www.napeo.org/newscenter/research.cfm

Approximately 400 small business owners participated voluntarily in the February 2008 survey conducted by the National Association of Professional Employer Organizations [NAPEO]. Three-quarters of the 404 businesses in the NAPEO survey have 50 or fewer workers; of these, 31 percent have 10 or fewer, 24 percent, 11-20 workers, and 21 percent, 21-50. The other quarter have 50 or more, with 11 percent reporting 100 or more.

According to a 2008 survey of small business owners, 67% of the business owners report that they offer a 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plan for their workers. Of those, 75% report that they also "contribute to a 401(k) plan- a substantial increase from the 53 percent in the 2007 survey. Another 7 percent...

According to a 2008 survey of small business owners, 67% of the business owners report that they offer a 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plan for their workers. Of those, 75% report that they also "contribute to a 401(k) plan- a substantial increase from the 53 percent in the 2007 survey. Another 7 percent this year said they plan to start contributing with the next two years."

National Association of Professional Employee Organizations. (2008). Report on the February 2008 survey of small businesses: Small businesses outpace larger ones in planning for impact of aging workforce. Alexandria, VA: NAPEO. Retrieved from http://www.napeo.org/newscenter/research.cfm

Approximately 400 small business owners participated voluntarily in the February 2008 survey conducted by the National Association of Professional Employer Organizations [NAPEO]. Three-quarters of the 404 businesses in the NAPEO survey have 50 or fewer workers; of these, 31 percent have 10 or fewer, 24 percent, 11-20 workers, and 21 percent, 21-50. The other quarter have 50 or more, with 11 percent reporting 100 or more.

According to a 2008 analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, over 90% had access to health insurance -- paid in part or full by their employers, approximately 80% had employers that contribute to their pension or retirement plans, and 15-19% had access to a high level...

According to a 2008 analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce, over 90% had access to health insurance -- paid in part or full by their employers, approximately 80% had employers that contribute to their pension or retirement plans, and 15-19% had access to a high level of flexible work options. (fig 7, p. 5)


Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

Analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that "among older workers, the odds of being very satisfied with life are 52.2% higher for those who have employers that contribute to their pension or retirement plans than for those who do not, and 67.4% higher for those...

Analysis of data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce shows that "among older workers, the odds of being very satisfied with life are 52.2% higher for those who have employers that contribute to their pension or retirement plans than for those who do not, and 67.4% higher for those who have a high level of flexibility on the job than for those who do not." (p. 6)

Johnson, J. K. M., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Besen, E., Smyer, M., & Matz-Costa, C. (2008). Quality of employment and life-satisfaction: A relationship that matters for older workers (Issue Brief No. 13). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB13_LifeSatisfaction.pdf

Drawing on data from various sources, this issue brief offers insights about how employment experiences affect the life satisfaction of older workers.

In June 2008, according to data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "average costs in private industry for retirement and savings benefits were 95 cents per hour worked, or 3.6 percent of total compensation. The average cost per hour worked for defined benefit plans--retirement plans that typically...

In June 2008, according to data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "average costs in private industry for retirement and savings benefits were 95 cents per hour worked, or 3.6 percent of total compensation. The average cost per hour worked for defined benefit plans--retirement plans that typically specify a benefit based on age, years of service, and earnings--was 42 cents (1.6 percent of total compensation). The average cost for defined contribution plans--retirement plans usually based on employer contributions to individual employee accounts--was 53 cents (2.0 percent of total compensation)." (p. 2)

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). Employer costs for employee compensation - June 2008. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/ecec.pdf

The cost levels for this quarter were collected from a probability sample of approximately 56,500 occupations selected from a sample of about 12,100 establishments in private industry and approximately 11,800 occupations from a sample of about 1,900 establishments in state and local governments.

According to a 2008 BLS report, "sixty-one percent of private industry employees had access to paid retirement benefits, compared with 89 percent of State and local government employees. Eighty-six percent of government employees participated in a retirement plan, significantly greater than the approximately...

According to a 2008 BLS report, "sixty-one percent of private industry employees had access to paid retirement benefits, compared with 89 percent of State and local government employees. Eighty-six percent of government employees participated in a retirement plan, significantly greater than the approximately half of private industry workers." (p. 1 and Table 1)


Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2008). Employee benefits in the United States, March 2008. Washington, DC: U. S. Department of Labor. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/ebs2_08072008.pdf

The data are from the March 2008 National Compensation Survey (NCS), which provides comprehensive measures of occupational earnings, compensation cost trends, and incidence and provisions of employee benefit plans. For the first time, this release includes data on benefits for civilian workers. Farm and private household workers, the self-employed, and the Federal government are excluded from the survey.

According to the 2008 National Study of Employers, among the benefits to financial security offered by employers, 26% offer a defined/guaranteed benefit pension plan, 76% offer a company contribution to a retirement plan, and 34% offer a long-term care insurance plan. (Table 30, p. 6)

According to the 2008 National Study of Employers, among the benefits to financial security offered by employers, 26% offer a defined/guaranteed benefit pension plan, 76% offer a company contribution to a retirement plan, and 34% offer a long-term care insurance plan. (Table 30, p. 6)

Galinsky, E., Bond, J. T., & Sakai, K. (2008). 2008 national study of employers. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute. Retrieved from http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/reports/2008nse.pdf

The 2008 National Study of Employers (NSE) sample includes 1,100 employers with 50 or more employees--77 percent are for profit employers and 23 percent are nonprofit organizations; 40 percent operate at only one location, while 60 percent have operations at more than one location. Interviews were conducted on behalf of Families and Work Institute by Harris Interactive, Inc. This is the third NSE; previous studies were conducted in 1998 and 2005.

According to the 2008 Retirement Confidence Survey, 47 percent of workers "say they and/or their spouse have tried to calculate how much money they will need for a comfortable retirement, up from the 42 percent measured in 2004-2006 and considerably higher than the low point of 29 percent recorded in...

According to the 2008 Retirement Confidence Survey, 47 percent of workers "say they and/or their spouse have tried to calculate how much money they will need for a comfortable retirement, up from the 42 percent measured in 2004-2006 and considerably higher than the low point of 29 percent recorded in 1996.... Doing a retirement savings calculation is particularly effective at changing worker behavior: 44 percent who calculated a goal changed their retirement planning, and of those almost two-thirds (59 percent) started saving or investing more." (p. 4)

Helman, R., VanDerhei, J., & Copeland, C. (2008). The 2008 retirement confidence survey: Americans much more worried about retirement, health costs a big concern (Issue Brief No. 316). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_04-2008.pdf

These findings are part of the 18th annual Retirement Confidence Survey, a survey that gauges the views and attitudes of working-age and retired Americans regarding retirement, their preparations for retirement, their confidence with regard to various aspects of retirement, and related issues. The survey was conducted in January 2008 through 20-minute telephone interviews with 1,322 individuals (1,057 workers and 265 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States. Random digit dialing was used to obtain a representative cross section of the U.S. population.

In a 2008 survey of retirement plan experts, respondents project that within 5 years, 40% of retirement plans will include a lifetime benefit option, such as an annuity. It was also projected that 32% of employers will offer phased retirement plans, which allow aging participants to remain employed...

In a 2008 survey of retirement plan experts, respondents project that within 5 years, 40% of retirement plans will include a lifetime benefit option, such as an annuity. It was also projected that 32% of employers will offer phased retirement plans, which allow aging participants to remain employed after they start taking distributions from retirement plans. (p. 11)

Diversified Investment Advisors. (2008). Prescience 2013: Expert opinions on the future of retirement plans. Purchase, NY: Diversified Investment Advisors, Inc.

Prescience 2013 is a modified Delphi Study which was conducted in the second quarter of 2008. Fifty-nie retirement plan experts from 45 organizations (US) responded. Survey participants are thought leaders and experienced professional in the retirement plans business. (p. 3)

Acording to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data, among wage and salary workers ages 21-64, 57.6 percent worked for an employer or union that sponsored a pension or retirement plan. The portion participating in the plans was 47.4 percent. When separating these wage and salary workers into...

Acording to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data, among wage and salary workers ages 21-64, 57.6 percent worked for an employer or union that sponsored a pension or retirement plan. The portion participating in the plans was 47.4 percent. When separating these wage and salary workers into the public and private sectors, the percentages participating differ significantly. Approximately 75 percent (75.4 percent) of the public-sector workers participated in an employment-based retirement plan, compared with 42.0 percent of the private-sector workers. (p. 6)

Copeland, C. (2008). Employment-based retirement plan participation (Issue Brief No. 322). Washington, DC: Employee Benefits Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_10-2008.pdf

This report presents an analysis of data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey, which has asked questions in a consistent manner each March since at least 1988 about whether a worker worked for an employer or union that sponsored a pension or retirement plan for any of its employees, and then if the worker was included in that plan. The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the CPS for the BLS by interviewing about 57,000 households and asking numerous questions about individuals' work status, employers, income, and basic demographic characteristics.

According to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data,"the percentage of wage and salary workers ages 21-64 participating in a retirement plan in 2007 increased with age. For those ages 21-24, 19.6 percent participated in a plan, compared with 56.6 percent of those ages 55-64. (p. 7)

According to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data,"the percentage of wage and salary workers ages 21-64 participating in a retirement plan in 2007 increased with age. For those ages 21-24, 19.6 percent participated in a plan, compared with 56.6 percent of those ages 55-64. (p. 7)

Copeland, C. (2008). Employment-based retirement plan participation (Issue Brief No. 322). Washington, DC: Employee Benefits Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_10-2008.pdf

This report presents an analysis of data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly survey, which has asked questions in a consistent manner each March since at least 1988 about whether a worker worked for an employer or union thatsponsored a pension or retirement plan for any of its employees, and then if the worker was included in that plan.  The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the CPS for the BLS by interviewing about 57,000 households and asking numerous questions about individuals’ work status, employers, income, and basic demographic characteristics.

A 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data shows that "when looking at workers by age across earnings, younger workers are less likely to be a retirement plan participant than older workers with the same earnings. Even for the highest earners ($50,000 or more), 49.2 percent of those ages 21-24...

A 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data shows that "when looking at workers by age across earnings, younger workers are less likely to be a retirement plan participant than older workers with the same earnings. Even for the highest earners ($50,000 or more), 49.2 percent of those ages 21-24 participated in a plan, compared with 74.4 percent of those ages 45-54. (p. 14)

Copeland, C. (2008). Employment-based retirement plan participation (Issue Brief No. 322). Washington, DC: Employee Benefits Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_10-2008.pdf

This Issue Brief closely examines the level of participation by workers in public- and private-sector employment-based pension or retirement plans, based on the U.S. Census Bureau's March 2008 Current Population Survey (CPS), the most recent data currently available.

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that younger employees are the least likely to have access to core benefits: personal health insurance, family health insurance, pension, retirement plan, paid vacation days, paid holidays, & paid sick days. Among respondents under...

A 2008 analysis of data by the Sloan Center for Aging and Work shows that younger employees are the least likely to have access to core benefits: personal health insurance, family health insurance, pension, retirement plan, paid vacation days, paid holidays, & paid sick days. Among respondents under age 35, 63% of workers reported low access to such benefits, compared to 12.2% of workers aged 50 or older. (fig. 1, p. 4)

McNamara, T. K., Ollier-Malaterre, A., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2008). Mind the gap: United states - employee perspective. Chestnut Hill, MA: Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/MTG_US%20Employee_2008-11-20.pdf

This paper examines the preferences and perceptions of young adult employees, employees at midlife, and older employees in the U.S. about the quality of their employment experiences, based on analysis of data from the National Study of the Changing Workforce, the World Values Survey, and other sources.

According to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data, between 2000 and 2007, the number of private-sector workers between the ages of 25 and 64 who participated in employer-sponsored retirement plans fell from 46 million to 44 million. The percentage of workers who participated in an employer...

According to a 2008 analysis of Current Population Survey data, between 2000 and 2007, the number of private-sector workers between the ages of 25 and 64 who participated in employer-sponsored retirement plans fell from 46 million to 44 million. The percentage of workers who participated in an employer sponsored plan fell from 50.3% in 2000 to 45.1% in 2007

Purcell, P. (2008). Pension sponsorship and participation: Summary of recent trends (CRS Report for Congress No. RL30122). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved from http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/files

This report presents a CRS analysis of the Current Population Survey data from 1990-2007.

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, when compared to young employees, approximately three fourths of employees at mid-life and older have access to guaranteed benefit pension plans, and 40% have access to 401k (or similar) retirement plans. For younger employees...

According to data from the 2007 National Study of the Changing Workforce, when compared to young employees, approximately three fourths of employees at mid-life and older have access to guaranteed benefit pension plans, and 40% have access to 401k (or similar) retirement plans. For younger employees (aged 18-30) only 26% report having access to guaranteed benefit pension plans and 61% to 401K plans. (fig. 7, p. 6)


Shen, C., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2007). Today's multi-generational workforce: A proposition of value (Issue Brief No. 10). Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/IB10_MultiGenValue.pdf

This Issue Brief uses a lens of “human capital costs and benefits” to examine the work experiences of young employees (aged 18-30 years), employees at mid-life (31-49 years), and older employees (50 years and older). Many of the findings discussed in this Issue Brief are the result of new analyses completed using information gathered from the wage and salaried workers (N = 2,785) who responded to the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). 25% of the respondents who provided their ages were between the ages of 18-30, 48% were between the ages of 31-49, and 27% were 50 years or older. The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers. (p. 1)

In a 2006 MetLife study, "when asked what they wish they had done differently in preparing for this stage of life, more than 62% of aging Baby Boomers (55-59) suggested better financial and/or retirement planning. That theme was also strong with 60-65 year olds (49%) and 66-70 year-olds (47%)." (p.19)

In a 2006 MetLife study, "when asked what they wish they had done differently in preparing for this stage of life, more than 62% of aging Baby Boomers (55-59) suggested better financial and/or retirement planning. That theme was also strong with 60-65 year olds (49%) and 66-70 year-olds (47%)." (p.19)

MetLife Mature Market Institute. (2006, April). Living longer, working longer: The changing landscape of the aging workforce- a MetLife Study.  New York, NY: MetLife Mature Market Institute, DeLong, D., & Zogby International.  Retrieved August 10, 2006, from http://www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/93703586101144176243V1FLivingLonger.pdf

"This study describes the decisions that older workers are actually making about work and retirement. It reports on their experiences more than their expectations of the journey into retirement, assuming that life stage is not defined by some date, but is rather an ongoing process… It consisted of an interactive online survey conducted by Zogby with a panel of 2,719 respondents. To qualify for the study, participants had to be between the ages of 55-70. Slight weights were added to region, race and gender to more accurately reflect the population of U.S. adults. A primary focus of the 50-question survey was to better understand the experiences and behaviors of the aging workforce, so the survey included many questions asked only of people who were still working or seeking work, either full- or part-time.”

In 2003, small employers cited the following reasons for not offering a retirement plan: 41% of small employers cited business related reasons, 27% of small employers cited employee related reasons, 25% of small employers cited cost and administration reasons, and 6% of small employers cited other reasons....

In 2003, small employers cited the following reasons for not offering a retirement plan: 41% of small employers cited business related reasons, 27% of small employers cited employee related reasons, 25% of small employers cited cost and administration reasons, and 6% of small employers cited other reasons. (p.4, Fig. 6)

Munnell, A. H., & Perun, P. (2006). An update on private pensions (Issue Brief No. 50). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved from http://crr.bc.edu/images/stories/Briefs/ib_50.pdf?phpMyAdmin=43ac483c4de9t51d9eb41

Using primarily the 1980 through 2005 Current Population Survey data, ”this brief…explores who is covered by a pension plan and who is not, how much retirees receive in pension income, and how pension coverage and receipt have changed over time. The key finding is that total pension coverage has continued to shift to 401(k) plans. These developments, coupled with declining levels of earnings replacement under Social Security, mean that future retirees will have to work longer if they want to maintain their pre-retirement standard of living in retirement." (p.1)

According to the 2006 Retirement Confidence Survey, participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans could be enhanced by adding automatic options. A majority of employed workers favor automatic enrollment (69 percent), automatically increasing the percentage of salary contributed when an increase...

According to the 2006 Retirement Confidence Survey, participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans could be enhanced by adding automatic options. A majority of employed workers favor automatic enrollment (69 percent), automatically increasing the percentage of salary contributed when an increase in pay is received (65 percent), and automatically investing contributions for the employee (59 percent). Plan participants and nonparticipants are equally likely to favor each of these automatic features. (p. 4)

Helman, R., Copeland, C., & VanDerhei, J. (2006). Will more of us be working forever? the 2006 retirement confidence survey. (Issue Brief No. 292). Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibdisp&content_id=3630

These findings are part of the 16th annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS), a survey that gauges the views and attitudes of working-age and retired Americans regarding retirement, their preparations for
retirement, their confidence with regard to various aspects of retirement, and related issues. The survey was conducted in January 2006 through 21-minute telephone interviews with 1,252 individuals (1,000 workers
and 252 retirees) age 25 and older in the United States.

According to the 2005 Work-Filled Retirement survey, "among the subgroup of workers that have already retired from their main job but remain in the labor force, most have alternate means of income that function as their primary financial support. Thirty-three percent rely primarily on employer-sponsored...

According to the 2005 Work-Filled Retirement survey, "among the subgroup of workers that have already retired from their main job but remain in the labor force, most have alternate means of income that function as their primary financial support. Thirty-three percent rely primarily on employer-sponsored pensions or 401(k)s, while 17% rely on Social Security, and 16% rely on income from personal savings. Thirteen percent earn their primary income from a part-time job, while other forms of support include spousal income, spousal retirement plans, and full-time jobs." (p.22-23)

Reynolds, S., Ridley, N., & Van Horn, C. (2005). A work-filled retirement: Workers’ changing views on employment and leisure (Work Trends Survey No. 8.1). New Brunswick, NJ: John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University. Retrieved from http://www.heldrich.rutgers.edu/uploadedFiles/Publications/WT16.pdf

“In this report, American workers across the nation describe their expectations of retirement and their views of how older workers are treated in the workplace…A total of 1,232 adults were interviewed for this survey. Respondents who worked full or part time, or who were unemployed and looking for work, received a complete interview. A total of 432 respondents who did not meet these criteria received a short interview that included demographic questions. The results of this report are based on a total of 800 complete interviews with members of the workforce, including 82 people who have retired from their primary job but remain in the workforce. The final results were weighted to match U.S. Census Bureau estimates for age, educational attainment, gender, and race.”

According to a 2005 AARP survey of adults aged 50 and older, "workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to retire by age 65 (43%) were more likely than those who plan to work beyond age 65 (37%) to express interest [in a phased retirement plan]." (p.10)

According to a 2005 AARP survey of adults aged 50 and older, "workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to retire by age 65 (43%) were more likely than those who plan to work beyond age 65 (37%) to express interest [in a phased retirement plan]." (p.10)

AARP. (2005, March). Attitudes of individuals 50 and older toward phased retirement. Research report. Washington, DC: Brown, K.S. Retrieved June 1, 2006, from http://www.aarp.org/research/work/retirement/Articles/attitudes_of_individuals_50_and_older_toward_phase.html

"This survey of individuals ages 50 and older was designed to gauge reactions to the concept of phased retirement as outlined and to determine the extent to which phased retirement would encourage workers near traditional retirement age to remain in the workforce longer than they would have otherwise...Conducted from January 6th through January 15th 2005, the survey was fielded to panel members who were ages 50 or older...A total of 2,167 individuals participated in the survey. Of all respondents, approximately one-third were workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to retire by age 65, about one-quarter were workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to continue working beyond age 65, approximately one in ten were workers ages 66 or older, and the remaining one-quarter were individuals ages 50 or older who are currently retired."

According to a 2005 AARP survey of adults aged 50 and older, "...one-third (33%) of retirees indicated that they would have remained in the workforce longer if such a phased retirement plan had been offered to them."

According to a 2005 AARP survey of adults aged 50 and older, "...one-third (33%) of retirees indicated that they would have remained in the workforce longer if such a phased retirement plan had been offered to them."

AARP. (2005, March). Attitudes of individuals 50 and older toward phased retirement. Research report. Washington, DC: Brown, K.S. Retrieved June 1, 2006, from http://www.aarp.org/research/work/retirement/Articles/attitudes_of_individuals_50_and_older_toward_phase.html

"This survey of individuals ages 50 and older was designed to gauge reactions to the concept of phased retirement as outlined and to determine the extent to which phased retirement would encourage workers near traditional retirement age to remain in the workforce longer than they would have otherwise...Conducted from January 6th through January 15th 2005, the survey was fielded to panel members who were ages 50 or older...A total of 2,167 individuals participated in the survey. Of all respondents, approximately one-third were workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to retire by age 65, about one-quarter were workers between the ages of 50 and 65 who plan to continue working beyond age 65, approximately one in ten were workers ages 66 or older, and the remaining one-quarter were individuals ages 50 or older who are currently retired."

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that “employers in 2005 are less likely (81%) than employers in 1998 (91%) to make contributions to employees’ retirement plans.” (Table 19, p. 26)

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that “employers in 2005 are less likely (81%) than employers in 1998 (91%) to make contributions to employees’ retirement plans.” (Table 19, p. 26)

Families and Work Institute. (2005, September).2005 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Bond, T. J., Galinsky, E., Kim, S. S., & Brownfield, E. Retrieved August 02, 2006, from http://familiesandwork.org/press/2005nserelease.html#nse

“Families and Work Institute’s 2005 National Study of Employers (NSE) is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching study of the practices, policies, programs and benefits provided by U.S. employers to address the changing needs of today’s workforce and workplace…will provide ongoing measurements of employer work life benefits, policies, and practices. In 2005, it was redesigned to include a nationally representative sample of employers with 50 or more employers…The 2005 NSE sample included 1,092 employers with 50 or more employees-66 percent are for-profit companies and 34 percent are nonprofit organizations; 44 percent operate at only one location, while 56 percent have operations at more than one location.”

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 74% of companies operating individual retirement plans also make contributions to them. (Table 18, pp.24-25)

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that 74% of companies operating individual retirement plans also make contributions to them. (Table 18, pp.24-25)

Families and Work Institute. (2005, September).2005 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Bond, T. J., Galinsky, E., Kim, S. S., & Brownfield, E. Retrieved August 02, 2006, from http://familiesandwork.org/press/2005nserelease.html#nse

“Families and Work Institute’s 2005 National Study of Employers (NSE) is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching study of the practices, policies, programs and benefits provided by U.S. employers to address the changing needs of today’s workforce and workplace…will provide ongoing measurements of employer work life benefits, policies, and practices. In 2005, it was redesigned to include a nationally representative sample of employers with 50 or more employers…The 2005 NSE sample included 1,092 employers with 50 or more employees-66 percent are for-profit companies and 34 percent are nonprofit organizations; 44 percent operate at only one location, while 56 percent have operations at more than one location.”

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that in 2005, “companies with 50 or more employees are most likely (83%) to offer 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans, with for-profit companies using the former and non-profits the latter.” (Table 18,...

The 2005 National Study of Employers, which surveyed workplaces with 50 or more employees, found that in 2005, “companies with 50 or more employees are most likely (83%) to offer 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans, with for-profit companies using the former and non-profits the latter.” (Table 18, pp.24-25)

Families and Work Institute. (2005, September).2005 National Study of Employers. New York, NY: Bond, T. J., Galinsky, E., Kim, S. S., & Brownfield, E. Retrieved August 02, 2006, from http://familiesandwork.org/eproducts/2005nse.pdf

“Families and Work Institute’s 2005 National Study of Employers (NSE) is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching study of the practices, policies, programs and benefits provided by U.S. employers to address the changing needs of today’s workforce and workplace…will provide ongoing measurements of employer work life benefits, policies, and practices. In 2005, it was redesigned to include a nationally representative sample of employers with 50 or more employers…The 2005 NSE sample included 1,092 employers with 50 or more employees-66 percent are for-profit companies and 34 percent are nonprofit organizations; 44 percent operate at only one location, while 56 percent have operations at more than one location.”

A 2006 analysis of data from the National Survey of the Changing Workforce indicates that "men age 50 or older (45 percent) are more likely than women (35 percent) to indicate that they have a defined-benefits pension plan (or guaranteed-benefits pension plan) through work. However, older men and women...

A 2006 analysis of data from the National Survey of the Changing Workforce indicates that "men age 50 or older (45 percent) are more likely than women (35 percent) to indicate that they have a defined-benefits pension plan (or guaranteed-benefits pension plan) through work. However, older men and women are just as likely to have defined-contribution retirement plans (401(k), 403(b), etc.) at work."

Bond, T. J., Galinsky, M. E., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Smyer, M. A. (2005). The diverse employment experiences of older men and women in the workforce. (Research Highlight 02). Chestnut Hill, MA: Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility. Retrieved October 25, 2007 from http://agingandwork.bc.edu/documents/RH02_DiverseEmployExper.pdf

“This report is the second in a series of Research Highlights published by the Center on Aging & Work/Workplace Flexibility in collaboration with the Families and Work Institute. These Research Highlights present the findings of in-depth analyses of the Families and Work Institute’s 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW). This report compares and contrasts the experiences of men and women, 50 and older, in the U.S. workforce. Gender is an important lens for examining the employment experiences of older workers, in part because the work and family histories of men and women tend to vary across the course of their lives…The National Study of the Changing Workforce (NSCW) is conducted every five years. It surveys large samples of the U.S. workforce to collect information about both the work and personal lives of U.S. workers.”

A 2004 analysis of survey data from the U.S. Department of Labor and the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey found that of the eighty-five percent of workers with access to retirement plans of some type participated in [either] defined benefits (21%) or defined contribution plans...

A 2004 analysis of survey data from the U.S. Department of Labor and the Bureau of Labor Statistics National Compensation Survey found that of the eighty-five percent of workers with access to retirement plans of some type participated in [either] defined benefits (21%) or defined contribution plans (42%), or in both types of plans (50%). (p.1 and 6)

U.S. Department of Labor & Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2004, November). National compensation survey: Employee benefits in private industry in the United States, March 2004. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor and Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"The 2004 National Compensation Survey (NCS) benefits survey obtained data from 4,703 private industry establishments, an economic unit that produces goods or services, a central administrative office, or an auxiliary unit providing support services to a company) representing nearly 102.3 million workers; of this number, nearly 78 million were full-time workers and the remainder, slightly more than 24 million, were part-time workers." (p.26-27)

According to a 2003 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "in March 2003, just under half of private industry employees participated in an employer provided retirement plan."

According to a 2003 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, "in March 2003, just under half of private industry employees participated in an employer provided retirement plan."

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003, October). Retirement plans in 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2007 from http://www.bls.gov/opud/ted/2003/sept/wk5/art05.htm.

"These data are from the BLS National Compensation Survey program. Learn more in Employee Benefits in Private Industry, 2003 (PDF) (TXT), USDL 03-489."

According to a 2001 report from EBRI, "the majority of working women (70 percent in 2000) are concentrated in two industries: services, 49.0 percent, and wholesale/retail trade, 20.9 percent. By comparison, men are not heavily concentrated in one or two industries. In 2000, 26 percent of working men...

According to a 2001 report from EBRI, "the majority of working women (70 percent in 2000) are concentrated in two industries: services, 49.0 percent, and wholesale/retail trade, 20.9 percent. By comparison, men are not heavily concentrated in one or two industries. In 2000, 26 percent of working men were in services industries, 20 percent were in wholesale/retail trade, and 19 percent were in manufacturing. Women tend to work in sectors that do not sponsor retirement plans as readily as the manufacturing sector does.

According to the most recent data available, the retirement plan sponsorship rate in the services industries was 52.8%; in the retail trade it was 43.9%; and in the manufacturing trade it was 72.9 percent." (p.2)

Employee Benefit Research Institute. (2001, November). Facts from EBRI: Women in retirement. Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute. Website: http://www.ebri.org/publications/facts/

"The Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) has tracked Americans financial preparations for retirement and their attitudes regarding retirement since 1991. The RCS is a random, nationally representative survey of Americans over age 25; both current workers (individuals who are not defined as retirees, regardless of employment status) and current retirees (individuals who are retired or who are 65 or older and not employed full-time) are surveyed, which allows comparisons across generations in terms of attitudes and financial preparations." (Salisbury, D., Turyn, T., & Helman, R. (2001, June). EBRI 2001 Retirement surveys: Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS), Minority RCS, and Small Employer Retirement Survey (SERS) (p.1). Washington, DC: EBRI.

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